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  1.  20
    Dimensions not types: On the phenomenology of premonitory urges in Tourette Syndrome.Lisa Curtis-Wendlandt & Jack Reynolds - 2024 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 35 (1):25-42.
    The use of philosophical phenomenology for conceptual debates in psychiatric nosology and psychopathology is beginning to be recognized. In this paper, we extend this trajectory to include Tourette Syndrome, focusing on so-called premonitory urges (PU) preceding Tourettic tics. We clarify some inconsistencies around typology in both phenomenological description and medical classification (i.e., in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th edition, Text Revision, International Classification of Diseases, 10th edition [World Health Organization, 2004], and the scales that elicit PU). (...)
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  2.  11
    Phenomenological Interviews and Tourette's.Lisa Curtis-Wendlandt & Jack Reynolds - 2024 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 31 (1):49-53.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Phenomenological Interviews and Tourette'sThe authors report no conflicts of interest.We appreciate the responses from the two clinicians, Efron and Mathieson. We agree with their reminder about the holistic nature of clinician's engagement (mood, sociality, and work life) and with their emphasis on patient-reported outcome measures, although this is not quite what we did in our interviews. As has recently been recognized in section 24 of the Victorian Mental Health (...)
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  3.  13
    Subjective Experiences of Tourette Syndrome: Beyond the Premonitory Urge.Daryl Efron, Ivan Mathieson & MClin Psych - 2024 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 31 (1):47-48.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Subjective Experiences of Tourette SyndromeBeyond the Premonitory UrgeThe authors report no conflicts of interest.There is an evolving recognition in healthcare that the patient's subjective experience needs to be privileged both in understanding clinical phenomena and also ensuring the salience of outcomes used to evaluate the impact of treatment interventions. This is reflected in the expansion of patient-reported outcome measures to capture a person's perception of their own health, and (...)
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  4.  9
    Priming and Narrative Habits in the Phenomenological Interview: Reflections on a Study of Tourette Syndrome.Anthony V. Fernandez - 2024 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 31 (1):43-45.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Priming and Narrative Habits in the Phenomenological InterviewReflections on a Study of Tourette SyndromeThe author reports no conflicts of interest.In "Dimensions, Not Types: On the Phenomenology of Premonitory Urges in Tourette Syndrome," Lisa Curtis-Wendlandt and Jack Reynolds provide new insights into some of the experiences characteristic of Tourette syndrome (TS). Their study is an excellent example of applied phenomenology (Burch, 2021), combining philosophy and qualitative research methods to illuminate (...)
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  5.  7
    Postmodern Assumptions of Philosophy of Psychiatry.S. Nassir Ghaemi - 2024 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 31 (1):17-19.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Postmodern Assumptions of Philosophy of PsychiatryThe author reports no conflicts of interest.This paper makes claims for relevance of philosophy to psychopathology, as inspired in part by the work of Karl Jaspers. Yet there is no such thing as philosophy, in a general sense; there are philosophies, or as Jaspers would prefer, there is philosophizing (Ehrlich & George, 1994; Jaspers, 1951). Jaspers' approach to philosophy was akin to Freud's approach (...)
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  6.  36
    Philosophy's Role in Theorizing Psychopathology.Quinn Hiroshi Gibson - 2024 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 31 (1):1-12.
    It is a mistake to think that any philosophical contribution to the study of psychopathology is otiose. I identify three non-exhaustive roles that philosophy can and does occupy in the study of mental disorder, which I call the agenda-setting role, the synthetic role, and the regulative role. The three roles are illustrated via consideration of the importance of Jaspers' notion of understanding and its application to specific examples of mental disorder, including delusions of reference, Capgras delusion and other monothematic delusions, (...)
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  7.  14
    Does Addiction Cause Addictive Behavior?Arthur Krieger - 2024 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 31 (1):79-88.
