Philosophy and Rhetoric

ISSNs: 0031-8213, 1527-2079

18 found

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  1. Higher Education: Mobility, Movement, and Risk.Michael Bernard-Donals - 2024 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 57 (1):112-120.
    ABSTRACT With higher education in a state of flux, it’s time to more clearly understand what flux—mobility—means for the work of faculty at colleges and universities. With threats to shared governance, tenure, and academic freedom representing one sort of change, what would it mean for faculty to lean into the vulnerability that they are experiencing? Mobility has consequences: one of them is the risk of harm; another is the potential to destabilize concepts and entities. This article is an argument for (...)
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  2. Moving in the Manner of the Adverb.Marianne Constable - 2024 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 57 (1):93-102.
    ABSTRACT Learning to move slowly and attentively offers alternatives to how a fast-paced world induces us to act. The Feldenkrais Method’s® awareness-through-movement (ATM)® lessons encourage students to notice what they actually do and how, rather than cathecting on what they should accomplish and how well. Within the constraint of a lesson, one shifts focus from “movement” as noun to “moving” as verb. Students learn that options about how to move—slowly, quickly, lightly, jerkily, smoothly, delicately, precisely, roughly, loosely, energetically, lazily, and (...)
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  3.  1
    Phantasms of Fixity and a Gesture Toward Survival.Diane Davis - 2024 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 57 (1):121-130.
    ABSTRACT This article addresses the ethico-political implications of “living together” as the performative articulations of a generative movement (a running morphogenesis) that rests on nothing and to which there is no outside. It argues that any social, political, or intellectual movement that does not avow this différantial movement that comprehends it—and so that does not contest phantasms of purity and presence enough to guard, in Édouard Glissant’s terms, the singularity of “the Diverse”—forecloses, in advance, any future to come and therefore (...)
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  4.  1
    Editor’s Introduction: The State of Movement—or, Unassuming Theory.Erik Doxtader - 2024 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 57 (1):54-61.
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  5. Books of Interest.Michael Kennedy - 2024 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 57 (1):131-137.
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  6. The Resonance of Resonance.Mari Lee Mifsud - 2024 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 57 (1):81-92.
    ABSTRACT This article explores a state of movement in the humanities into nonhuman entanglements. A key term, “resonance,” emerges in this movement. Predominating scholarship orients resonance as a flourishing. In this article, accounts of the destructiveness of mechanical resonance signal a telling lacuna in humanities scholarship, one this article works to remove.
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  7.  2
    Figuring the Topos: Finding Common Ground in Cognitive Environments.Michael Joseph Regier - 2024 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 57 (1):30-53.
    ABSTRACT Effective communication relies on the use of rhetorical devices and strategies to make ideas present in the minds of an audience. By employing the concept of cognitive environments, we can use the visual analogy of making an idea “present” to its fullest effect, empowering our rhetorical skills and helping influence audience reception. In this article, the author argues that while cognitive environments do indeed provide a significant and important conceptual tool for understanding and anticipating an audience’s experiences, beliefs, and (...)
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  8. The Unachieved Momentum of Liberation: The French Résistance.Philippe-Joseph Salazar - 2024 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 57 (1):71-80.
    ABSTRACT Taking the example of the French Résistance and by summoning up the twin rhetorical concepts of kinesis and energeia, this article establishes the long reach of a national liberation trajectory, of which the Résistance was a key moment in its attempt to free the country and to move ahead with the project and promise of an ideal republic.
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  9.  8
    The Rhetorical Methodology of Perelman and Olbrechts-Tyteca’s Theory of Argumentation.Blake D. Scott - 2024 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 57 (1):1-29.
    ABSTRACT Despite Perelman and Olbrechts-Tyteca’s well-known influence on argumentation studies, it is striking that their theory of argumentation no longer stands out as a living project in the field. On the one hand, critics argue that their theory is inherently relativistic and therefore incapable of aiding argument evaluation. On the other hand, critics argue that, even as a descriptive theory, it fails to sufficiently justify its own systematic ambitions. This article addresses these dual concerns by returning to one of the (...)
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  10.  4
    Logos in the Flux of Life.Christopher W. Tindale - 2024 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 57 (1):103-111.
    ABSTRACT Since at least the work of Plato, the Western philosophical tradition has observed an ambition to detect fixed truths in the swirling movements of discourse. Related to this is the tension at the heart of our understandings of “argument,” a tension between a set of fixed propositions abstracted from the dynamic of human exchanges, and those exchanges themselves, alive with the uncertainties of experience. This article explores this tension with a view to recovering a sense of “argument” that stays (...)
