Australasian Philosophical Review

ISSNs: 2474-0500, 2474-0519

36 found

View year:

  1.  2
    For the Sake of Dasein: Praxis, Self-understanding, and Life.Bernardo Ainbinder - 2022 - Australasian Philosophical Review 6 (3):301-308.
    In his paper, Vardoulakis traces a genealogy of the concept of the ‘ineffectual’ that dominates many discussions in continental political philosophy back to Heidegger’s reading of Aristotle in the early 1920s. Although I sympathize with Vardoulakis’s suspicions concerning the ‘ineffectual’, I think his genealogy misses the main aspects of Heidegger’s analysis of praxis. In particular, Vardoulakis’s reading relies on two fundamentally ill-conceived assumptions: (a) that Heidegger’s thought can be read as a continuous endorsement of a series of fundamental claims, in (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  2.  3
    Introduction.Andrew Benjamin - 2022 - Australasian Philosophical Review 6 (3):219-219.
    The question of what it means to act has encountered two limitations. The first is the incorporation of actions within an instrumental logic. The second is the connection between action and what mi...
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3.  1
    Art Completes Nature’: Commentary on Dimitris Vardoulakis, ‘Toward a Critique of the Ineffectual.Martin Black - 2022 - Australasian Philosophical Review 6 (3):309-314.
    Vardoulakis’s ambitious work stems from his perception of the inability of Heidegger’s thought in particular, and of continental philosophy in general, to account for human action in the absence of an understanding of human ends. His specific contention is that this deficiency stems from a mistranslation of Aristotle by Heidegger, whereby Heidegger conflates the ends of phronesis with those of techne. Unfortunately, this contention is itself based on a mistranslation of the Greek. The true argument between Aristotle and Heidegger does (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  4. Willing the Means: Vardoulakis on Aristotle’s Ethics and Ineffectual Causation.Richard Lee - 2022 - Australasian Philosophical Review 6 (3):271-281.
    If we set aside the questions of Heidegger’s (mis)translation of Aristotle, Vardoulakis’s diagnosis of Heidegger’s mistake still is pressing and far-reaching. The mistake Vardoulakis identifies arises from a preference for ‘ineffectual’ activity over ends-directed activity in Heidegger’s thought. Vardoulakis’s argument is that even phronesis is ends-directed and it is only because of this that phronesis leads not just to doing something well but to doing something well for the sake of the good. The emphasis on the ineffectual turns us away (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  5. Affect Against Ineffect: Comments on Vardoulakis’s Idea of the ‘Ineffectual’.Lachlan Liesfield - 2022 - Australasian Philosophical Review 6 (3):295-300.
    In this commentary I respond to the claims of Dimitris Vardoulakis that, following a mistake of Heidegger in his translation of Aristotle and the apparent loss of phronêsis, post-war continental philosophy has abandoned instrumental rationality and the calculation of utility, instead valorizing an ‘action without ends’ and instituting a ‘new Kantianism’ in its ethics, politics, and ontology. I do so by presenting the thought of Gilles Deleuze as one identified in this tradition who fails to be characterized by Vardoulakis’s claims, (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  6. The End of Instrumentality? Heidegger on Phronēsis and Calculative Thinking.Ian Alexander Moore - 2022 - Australasian Philosophical Review 6 (3):255-261.
    The aim of Dimitris Vardoulakis’s paper, ‘Toward a Critique of the Ineffectual: Heidegger’s Reading of Aristotle and the Construction of an Action without Ends’, is to provide the foundation for a critique of aimless action by tracing its genesis to Heidegger’s putative misinterpretation of Aristotelian phronēsis (practical wisdom) in the 1920s. Inasmuch as ‘the ineffectual’—the name Vardoulakis gives to action devoid of ends—plays a crucial role in post-Heideggerian continental philosophy, he thereby seeks to diagnose and to provide an aetiology of (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  7.  1
    Heidegger on the Calculability of Time.Marilyn Stendera - 2022 - Australasian Philosophical Review 6 (3):282-287.
    In the lead article, Vardoulakis argues that Heidegger elides and occludes animportant difference between two senses of what it means for something to becalculable. On the one hand, there is‘that which can be calculated with somecertainty’, which Vardoulakis dubs the‘calculated’. On the other, there is‘calculating’, the process of proceeding‘even though we know that such acalculation can never be certain or secure as it lacks a determinate measurement’.Iwant to suggest, however, that such a distinction does play a significant role inHeidegger’s work, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  8.  1
    Aristotle’s End of Action in Itself and the Determination of Character: A Reply to Vardoulakis.Adriel M. Trott - 2022 - Australasian Philosophical Review 6 (3):262-270.
