Philosophy

ISSNs: 0031-8191, 1469-817X

17 found

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  1.  32
    Public Reason and Political Autonomy: Realizing the Ideal of a Civic People by Blain Neufeld (Routledge, 2022). [REVIEW]Gabriele Badano - 2024 - Philosophy 99 (2):310-314.
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  2.  15
    The Anscombean Mind by Adrian Haddock and Rachael Wiseman (eds.) (Routledge, 2022). Routledge Philosophical Minds series. [REVIEW]Lucy Campbell - 2024 - Philosophy 99 (2):314-319.
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  3.  14
    Feeling Responsible: On Regret for Others’ Harms.Magnus Ferguson - 2024 - Philosophy 99 (2):247-271.
    This paper investigates the moral emotion of being socially, but non-agentially connected to a harm. I propose understanding the emotion of an affiliated onlooker as a species of regret called ‘social-regret’. Breaking from existing guilt- and shame-based accounts, I argue that social-regret can be a fitting, expressive, and revelatory reactive attitude that opens the way for deliberation over accountability for others’ harms. When we feel social-regret, our attention is directed towards the moral salience of our social relations and the expectations (...)
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  4.  9
    Being Open-Minded about Open-Mindedness.Kasim Khorasanee - 2024 - Philosophy 99 (2):191-221.
    Within the field of virtue and vice epistemology open-mindedness is usually considered an archetypal virtue. Nevertheless, there is ongoing disagreement over how exactly it should be defined. In this paper I propose a novel definition of open-mindedness as a process of impartial belief revision and use it to argue that we should shift our normative assessments away from the trait itself to the context in which it is exercised. My definition works by three sequential stages: not screening new claims, impartially (...)
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  5.  18
    Mobility, Migration, and Mobile Migration.Anna Milioni - 2024 - Philosophy 99 (2):273-303.
    Our world is mobile. People move, either within the state or from one state to another, to access opportunities, to improve their living conditions, or to start afresh. Yet, we usually assume that migration is an exceptional activity that leads to permanent settlement. In this paper, I invite us to reconsider this assumption. First, I analyse several ways in which people experience mobility in contemporary societies. Then, I turn to migration, as a specific form of mobility. I distinguish between a (...)
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  6.  25
    The Role of Emotions in the Capabilities Approach: A Critical Analysis.Giulio Sacco - 2024 - Philosophy 99 (2):223-245.
    The capabilities approach is the theory according to which, in order to assess people's quality of life and reflect on the basic political entitlements, we should consider what people are capable of doing and being. Focusing mostly on Nussbaum's account, a number of scholars analysed the metaethical structure underlying the approach, showing her Aristotelian and Kantian sources. This article explores another aspect of Nussbaum's theory which has so far been somewhat overlooked: the role of emotions in the justification and motivational (...)
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  7.  10
    Dark Futures: Toward a Philosophical Archaeology of Hope.Paul C. Taylor - 2024 - Philosophy 99 (2):139-163.
    Early in World War I, Virginia Woolf wrote these words: ‘The future is dark, which is on the whole, the best thing the future can be […]’. It is tempting to assume that darkness simply hides the unknown and the threatening. It is more challenging to think of it as Woolf did: rich with possibility in even the most desperate times.We live in what many would readily describe as dark times. These times have brought (among much else) a once-in-a-century public (...)
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  8.  7
    Frank Griffel, The Formation of Post-Classical Philosophy in Islam (Oxford University Press, 2021).Sarah Virgi - 2024 - Philosophy 99 (2):305-309.
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  9. Later Wittgenstein on ‘Truth’ and Realism in Mathematics.Philip Bold - 2024 - Philosophy 99 (1):27-51.
    I show that Wittgenstein's critique of G.H. Hardy's mathematical realism naturally extends to Paul Benacerraf's influential paper, ‘Mathematical Truth’. Wittgenstein accuses Hardy of hastily analogizing mathematical and empirical propositions, thus leading to a picture of mathematical reality that is somehow akin to empirical reality despite the many puzzles this creates. Since Benacerraf relies on that very same analogy to raise problems about mathematical ‘truth’ and the alleged ‘reality’ to which it corresponds, his major argument falls prey to the same critique. (...)