    Is addiction a behavioral pattern, or the underlying cause of a behavioral pattern? Both views are found in prominent accounts of addiction, but theorists generally do not notice that they are taking a controversial position, let alone justify it. A third possibility is that addiction consists in both addictive behavior and its causes, though this view is less obviously present in the literature. I argue that two important considerations favor the "cause view" over the "behavior" and "hybrid" views. The first (...)
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  8.  28
    Recovering One's Self from Psychosis: A Philosophical Analysis.Paul B. Lieberman - 2024 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 31 (1):67-70.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Recovering One's Self from PsychosisA Philosophical AnalysisThe author reports no conflicts of interest.Rosanna Wannberg (2024) has given us a dense but helpful introduction to certain philosophical questions raised by the fact that many patients recovering from psychotic illnesses describe their recovery in terms of gaining or regaining a 'sense of self' and a 'sense of agency,' which often involves acceptance of the 'fact' of being mentally ill, for example, (...)
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  9.  9
    How Narrative Counts in Phenomenological Models of Schizophrenia.Elizabeth Pienkos - 2024 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 31 (1):71-73.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:How Narrative Counts in Phenomenological Models of SchizophreniaThe author reports no conflicts of interest.Rosanna Wannberg (2024) offers an intriguing and novel critique of the predominant phenomenological model of schizophrenia, the ipseity disturbance hypothesis. According to this model, which was initially proposed by Sass and Parnas (2003), schizophrenia is best understood as arising from a disturbance or instability of minimal or basic self-hood, the sense of being present to oneself (...)
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  10.  22
    Philosophy's Role in Psychopathology Back to Jaspers and an Appeal to Grow Practical.Chloe Saunders - 2024 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 31 (1):13-15.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Philosophy's Role in Psychopathology Back to Jaspers and an Appeal to Grow PracticalThe author reports no conflicts of interest.In "Philosophy's role in theorizing psychopathology," Gibson presents a defense of the continued relevance of philosophy to psychopathology, and a non-exhaustive framework for the role of philosophy in this domain (Gibson, 2024). I find it hard to disagree that psychopathology is soaked in philosophy from its origins, and that to try (...)
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  11.  18
    The Social, the Outer and the Reflexive: Some More Dimensions of Subjectivity, Schizophrenia, and Its Recovery.Rosanna Wannberg - 2024 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 31 (1):75-78.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:The Social, the Outer and the ReflexiveSome More Dimensions of Subjectivity, Schizophrenia, and Its RecoveryThe author reports no conflicts of interest.First of all, I want to express my gratitude to the Association for the Advancement of Philosophy and Psychiatry, Philosophy, Psychiatry, & Psychology, and the Karl Jaspers Award Committee for their recognition of my paper "Institution or individuality? Some reflections on the lessons to be learned from personal accounts (...)
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  12.  11
    Institution or Individuality? Some Reflections on the Lessons To Be Learned From Personal Accounts of Recovery From Schizophrenia.Rosanna Wannberg - 2024 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 31 (1):55-66.
    In this paper, I argue for a social conception of subjectivity, via a philosophical reading of first-person accounts of recovery from schizophrenia, published in the _Schizophrenia Bulletin_. Following the hypothesis that these accounts exemplify a more general tension between, on the one hand, normative and social dimensions of the self, and on the other, experiential and psychological dimensions, the first section of the paper formulates the problem from a philosophical perspective inspired by Ludwig Wittgenstein's grammatical approach. The second section explores (...)
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  13. Affordances and the Shape of Addiction.Zoey Lavallee & Lucy Osler - 2024 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology.
    Research in the philosophy of addiction commonly explores how agency is impacted in addiction by focusing on moments of apparent loss of control over addictive behavior and seeking to explain how such moments result from the effects of psychoactive substance use on cognition and volition. Recently, Glackin et al. (2021) have suggested that agency in addiction can be helpfully analyzed using the concept of affordances. They argue that addicted agents experience addiction-related affordances, such as action possibilities relating to drugs, drug (...)
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