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  1.  2
    On the Ontological Turn in Economics: The Promises of Agent-Based Computational Economics.Shu-Heng Chen - 2020 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 50 (3):238-259.
    This article argues that agent-based modeling is the methodological implication of Lawson’s championed ontological turn in economics. We single out three major properties of agent-based computational economics, namely, autonomous agents, social interactions, and the micro-macro links, which have been well accepted by the ACE community. We then argue that ACE does make a full commitment to the ontology of economics as proposed by Lawson, based on his prompted critical realism. Nevertheless, the article also points out the current limitations or constraints (...)
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  2. Multilevel Modeling and the Explanatory Autonomy of Psychology.Wei Fang - 2020 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 50 (3):175-194.
    This article argues for the explanatory autonomy of psychology drawing on cases from the multilevel modeling practice. This is done by considering a multilevel linear model in personality and social psychology, and discussing its philosophical implications for the reductionism debate in philosophy of psychology. I argue that this practice challenges the reductionist position in philosophy of psychology, and supports the explanatory autonomy of psychology.
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  3.  1
    Organizations as Actors: Microfoundations of Organizational Intentionality.Daniel Little - 2020 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 50 (3):260-279.
    The article addresses the topic of “group agency” with respect to large organizations. It undertakes to analyze some of the concrete micro- and meso-level processes through which large organizations arrive at collective “knowledge” and “action.” The article makes use of the theory of strategic action fields to analyze processes of knowledge and the implementation of organizational intentions. The article describes some of the dysfunctions and disunities that should be expected from these individual-level processes, including principal–agent problems, conflicts of interests and (...)
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  4.  1
    Puzzled by Idealizations and Understanding Their Functions.Uskali Mäki - 2020 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 50 (3):215-237.
    Idealization is ubiquitous in human cognition, and so is the inclination to be puzzled by it: what to make of ideal gas, infinitely large populations, homo economicus, perfectly just society, known to violate matters of fact? This is apparent in social science theorizing, recent philosophy of science analyzing scientific modeling, and the debate over ideal and non-ideal theory in political philosophy. I will offer a set of concepts and principles to improve transparency about the precise contents of idealizations and their (...)
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  5.  2
    Mathematical Models and Robustness Analysis in Epistemic Democracy: A Systematic Review of Diversity Trumps Ability Theorem Models.Ryota Sakai - 2020 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 50 (3):195-214.
    This article contributes to the revision of the procedure of robustness analysis of mathematical models in epistemic democracy using the systematic review method. It identifies the drawbacks of robustness analysis in epistemic democracy in terms of sample universality and inference from samples with the same results. To exemplify the effectiveness of systematic review, this article conducted a pilot review of diversity trumps ability theorem models, which are mathematical models of deliberation often cited by epistemic democrats. A review of nine models (...)
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  6. Book Review: Contemporary Philosophy and Social Science: An Interdisciplinary Dialogue by Michiru Nagatsu and Attilia Ruzzene. [REVIEW]Raphael Sassower - 2020 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 50 (2):161-169.
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  7.  31
    Social Construction, HPC Kinds, and the Projectability of Human Categories.Jonathan Y. Tsou - 2020 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 50 (2):115-137.
    This paper addresses the question of how human science categories yield projectable inferences by critically examining Ron Mallon’s ‘social role’ account of human kinds. Mallon contends that human categories are projectable when a social role produces a homeostatic property cluster (HPC) kind. On this account, human categories are projectable when various social mechanisms stabilize and entrench those categories. Mallon’s analysis obscures a distinction between transitory and robust projectable inferences. I argue that the social kinds discussed by Mallon yield the former, (...)
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  8.  2
    Book Review: Raymond Aron’s Philosophy of Political Responsibility: Freedom, Democracy, and National Identity by Christopher Adair-Toteff. [REVIEW]Joseph Agassi - 2020 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 50 (1):82-88.
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  9.  20
    Book Review: Raymond Aron’s Philosophy of Political Responsibility: Freedom, Democracy, and National Identity by Christopher Adair-Toteff. [REVIEW]Joseph Agassi - 2020 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 50 (1):82-88.
    Philosophy of the Social Sciences, Ahead of Print.
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  10.  3
    Nomadic Concepts, Variable Choice, and the Social Sciences.Catherine Greene - 2020 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 50 (1):3-22.
    The observation that concepts used by social scientists are often problematic is not new; they have been described as Ballung concepts, cluster concepts, essentially contested, and reflexive; however, the need to work with these concepts remains. This article addresses the problem of variable choice in the social sciences by exploring and extending Woodward’s recommendations. This article demonstrates why Woodward’s criteria are difficult to apply in the social sciences and proposes an alternative, but complementary, framework for assessing variables.
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  11.  14
    On the Persistence of Social Groups.John D. Greenwood - 2020 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 50 (1):78-81.
    In this short discussion note, I cast doubt upon the common view that social groups persist throughout changes in their membership, by virtue of the maintenance of their structure and/or function. I offer two counterexamples, and consider two possible responses to a natural objection to them, neither of which support the view that it is a metaphysical truth that social groups persist through changes in their membership, or persist by virtue of the maintenance of their structure and/or function.
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  12.  3
    The Influence of Felix Kaufmann’s Methodology on Harold Garfinkel’s Ethnomethodology.Martyn Hammersley - 2020 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 50 (1):23-44.
    This paper examines the “methodology,” or philosophy of social science, developed by Felix Kaufmann in the second quarter of the 20th century, with the aim of determining its influence on the early work of the sociologist Harold Garfinkel. Kaufmann’s two methodology books are discussed, one written before, the other after, his migration from Austria to the United States. It is argued that Garfinkel took over Kaufmann’s conception of scientific practice: as a set of procedural rules or methods that determine whether (...)
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  13.  6
    Two Strands of Field Experiments in Economics: A Historical-Methodological Analysis.Michiru Nagatsu & Judith Favereau - 2020 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 50 (1):45-77.
    While the history and methodology of laboratory experiments in economics have been extensively studied by philosophers, those of field experiments have not attracted much attention until recently. What is the historical context in which field experiments have been advocated? And what are the methodological rationales for conducting experiments in the field as opposed to in the lab? This article addresses these questions by combining historical and methodological perspectives. In terms of history, we show that the movement toward field experiments in (...)
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