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  1.  25
    Racial Injustice and Information Flow.Eric Bayruns García - 2021 - Feminist Philosophy Quarterly 7 (4):1-18.
    I submit that the critical epistemology of race and standpoint literature has not explicitly focused on the properties of information about, say, racial or gender injustice in a way similar to how epistemologists have focused on propositions and information when they describe propositional justification. I describe information in the racial-injustice-information domain in a way similar to how epistemologists describe propositional justification. To this end, I argue (C1) that if subjects in racially unjust societies tend to violate norms that promote a (...)
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  2.  2
    Hermeneutical Backlash.B. R. George & Stacey Goguen - 2021 - Feminist Philosophy Quarterly 7 (4).
    In this paper we use the contemporary example of trans youth panics to introduce the notion of hermeneutical backlash, in which defenders of an established, unjust hermeneutical regime actively work to undermine and discredit hermeneutical liberation. We argue that the strategies and tropes of the trans youth panic illustrate a general propaganda vulnerability of epistemic liberation movements, and so are troubling for reasons that go beyond their application to trans youth. This exploration of a few specific cases of hermeneutical liberation (...)
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  3.  3
    Oppressive Praise.Jules Holroyd - 2021 - Feminist Philosophy Quarterly 7 (4).
    Philosophers have had a lot to say about blame, much less about praise. In this paper, I follow some recent authors in arguing that this is a mistake. However, unlike these recent authors, the reasons I identify for scrutinising praise are to do with the ways in which praise is, systematically, unjustly apportioned. Specifically, drawing on testimony and findings from social psychology, I argue that praise is often apportioned in ways that reflect and entrench existing structures of oppression. Articulating what (...)
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  4. On the Epistemology of Trigger Warnings.Anna Klieber - 2021 - Feminist Philosophy Quarterly 7 (4).
    Trigger warnings have been the flashpoints of many discussions in recent years. A prominent claim among those arguing against trigger warnings is what I will call the “coddling argument”, according to which trigger warnings coddle by allowing people to avoid ideas that they disagree with or find difficult. In this paper, I try to both make sense of and refute the coddling argument from a vice epistemological perspective. As I argue, CA is best understood as an expression of concern about (...)
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  5. Moralizing Hunger.Emma Atherton - 2021 - Feminist Philosophy Quarterly 7 (3).
    In this paper I examine and analyze the moral language surrounding food and eating in contemporary diet culture. I look to three dieting subcultures - 'thinspiration', 'fitspiration' and contemporary 'wellness' culture. I argue that the vocabularies of these three subcultures are on a continuum, in that their moralizing messages reflect and embody the same gendered and racialized social prohibitions, taboos, and normativity around food, eating, and bodies. All three dieting subcultures reflect and reproduce cultural fatphobia - the social and material (...)
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  6.  2
    Eating as a Self-Shaping Activity.Megan A. Dean - 2021 - Feminist Philosophy Quarterly 7 (3).
    This paper contends that eating shapes the self; that is, our practices and understandings of eating can cultivate, reinforce, or diminish important aspects of the self, including agency, values, capacities, affects, and self-understandings. I argue that these self-shaping effects should be included in our ethical analyses and evaluations of eating. I make a case for this claim through an analysis and critique of the hypothesis that young women’s vegetarianism is a risk, sign, or “cover” for eating disorders or disordered eating. (...)
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  7.  5
    Food Choices and Gut Issues.Jane Dryden - 2021 - Feminist Philosophy Quarterly 7 (3).
    People with gut issues are often constrained in the foods they are able to eat. The choices they are able to make about food, however, are shaped not merely by specific medical and dietary needs but also by social, relational, and environmental factors such as the presence of trusted and supportive others who take their needs seriously. Drawing on work in disability theory and relational autonomy, as well as interviews undertaken in summer 2019, the paper explores the ways that choices (...)
