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  1.  3
    Don't Lie to Me About Fictional Characters: Meinongian Incomplete Objects to the Rescue of Truth in Fiction.Vera Albrecht - 2022 - Philosophy and Literature 46 (1):162-180.
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  2.  51
    The Virtue of Erotic Curiosity.Rachel Aumiller - 2022 - Philosophy and Literature 46 (1):208-222.
    Apuleius’s The Golden Ass presents curiosity as the protagonist’s downfall, yet ultimately recodes curiosity as the single virtue through which the human soul achieves not only immortality but joy. I identify Apuleius’s treatment of curiosity as falling into the categories of erotic and nonerotic. The union of Eros and the curious human soul suggests that one who is erotically curious can take pleasure in her devotion to one, precisely because she has eyes for the beauty of many.
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  3.  5
    "Money for Which My Buttocks Had Labored so Vigorously": John Locke and Sexual Labor in The London Jilt.Yoojung Choi - 2022 - Philosophy and Literature 46 (1):223-237.
  4.  1
    Why Deconstruction Might Work in Theory but Not in Practice.Alan Daboin - 2022 - Philosophy and Literature 46 (1):86-99.
  5.  2
    Giving Way: Thoughts on Unappreciated Dispositions by Steven Connor.Rick de Villiers - 2022 - Philosophy and Literature 46 (1):244-247.
    In "Who the Meek Are Not," poet Mary Karr thinks it unlikely that peasants, serfs, and the socially low will inherit the earth. Puzzling out that beatitude, she instead conjures the image of "a great stallion at full gallop / in a meadow, who—/at his master's voice—seizes up to a stunned / but instant halt."1 We are then invited to picture his muscles rippling even when at rest, to see in that rippling an immense power purposely held back. Blessed are (...)
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  6.  3
    From Heideggerian Dasein to Melvillean Masquerade: Historiology and Imaginative Excursion in Philip Roth's The Facts.James Duban - 2022 - Philosophy and Literature 46 (1):54-67.
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  7.  2
    Analytic Philosophy and the World of the Play by Michael Y. Bennett.Brice Ezell - 2022 - Philosophy and Literature 46 (1):241-243.
    There is no better time than the present to be studying the intersections of drama, theater, and philosophy. Since 2000, numerous monographs have been published on the interrelation between those subjects, and organizations such as the Performance Philosophy Network continue to promote innovative research by theater professionals and academics alike. However, a lacuna remains in this bustling scholarly enterprise. This scholarship, by and large, tends to draw from either ancient philosophy or from Continental European thought. As is often the case (...)
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  8.  1
    Flann O'Brien, Wittgenstein, and the Idling of Language.Andrew Gaedtke - 2022 - Philosophy and Literature 46 (1):22-37.
  9.  3
    Machiavelli, Philosopher and Playwright.Roy Glassberg - 2022 - Philosophy and Literature 46 (1):238-240.
    In his Epistle to the Pisos, Horace advises aspiring playwrights to use their work to teach and delight,1 a dictum that has resonated down through the ages and has been referred to as the "Horatian platitude."2 In the preface to his comedy Clizia, Niccolò Machiavelli echoes Horace: "Comedies were discovered in order to benefit and to delight the spectators. Truly it is a great benefit to any man, and especially to a youth, to know the avarice of an old man, (...)
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  10.  2
    Shakespeare Faciebat: Non-Finito Aesthetics in Timon of Athens.Marinela Golemi - 2022 - Philosophy and Literature 46 (1):38-53.
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  11.  2
    Divination and Correlative Thinking: Origins of an Aesthetic in the Book of Changes and Book of Songs.Ming Dong Gu - 2022 - Philosophy and Literature 46 (1):120-136.
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  12.  6
    The Murder of Professor Schlick: The Rise and Fall of the Vienna Circle by David Edmonds.David Herman - 2022 - Philosophy and Literature 46 (1):248-250.
    The main title and subtitle of this well-researched, lucidly written, and engaging book reflect the author's double-sided approach. On the one hand, David Edmonds uses individual life stories as a route of access to key philosophical, political, and sociocultural issues and trends in the first half of the twentieth century. On the other hand, in chronicling the broader history of the origins, aims, and legacy of the Vienna Circle, he shows how individual lives were caught up in—and shaped by—the group's (...)
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  13.  24
    Don't Feed the Liars! On Fraudulent Memoirs, and Why They're Bad.Joshua Landy - 2022 - Philosophy and Literature 46 (1):137-161.
    Some infamous memoirs have turned out to be chock-full of fibs. Should we care? Why not say—as many have—that all autobiography is fiction, that accurate memory is impossible, that we start lying as soon as we start narrating, and that it doesn’t matter anyway, since made-up stories are just as good as true ones? Because, well, every part of that is misleading. First, we don’t misremember absolutely everything; second, we have other sources to draw on; third, story form affects only (...)
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  14.  4
    Narration, Lying, and the Orienting Response.David Lehner - 2022 - Philosophy and Literature 46 (1):181-194.
    What is the orienting response, and what does it have to do with narrative? How is narrative related to lying? And what is the motive force of narrative? What we shall see is that the mental activity of writers creating fictions, readers reading them, liars fashioning lies, and listeners when they detect a lie, all share distinct and significant cognitive functions in common.
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  15.  2
    The Meaning of the Liar Paradox in Randall Jarrell's "Eighth Air Force".Richard McDonough - 2022 - Philosophy and Literature 46 (1):195-207.
    Do logical paradoxes, like Eubulides’s Liar Paradox (the claim that the sentence “I am now lying” is true if and only if it is false), have any “existential” significance or are they mere brain puzzles for the mathematically minded? The paper argues that Randall Jarrell’s poem, “Eighth Air Force”, contains a poetic use of Eubulides’ Liar Paradox, spoken by Pontius Pilate’s wife in her statements about the “murder” of Jesus, in order to capture, symbolically, the inherent universal duplicity (inauthenticity) of (...)
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  16.  15
    Why Do Philosophers Neglect the Short Story?Aaron Meskin - 2022 - Philosophy and Literature 46 (1):100-119.
    Philosophers of literature have neglected the short story. I argue that this neglect is unwarranted. The short story raises interesting philosophical questions that deserve attention. If philosophers only ever focused on one form of narrative prose—the novel—they would end up with a distorted picture of literature.
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  17.  3
    Agency, Luck, and Tragedy.Charles Nussbaum - 2022 - Philosophy and Literature 46 (1):68-85.
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  18.  1
    On Wittgenstein, Lydia Davis, and Other Uncanny Grammarians.Ben Roth - 2022 - Philosophy and Literature 46 (1):1-21.
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