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  1. Thomas Aquinas and Francisco Suarez on the Problem of Concurrence.Steven Baldner - 2016 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 90:149-161.
    Thomas and Suarez understand God’s creation and conservation in a similar way: as God’s continually giving being to all creatures. The two philosophers also try to explain the way in which creaturely, secondary causality is guaranteed, but they do so in radically different ways. Suarez’s doctrine of concurrence is not a progressive development of Thomas’s doctrine of secondary, instrumental causality, with which this Suarezian innovation is incompatible. I try to show how different concurrentism is from Thomas’s doctrine of secondary causality (...)
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  2. Aquinas: Justice as a Cardinal Virtue.R. E. Houser - 2016 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 90:187-200.
    This paper has two goals: 1) to understand justice as a cardinal virtue, according to Aquinas; and 2) to use his conception of justice as a cardinal virtue to understand how one engages in acts of “general” justice. The argument proceeds in four stages: 1) how Aquinas understands the virtues by looking to their “objects”; 2) the two distinct “modes” of the four cardinal virtues, as “general” and “specific” virtues; 3) the triangle of three kinds of justice, seen in terms (...)
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    Then and Now—A Thomistic Account of History.Timothy Kearns - 2016 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 90:243-259.
    Thomists do not have a standard account of history as a discipline or of historical knowledge in general. Since Thomism is a tradition of thought derived in part from historical figures and their works, it is necessary for Thomists to be able to say how we know what we know about those figures and their works. In this paper, I analyze the notion of history both in its contemporary senses and in how it was used by Aristotle and Aquinas. I (...)
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  4.  1
    Beginning and the Ending with Hestia: Finding a Home for Justice in Plato's Political Philosophy.Terence Sweeney - 2016 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 90:85-96.
    In my essay, I examine Plato’s understanding of justice and injustice within the home and the city. For Plato, the home, as private, must be suppressed to bring about a common polis. I critique Plato’s conclusions regarding the home and the city, especially his privative definition of justice, which loses the complexity of justice in-between persons, families, and communities. To critique Plato, I rely on his own doubts about his project, especially in his portrayal of the city of sows. The (...)
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    St. Thomas Aquinas on Original Justice and the Justice of Christ.Brandon L. Wanless - 2016 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 90:201-216.
    This paper discusses the theme of “personal justice” in the Summa theologiae, a concept inherited from the Nicomachean Ethics wherein Aristotle says that a man is just toward himself only metaphorically, insofar as the parts of man are appropriately ordered with the higher ruling the lower and the body subjugated to the soul. This paper demonstrates how Aquinas extensively utilizes this concept of metaphorical justice across the tripartite division of the Summa in his accounts of original justice in the prima (...)
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