    This article responds to Dimitris Vardoulakis’s claim that Heidegger’s mistaken reading of phronēsis’s relation to the hou heneka, or that-for-the-sake-of-which, in Nicomachean Ethics VI at 1139a32–33, leads to an evacuation of ends from action. I argue that Heidegger is not wrong in his reading of Aristotle on phronēsis’s relation to the end. I offer a reading of the passage on which Vardoulakis focuses, which I believe is consistent with Heidegger’s, to show how Aristotle’s view of phronēsis’s role in action can (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  9.  1
    The Effectual: Replying to Responses.Dimitris Vardoulakis - 2022 - Australasian Philosophical Review 6 (3):315-325.
    1. The opening sentences of Being and Time (§1) indicate that, according to Heidegger, Plato and Aristotle raised the question of being. A page later, Heidegger asserts that Aristotle discovered th...
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10.  1
    Toward a Critique of the Ineffectual: Heidegger’s Reading of Aristotle and the Construction of an Action Without Ends.Dimitris Vardoulakis - 2022 - Australasian Philosophical Review 6 (3):220-245.
    The paper demonstrates how Heidegger constructed his notion of an action without ends, or the ineffectual, through his early readings of Aristotle. Heidegger initially aligns the ineffectual with the notion of phronesis in Nicomachean Ethics, and later develops it further in Division 2 of Being and Time. The paper examines some of the implications of the conception of an action without ends. It shows that in fact the notion is absent from Aristotle and it is inconsistent. Finally, the paper briefly (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  11. Ends Without a Cause: A Response to Dimitris Vardoulakis.Roland Végső - 2022 - Australasian Philosophical Review 6 (3):288-294.
    What does it mean to ‘calculate’—today? The pause introduced by the dash in this question marks the inescapable necessity of historicizing the problem of calculation. In his provocative essay, ‘Toward a Critique of the Ineffectual: Heidegger’s Reading of Aristotle and the Construction of an Action without Ends’, Dimitris Vardoulakis proposes a philosophical and political programme in order to counter the negative effects of ‘Heidegger’s mistake’ (the conflation of causality and instrumentality through a mistranslation of Aristotle) that has led to the (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  12. On Dimitris Vardoulakis, ‘Toward a Critique of the Ineffectual: Heidegger’s Reading of Aristotle and the Construction of an Action Without Ends’.Charlotta Weigelt - 2022 - Australasian Philosophical Review 6 (3):246-254.
    In my comments on Vardoulakis’s paper, I try to challenge the overall thrust of Vardoulakis’s argument, that Heidegger’s interpretation of Aristotle’s ethics rests on a fundamental mistake, an inability to recognize the instrumentality, or the relation between means and ends, that is fundamental to the concept of phronēsis. Against Vardoulakis’s supposition that Heidegger for his own part is in search of a conception of action without ends, I suggest that a major aim of Heidegger’s early work is to clarify the (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  13. Virtues and Values, Without Disproportion or Dysfunction.Simon Burgess - 2022 - Australasian Philosophical Review 6 (2):172-179.
    ABSTRACT Pettigrove advances a persuasive case against the proportionality principle. In my view, the moral respect that his modus operandi account of virtue affords to each person’s ‘characteristic way of being’ is also to be applauded. While various philosophers have come to believe in the proportionality principle, it is something that presupposes a monistic account of value. Moreover, it is readily arguable that the kind of abstraction that this involves provides nothing more than an illusion of understanding, and that any (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14.  1
    Commentary on Glen Pettigrove’s ‘What Virtue Adds to Value’.Bridget Clarke - 2022 - Australasian Philosophical Review 6 (2):129-138.
    ABSTRACT Glen Pettigrove wishes to accommodate the thought that exemplary instances of love, forgiveness and ambition need not be strictly proportional to the value present in their objects and that agents who are excellent may value the same things somewhat differently from one another or differently over time. To make room for these attractive ideas, he sketches an approach according to which (i) the virtuous agent’s particular modus operandi constitutes an important locus of value and (ii) the value of virtue (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15. Discriminate Virtue.Garrett Cullity - 2022 - Australasian Philosophical Review 6 (2):180-188.