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  10.  13
    Race and the Problem of Empty Concept Dependency.George Hull - 2024 - Philosophy 99 (1):99-122.
    Defences of racial anti-realism typically proceed by establishing that nothing possesses the descriptive characteristics associated with the term ‘race’. This leaves them vulnerable to the externalist challenge that the descriptive meaning of ‘race’ is subject to revision based on discoveries about the nature of its referent. That referent is, according to constructionist realists, the groups we call races (the R-groups). Anti-realists and constructionist realists agree that the R-groups are constructed as real social groups by being viewed and treated as though (...)
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  11. A Case for Necessitarianism by Amy Karofsky (Routledge, 2021). ISBN 9781032026169. [REVIEW]Samuel Kimpton-Nye - 2024 - Philosophy 99 (1):132-137.
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  12.  19
    Perspectival Realism by Michela Massimi (Oxford University Press, 2022). ISBN 978019755620. [REVIEW]Jack Ritchie - 2024 - Philosophy 99 (1):123-127.
    Michela Massimi has written a book broad in scope and ambition but full of wonderful details. It moves from technical philosophical discussions of conditionals to detailed case studies of work in child literacy. From perspectival art to dark matter. From Borges to blown glass – and much else in between. It is impossible not to be impressed. -/- Massimi's book is a detailed elaboration and defence of a position, perspectival realism, she has been developing over several years. Perspectival realism offers (...)
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  13.  21
    The Vicissitudes of Nature: From Spinoza to Freud by Richard J. Bernstein (Polity Press, 2023). ISBN 9781509555192.Thomas Stern - 2024 - Philosophy 99 (1):128-132.
  14.  74
    J.S. Mill's Puzzling Position on Prostitution and his Harm Principle.Mark Tunick - 2024 - Philosophy 99 (1):1-25.
    J.S. Mill argues against licensing or forced medical examinations of prostitutes even if these would reduce harm, for two reasons: the state should not legitimize immoral conduct; and coercing prostitutes would violate Mill's harm principle as they do not risk causing non-consensual harm to others, their clients do. There is nothing puzzling about Mill opposing coercive restrictions on self-regarding immoral conduct while also opposing state support of that conduct. But why does Mill oppose restrictions on prostitutes’ liberty if those restrictions (...)
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  15. Duty, Virtue, and Filial Love.Sungwoo Um - 2024 - Philosophy 99 (1):53-71.
    The aim of this paper is to argue that the normative significance of the inner aspects of filial piety – in particular, filial love – is better captured when we understand filial love as part of the virtue of filial piety rather than as an object of duty. After briefly introducing the value of filial love, I argue that the idea of a duty to love one's loving parents faces serious difficulties in making sense of the normative significance of filial (...)
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  16.  27
    Would a Viable Consent App Create Headaches for Consequentialists?Scott Woodcock - 2024 - Philosophy 99 (1):73-98.
    Greater public awareness of the occurrence of sexual assault has led to the creation of mobile phone apps designed to facilitate consent between sexual partners. These apps exhibit serious practical shortcomings in realistic contexts; however, in this paper I consider the hypothetical case in which these practical shortcomings are absent. The prospect of this viable consent app creates an interesting challenge for consequentialism – one that is comparable to the objection that the theory justifies killing innocent persons to prevent large (...)
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  17. P.F. Strawson on Punishment and the Hypothesis of Symbolic Retribution.Arnold Burms, Stefaan E. Cuypers & Benjamin de Mesel - 2024 - Philosophy (2):165-190.
    Strawson's view on punishment has been either neglected or recoiled from in contemporary scholarship on ‘Freedom and Resentment’ (FR). Strawson's alleged retributivism has made his view suspect and troublesome. In this article, we first argue, against the mainstream, that the punishment passage is an indispensable part of the main argument in FR (section 1) and elucidate in what sense Strawson can be called ‘a retributivist’ (section 2). We then elaborate our own hypothesis of symbolic retribution to explain the continuum between (...)
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