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  1.  1
    Roots of (African American) Rhetorical Theory in Frederick Douglass's My Bondage and My Freedom.D'Angelo Bridges - 2020 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 53 (1):51-61.
    One might presume that elite educational environments, including colleges and universities, have been the exclusive venues for rhetorical theory. Rhetorical theory typically takes the form of published treatises, monographs, and essays. Thus, the status of theorist would have been denied to, among others, African Americans during the nineteenth century because they were not afforded opportunities to become literate or, even if literate, not admitted into realms of elite literacy. But there are the seeds of a competing story, particularly regarding the (...)
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  2.  1
    The Body as a Site of Material-Symbolic Struggle: Toward a Marxist New Materialism.Catherine Chaput - 2020 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 53 (1):89-103.
    The imperative to theorize emerges in the practical question of how to live in the world with others. In the contemporary historical moment, one shot through with two hundred fifty years of capitalist political economic practices, such an imperative requires theorists to both use and go beyond a Marxist critique. This need to fold Marxist theory back into itself in an effort to emerge differently inspired, among others, Frankfurt School theorists who wove psychoanalysis into historical materialism, Birmingham School thinkers who (...)
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  3.  1
    Editor's Note.Erik Doxtader - 2020 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 53 (1):v-vi.
    Early days, things fallen asleep, hidden things, possibilities, melodies of the past and the future, timeless plans, float by, one after the other, and I feel rich under a hoard of gifts and must have hope. Then the day wakes, the nearness, the sharpness, and I am disturbed. I close my eyes in order not to see it, fall asleep again, heavily, am assailed by dreams, and frequently awaken only in the course of the afternoon without feeling restored.Now is never (...)
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  4.  2
    Why Theory Now? An Introduction.Daniel M. Gross - 2020 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 53 (1):1-5.
    “rhetorical theory” since 1800. Data source: Google Trends “rhetorical theory”, “literary theory”, and “critical theory”, since 1800. Data source: Google Trends The old news is that Theory with a capital “T” happened from approximately 1965–85 and then dissipated in scandal. Or to the contrary, Theory is an ancient and global activity we find wherever we have evidence of systematic reflection, upon language especially. Alive and well. But neither of these stories can be adequate given a graph like those above, and (...)
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  5. Beginnings and Ends of Rhetorical Theory: Ann Arbor 1900.Daniel M. Gross - 2020 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 53 (1):34.
    If you are like me, you find the Google Ngram at the outset of this forum surprising because we have learned that rhetorical theory is much, much older than the nineteenth-century invention it appears to be. At the same time you probably shouldn’t be surprised, because we can’t readily imagine Enheduanna, or Pan Chao, or even Gorgias or Aristotle, standing up and saying in their own tongue “I do rhetorical theory” or “I am a rhetorical theorist.”1 A “rhetorician,” perhaps in (...)
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  6.  1
    Theory and Philosophy: Antonyms in Our Semantic Field?Martin Jay - 2020 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 53 (1):6-20.
    In 1996, the sociological journal Theory and Society devoted a special issue to “Theory and Theoreticians.”1 My contribution, titled “For Theory,” was intended as an homage to the late Alvin Gouldner, the radical social theorist, self-described “outlaw Marxist,” and founding editor of the journal, among whose many books was one called For Sociology.2 The essay was also dedicated to the memory of Bill Readings, a gifted literary theorist inspired in particular by Jean-François Lyotard, and a participant in the seminar I (...)
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  7. Books of Interest. Kennedy & Schaukowitch - 2020 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 53 (1):104.
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  8. Theory Again.Steven Mailloux - 2020 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 53 (1):62-74.
    “Why theory now?” and related questions have punctuated the history of critical theory. During the so-called Theory Boom of the 1960s and 1970s in the U.S. academy, such questions were asked throughout the humanities and interpretive social sciences, and the array of answers included causes and motives both internal and external to the institutional context of the disciplines asking the questions. External accounts cited the sociopolitical upheavals of the period in the broader culture, and internal explanations noted interdisciplinary events such (...)
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  9.  3
    The Short History of Rhetorical Theory.Peter Simonson - 2020 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 53 (1):75-88.
    We’re in the midst of a wave of efforts to historicize and localize theory. One stream, oriented toward a global social imaginary, has sought to “ provincialize Europe,” in Dipesh Chakrabarty’s resonant trope. This means provincializing Euro-American social theory and situating it within a particular geopolitical formation—a contextualizing project that opens space to center what the Comaroffs call “theory from the South” and other regional or indigenous loci of orientation. Another stream situates itself more comfortably within Western traditions of theory (...)
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  10.  1
    “Not Theory, Thought”: Collingwood's Early Work on Art.Nancy S. Struever - 2020 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 53 (1):21-33.
    Collingwood’s “Libellus de Generatione: An Essay in Absolute Empiricism” was a tract of strenuous philosophical revisionism; never published, perhaps unpublishable, supposedly destroyed, it survived. He begins by stressing his obligations to David Hume; he offers his thematic: “absolute denial of any such concept as substance and the resolution of all reality into the reality of experience.” “The reality of mind is the process of its experience, its life, and nothing else”. Or, “the mind is a mirror... whose being is solely (...)
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