15 found

View year:

  1.  16
    Classroom as Crucible in the Humboldtian University: Reply to Collin.Steve Fuller - 2024 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 54 (3):226-230.
    This reply to Finn Collin’s critically sympathetic review of my Back to the University’s Future: The Second Coming of Humboldt, addresses some of the tensions involved in realizing “Humboldt 2.0” in today’s higher education environment. Its focus is largely on the academic’s sense of researcher as being one of learner. In other words, the Humboldtian sees research as the necessary complement to teaching, not something radically distinct from it.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2.  4
    Book Review: Economizing Our Lives. [REVIEW]Benjamin Santos Genta - 2024 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 54 (3):231-238.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3.  13
    Understanding the Power of China’s National Social Credit System: A Structural/Mechanism Explanation.William Zhengdong Hu - 2024 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 54 (3):203-225.
    As a promising Social Science Methodology, Structural/Mechanism Explanation (SME) retains the advantages of mechanism-based explanation (ME), particularly its focus on “identifying causal patterns from micro-level social phenomena.” It also acknowledging the role of “structure”—seen as “macro-level conditions”—in incentivizing or disincentivizing key mechanisms, thus proving valuable for forecasting their emergence and decline. This article explores the theory of SME and applies it to examine how a revitalized “Legalist political structure coupled with a Confucianist ideological structure” can forecast the mechanisms by which (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4.  1
    Rethinking Ontological Individualism.Daniel Little - 2024 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 54 (3):187-202.
    The paper offers a critique of ontological individualism as a framework for social ontology. The phrase gives unjustified priority to facts about individuals over facts about higher-level social features. The paper reviews several important contributions to more nuanced views, including Giddens, Archer, Granovetter, Mahoney, and Thelen. It is argued that our guiding “map” of the social world needs to reflect the unavoidable reciprocal dependency over time between individual actors and social entities. The ideas of methodological localism (Little) and the diachronic (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5.  7
    Book Review: A Social Philosophy of Science: An Introduction. [REVIEW]Jan Cornelius Schmidt - 2024 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 54 (3):239-244.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6.  2
    Book Review: Unintended Consequences and the Social Sciences: An Intellectual History. [REVIEW]Kei Yoshida - 2024 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 54 (3):245-251.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7.  3
    Book Review: Back to the University’s Future: The Second Coming of Humboldt. [REVIEW]Finn Collin - 2024 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 54 (2):181-183.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  8.  38
    Assessing Modern Monetary Theory’s Peculiar Ontology of Money.Brian Duricy & Maxwell G. Poitier - 2024 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 54 (2):133-150.
    Macroeconomic traditions disagree on the policies needed for the economy to properly function and how to assess them. In this paper, we contend that these disagreements originate from the social ontological commitments of a theory. The ontology of money underlines these disagreements between Modern Monetary Theory (MMT) and mainstream economics. First, we assess MMT’s ontology of money. Next, we identify MMT’s normative commitments and classify MMT’s ontology as a taxonomic definition with thick concepts. Finally, we offer reasons why MMT's ontology (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9.  18
    Book Review: Chinese Social Credit: Researches on Theory, Evidence and Countermeasures. [REVIEW]William Zhengdong Hu - 2024 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 54 (2):173-180.
  10.  27
    Conspiracy Theories and Anxiety in Culture: Why is Threat-Related Misinformation an Evolved Product of Our Ability to Mobilize Sources in the Face of Un-represented Threat?Martin Palecek & Václav Hampel - 2024 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 54 (2):99-132.
    This paper argues that the allure of conspiracy theories lies in their evolutionary origins, specifically in our capacity to communicate unrepresented threats. Drawing on threat-detection psychology and error management theory, it posits that these theories serve as adaptive responses to perceived threats and social coalition-building, rather than as flaws in reasoning.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11.  27
    Ontological Anti-Foundationalism in Sociology.Yannis Trophardy - 2024 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 54 (2):151-167.
    Social ontology studies the nature and properties of social reality while social metaontology examines the relationship between ontology and the social sciences, which is often treated as a normative question. However, social sciences themselves contain ontological theses, raising the descriptive question of how these internal ontologies relate to the rest of the social sciences. This paper argues that important parts of sociology have an anti-foundationalist metaontology. This descriptive claim is used to build a normative argument against foundationalism and is supported (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12.  13
    We Have Big Data, But Do We Need Big Theory? Review-Based Remarks on an Emerging Problem in the Social Sciences.Hermann Astleitner - 2024 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 54 (1):69-92.
    Big data represents a significant challenge for the social sciences. From a philosophy-of-science perspective, it is important to reflect on related theories and processes for developing them. In this paper, we start by examining different views on the role of theories in big data-related social research. Then, we try to show how big data is related to standards for evaluating theories. We also outline how big data affects theory- and data-based research approaches and the process of theory building. Discussions include (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13. Book Review: The Epistemology and Morality of Human Kinds. [REVIEW]Bálint Békefi - 2024 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 54 (1):93-95.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14.  7
    What Is Non-Inevitable?Abigail Klassen - 2024 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 54 (1):31-45.
    In this paper, I contend that the use of the notion of non-inevitability on the part of many social constructionists and non-social constructionists alike is either vague or relies too heavily on intuition. I propose two readings, namely the Dependence and Alterability Readings, to provide a principled criterion for determining whether and to what extent something may be argued to be non-inevitable. By utilizing the examples of gender and human emotion as case studies, my ultimate goals herein are not to (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15.  33
    Social Norms and Agent Types: Bridging the Gap Between the Theoretical Models and Their Applications.Vojtěch Zachník - 2024 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 54 (1):3-30.
    The paper presents a novel view of social norms that reflects the importance of different agent types, their specific motivations and roles. How one identifies with a role and behavioral options available to the agent is crucial for the sustainability of the social norms. The analysis of a simple case of social norm is suggested as a default model for analysis, and then the classification of subjects, enforcers, and audience is introduced. This triangular typology of agents is extended by introducing (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
 Previous issues
  
Next issues