    ABSTRACT Glen Pettigrove’s ‘What Virtue Adds to Value’ maintains that sometimes virtue is fundamental in the order of value, and that we should reject the general thesis that the value of our responses depends on their proportionality to the value of the objects toward which they are directed. He argues that this view is needed to account for the moral phenomena surrounding love, forgiveness and ambition. I object that his view is unable to explain the forms of discrimination that distinguish (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  16.  1
    Commentary on Glen Pettigrove’s ‘What Virtue Adds to Value’.Kristján Kristjánsson - 2022 - Australasian Philosophical Review 6 (2):139-147.
    ABSTRACT I focus on Pettigrove’s attack on the ‘proportionality principle’ of value, according to which our actions and attitudes ought to be proportioned to the degree of value present in an object, action, or event. I compare Pettigrove’s strong rejection of this principle with Aristotle's less radical view. There is no room in Aristotelian theory for a phronetic decision that does not take account of overall value. Yet how phronesis operates is clearly no mere utility calculus. What is clear is (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17. In Defence of the Proportionality Principle.Jörg Löschke - 2022 - Australasian Philosophical Review 6 (2):189-195.
    ABSTRACT Glen Pettigrove argues against the proportionality principle that it cannot accommodate important phenomena of our moral practice, namely forgiveness, love, and ambition: each of the cases involve pro- or contra-attitudes that are disproportionate to the intrinsic value or disvalue of their object. In this commentary, I offer alternative interpretations of forgiveness, love, and ambition and show that each of these phenomena is in line with the proportionality principle.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18. Help! Virtue Profiles and Horses for Courses.David Lumsden & Joseph Ulatowski - 2022 - Australasian Philosophical Review 6 (2):196-203.
    ABSTRACT Glen Pettigrove addresses the proportionality principle in ethics, the principle that ‘our actions, attitudes, or emotions should be proportional to the degree of value present in the object or events to which they are responding’. He argues this is inconsistent with some familiar features of common-sense morality. In response, he brings virtuous character into the picture, a move we support but wish to modify. We show that certain helping actions should be guided by whether one has the virtue profile (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19.  1
    What Virtue Adds to Value.Glen Pettigrove - 2022 - Australasian Philosophical Review 6 (2):113-128.
    ABSTRACT In virtually every corner of ethics—including discussions of value, practical reasoning, moral psychology, and justice—it is common for theorists to suggest that our actions, attitudes, or emotions should be proportional to the degree of value present in the objects or events to which they are responding. I argue that there is a fundamental problem with these approaches: they overlook the character of the agent and what it adds to the equation. I show that a commitment to proportionality is at (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  20.  1
    Creativity and the Value of Virtue.Glen Pettigrove - 2022 - Australasian Philosophical Review 6 (2):204-218.
    1. This is the second in a two-part investigation of the relationship between virtue and value. It focuses principally on two questions that part 1 [Pettigrove 2022] left readers asking.1 First, is...
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  21.  2
    Commentary on ‘What Virtue Adds to Value’.Andrew Pinsent - 2022 - Australasian Philosophical Review 6 (2):148-155.
    ABSTRACT Pettigrove’s paper argues strongly and effectively against a proportionality principle grounded on a univocal scale of value, and argues in favour of a kind of virtue ethics that is focused exclusively on the characteristic and non-univocal attitudes of the subject. In my critique, however, I point out that not all proponents of value ethics adhere to the proportionality principle and that the radical shift from object to subject has risks that were highlighted in a book by C. S. Lewis, (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  22.  1
    Introduction.Matheson Russell - 2022 - Australasian Philosophical Review 6 (2):111-112.
    Thanks to pioneering work in the mid to late twentieth century by the likes of Elizabeth Anscombe, Alasdair MacIntyre, Michael Slote, Philippa Foot, and Rosalind Hursthouse, virtue ethics has estab...
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23. What Does Virtue Add to Value? Comments on Pettigrove.Nancy E. Snow - 2022 - Australasian Philosophical Review 6 (2):156-163.
    ABSTRACT In this commentary, I delve into areas in which I agree as well as disagree with Glen Pettigrove’s interesting ideas. I am very much in agreement with his views about the limited use of the proportionality principle in attempting to explain what virtue adds to value. The main portion of his essay, however, lies in his treatment of three approaches purporting to explain how virtue adds to value: Hurka’s recursive theory; what Pettigrove calls the ‘response-dependent’ view; and his own (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24.  1
    Virtue, Dependence, and Value: Commentary on Glen Pettigrove's ‘What Virtue Adds to Value’.Rebecca Stangl - 2022 - Australasian Philosophical Review 6 (2):164-171.
