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  1.  11
    IV—The Infliction of Subsistence Deprivations as a Perfect Crime.Elizabeth Ashford - 2018 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 118 (1):83-106.
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  2.  32
    I—The Presidential AddressPhilosophical Scepticism and the Aims of Philosophy.Helen Beebee - 2018 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 118 (1):1-24.
  3.  11
    III—Discrimination: The Good, the Bad, and the Wrongful.John Gardner - 2018 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 118 (1):55-81.
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  4.  11
    V—Forgiveness and Weak Agency.Laurent Jaffro - 2018 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 118 (1):107-125.
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  5.  27
    II—Fictional, Metafictional, Parafictional.François Recanati - 2018 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 118 (1):25-54.
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  6.  29
    VII—Naive Realism and Diaphaneity.Craig French - 2018 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society.
    Naïve Realists think that the ordinary mind-independent objects that we perceive are constitutive of the character of experience. Some understand this in terms of the idea that experience is diaphanous: that the conscious character of a perceptual experience is entirely constituted by its objects. My main goal here is to argue that Naïve Realists should reject this, but I’ll also highlight some suggestions as to how Naïve Realism might be developed in a non-diaphanous direction.
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