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  11. The Discovery of the Idea of Movement.Donald Phillip Verene - 2024 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 57 (1):62-70.
    ABSTRACT That movement is associated with things both human and divine is as old as human experience. How does movement come to be formed as an idea, as an object of thought? For the answer we may turn to Aristotle’s De caelo, to Nicolas Oresme’s first graphic representation of movement in On Intensities, to Descartes’s essay on analytic geometry appended to his Discours de la méthode, and to Leibniz’s Monadologie as well as to Vico’s Scienza nuova and Hegel’s Phänomenologie des (...)
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  12.  1
    Figures of Entanglement: Diffractive Readings of Barad, New Materialism, and Rhetorical Theory and Criticism ed. by Christopher N. Gamble and Joshua S. Hanan (review). [REVIEW]Savannah Greer Downing - 2024 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 56 (3):395-402.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Reviewed by:Figures of Entanglement: Diffractive Readings of Barad, New Materialism, and Rhetorical Theory and Criticism ed. by Christopher N. Gamble and Joshua S. HananSavannah Greer DowningFigures of Entanglement: Diffractive Readings of Barad, New Materialism, and Rhetorical Theory and Criticism. Edited by Christopher N. Gamble and Joshua S. Hanan. Routledge, 2021. xvi + 122 pp. $168 (hardcover), $47.16 (electronic book). ISBN: 9780367903794.Rhetorical scholars have turned to various new materialist frameworks (...)
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  13. Scale Theory: A Nondisciplinary Inquiry by Joshua DiCaglio (review).S. Scott Graham - 2024 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 56 (3):388-394.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Reviewed by:Scale Theory: A Nondisciplinary Inquiry by Joshua DiCaglioS. Scott GrahamScale Theory: A Nondisciplinary Inquiry. By Joshua DiCaglio. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2021. 349 pp. Paperback: $30.00. ISBN: 978-1-5179-1207-9.Scale Theory embodies its title in every possible way. It offers both a deep dive into and a 10,000-foot view of scale, scalar thinking, and the role of scale in scientific inquiry. The subtitle, A Nondisciplinary Inquiry, is no less (...)
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  14.  1
    Kairos, The Sire of Beauty.SeungJung Kim - 2024 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 56 (3):274-286.
    Despite the common understanding of _kairos_ as a temporal concept, it also harbors a spatial notion that holds particular significance in relation to Greek visual arts. The inquiry into its primary role in the formation of aesthetic beauty requires a phenomenological reading of the Lysippan personification of the concept, as it resonates with its counterparts in the fields of philosophy, rhetoric, and medicine. Using Andrew Stewart's suggestion as a starting point—that the Lysippan Kairos may serve as the artist's manifesto, consciously (...)
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  15. Enlightenment Rhetoric Reconsidered: Hume's Discursive Transcendence in "Of Eloquence".Alexander W. Morales - 2024 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 56 (3):242-266.
    The phrase "Enlightenment rhetoric" typically denotes discourses bent on rejecting classical oratorical styles in favor of purportedly scientific ones. Likewise, scholars often associate Enlightenment rhetorical styles with the scientific epistemologies that emerged in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. This article reconsiders Enlightenment rhetoric by analyzing David Hume's 1742 essay "Of Eloquence." More specifically, the article argues that the Scottish Enlightenment context necessitated a rhetoric that compensated for the discursive limitations of new scientific worldviews. In so doing, the article argues that (...)
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  16. Kairos and Crisis: Responsibility and Time in Benjamin, Heidegger, and Tillich.Felix Ó Murchadha - 2024 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 56 (3):287-302.
    The sense of _kairos_ is of time as having an event-like character. Fundamental here is a split between quantitative time and a qualitatively distinct moment. The decisive moment connects the kairological to crisis. By exploring the accounts of _kairos_ in three contemporaries responding to the sense of crisis in 1920s Germany—Benjamin, Heidegger, and Tillich—this article shows the manner in action in the _kairos_ can be understood as both responsive and non-opportunist. Themes such as the "tiger leap" (Benjamin), the "moment of (...)
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  17.  2
    Guest Editor's Introduction: A Moment for Kairos.Tina Skouen - 2024 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 56 (3):267-273.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Guest Editor's Introduction:A Moment for KairosTina SkouenHow does one describe a crucial moment, a moment that calls for action? What kinds of time are opened, disclosed, or foreclosed in such moments? This section explores a concept that has a long history in rhetoric and philosophy, but which is urgently called for now, in a time that many think of as critical, catastrophic, or even apocalyptic. Changes in the economy, (...)
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  18. Kairos in Isocrates.Robert Sullivan - 2024 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 56 (3):303-319.
    This article describes the conceptualizations of the term _kairos_, generally taken to mean "the opportune moment," by Isocrates. Though Isocrates was instrumental in developing _kairos_ as a "quasi-technical" concept within the rhetorical art, his use of the word was highly nuanced and could be applied in one of three poles of meaning: (1) "circumstances"; (2) notions of the "appropriate"; and (3) "opportunity," an orientation of elements within a particular moment that either supplies or shuts off a path toward a strategic (...)
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