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  8. Attunement and Multispecies Communication in Fermentation.Maya Hey - 2021 - Feminist Philosophy Quarterly 7 (3).
    Terada Honke is a natural sake brewery that utilizes practices like call-and-response and work song to coordinate its fermentation processes across human and microbial participants. I call attention to the concept of attunement, which is the ability to notice, apprehend, and connect with others in meaningful response. Drawing on ethnographic fieldwork, I explain why brewers must attune to the social, spatial, and temporal scales of life within the brewhouse, including the microbes who remain invisible to the brewers. I then analyze (...)
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  9.  5
    Flourishing Is Mutual.Alexis Shotwell - 2021 - Feminist Philosophy Quarterly 7 (3).
    We are frequently enjoined to eat in one way or another in order to reduce harm, defeat global warming, or at least save our own health. In this paper, I argue that individualism about food saves neither ourselves nor the world. I show connections between what Lisa Heldke identifies as substance ontologies and heroic food individualism. I argue that a conception of relational ontologies of food is both more accurate and more politically useful than the substance ontologies offered to us (...)
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  10.  8
    If “Ifs” and “Buts” Were Candy and Nuts.Veronica Ivy - 2021 - Feminist Philosophy Quarterly 7 (2).
    It’s relatively easy to say that the debates about whether trans and intersex women athletes deserve full and equal inclusion in women’s sport is a contentious contemporary issue. I’ve already argued for the legal, ethical, and scientific basis for full and equal inclusion of trans and intersex women in women’s sport. In this paper, I want to analyze what I take to be a representative selection of recent arguments against full and equal inclusion of trans and intersex women in women’s (...)
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  11.  3
    Mary Daly’s Philosophy: Some Bergsonian Themes.Stephanie Kapusta - 2021 - Feminist Philosophy Quarterly 7 (2).
    The primary goal of this article is point out certain close parallels between some ideas of the radical feminist theorist Mary Daly and those of the French philosopher Henri Bergson. These similarities are particularly striking regarding distinctions made by both authors between two fundamentally contrasting types of cognitive faculty, of time and temporal experience, and of self and emotion. Daly departs from Bergson inasmuch as she employs these distinctions in her own way. She does not—like Bergson—employ them to depict the (...)
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  12. Hope, Solidarity, and Justice.Katie Stockdale - 2021 - Feminist Philosophy Quarterly 7 (2):1-23.
    This article defends an account of collective hope that arises through solidarity in the pursuit of justice. I begin by reviewing recent literature on the nature of hope. I then explore the relationship between hope and solidarity to demonstrate the ways in which solidarity can give rise to hope. I suggest that the hope born of solidarity is collective when it is shared by at least some others, when it is caused or strengthened by activity in a collective action setting, (...)
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  13.  17
    Mansplaining as Epistemic Injustice.Nicole Dular - 2021 - Feminist Philosophy Quarterly 7 (1).
    “Mansplaining” is by now part of the common cultural vernacular. Yet, academic analyses of it—specifically, philosophical ones—are missing. This paper sets out to address just that problem. Analyzed through a lens of epistemic injustice, the focus of the analysis concerns both what it is, and what its harms are. I argue it is a form of epistemic injustice distinct from testimonial injustice wherein there is a dysfunctional subversion of the epistemic roles of hearer and speaker in a testimonial exchange. As (...)
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  14.  18
    What Am I, a Piece of Meat? Synecdochical Utterances Targeting Women.Amanda McMullen - 2021 - Feminist Philosophy Quarterly 7 (1).
    In a September 2004 interview, Donald Trump agreed with Howard Stern’s statement that his daughter Ivanka is “a piece of ass.” This utterance is a synecdochical utterance targeting women, by which I mean that its form is such that a term for an anatomical part is predicated of, or could be used by a speaker to refer to, a woman. I propound a theory of what SUTW speakers do in undertaking an SUTW on which the SUTW speaker prompts the hearer (...)
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