    ABSTRACT According to one widely accepted view, our actions and emotions ought to be proportional to the degree of value present in their objects. Against this proportionality principle, Pettigrove sketches a view according to which the value of some virtuous actions and attitudes derives from the characteristic way of being of the agent herself, and not from any other goods that agent appreciates, pursues, or promotes. Granting Pettigrove’s rejection of the proportionality principle, I raise some questions for his replacement account. (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  25.  6
    Grace Andrus de Laguna’s New Naturalism.Randall Auxier - 2022 - Australasian Philosophical Review 6 (1):26-32.
    Joel Katzav's survey of the philosophy of Grace Andrus de Laguna's philosophy covers a broad range of ideas, and I have selected three for further development and commentary: (1) the relationship between naturalism and analytic philosophy, (2) the relationship between classical and radical empiricism, and (3) the historical question of where to situate a view such as de Laguna's in the history, the present, and the future of philosophy. I suggest that the view belongs with a group I call the (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  26.  1
    Grace de Laguna: Why Forgotten as a Philosopher?Sophia Connell - 2022 - Australasian Philosophical Review 6 (1):33-38.
    Grace de Laguna’s philosophical work was bold and original. She was also able to connect together seemingly disparate strands of the pragmatic, metaphysical and psychological research going on around her, as Joel Katzav shows in his paper. This commentary gives some historical background to her academic career in an attempt to explain how she could have been forgotten as a philosopher. Social and institutional factors led to her work not being recognized when she wrote and thus sinking into obscurity in (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  27.  7
    Grace A. de Laguna’s Theory of Universals: A Powers Ontology of Properties and Modality.A. R. J. Fisher - 2022 - Australasian Philosophical Review 6 (1):39-48.
    In this paper I examine Grace A. de Laguna’s theory of universals in its historical context and in relation to contemporary debates in analytic metaphysics. I explain the central features of her theory, arguing that her theory should be classified as a form of immanent realism and as a powers ontology. I then show in what ways her theory affords a theory of modality in terms of potentialities and discuss some of its consequences along the way.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  28. Grace de Laguna as a Grandmother of Analytic Philosophy: Her Philosophy of Science and A.N. Whitehead’s.Frederique Janssen-Lauret - 2022 - Australasian Philosophical Review 6 (1):49-58.
    In this paper I build a case for considering the pioneering behaviourist philosopher Grace de Laguna as one of the grandmothers of analytic philosophy. I argue against the ‘Great Men’ narrative of analytic philosophy as composed of Moore, Russell, Wittgenstein and their followers, and in favour of a more inclusive ‘movement’ narrative of analytic philosophy as a broad and varied movement with an anti-idealist and naturalistic orientation aimed at fitting around novel development in the sciences, including Einsteinian physics and psychology. (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  29. Grace de Laguna’s Analytic and Speculative Philosophy.Joel Katzav - 2022 - Australasian Philosophical Review 6 (1):6-25.
    This paper introduces the philosophy of Grace Andrus de Laguna in order to renew interest in it. I show that, in the 1910s and 1920s, she develops ideas and arguments that are also found playing key roles in the development of analytic philosophy decades later. Further, I describe her sympathetic, but acute, criticism of pragmatism and Heideggerian ontology, and situate her work in the tradition of American, speculative philosophy. Before 1920, we will see, de Laguna appeals to multiple realizability to (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  30.  84
    Response to Commentary on ‘Grace de Laguna’s Analytic and Speculative Philosophy’.Joel Katzav - 2022 - Australasian Philosophical Review 6 (1):98-109.
    I respond to the commentaries on 'Grace de Laguna's Analytic and Speculative Philosophy' offered by Peter Olen [2023], Trevor Pearce, Anthony Fisher, Marguerite La Caze and Frederique Janssen-Lauret. In doing so, I bring out some of the value of de Laguna’s perspectivism and of her treatment of modality. I also further clarify how she departs from pragmatism and from analytic philosophy, and how she relates to continental philosophy.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  31.  2
    Grace de Laguna as Continental Philosopher?Marguerite La Caze - 2022 - Australasian Philosophical Review 6 (1):59-67.
    Joel Katzav’s article describes and explains the realist perspectivist views of Grace de Laguna, showing the distinctiveness of her positions in a number of fields. My focus will be on her views of the self and persons, and how they are embedded in their communities, experience emotions, and develop morality. As Katzav outlines, de Laguna’s position can be characterized as a form of speculative philosophy that develops an ontology of modes of being. Katzav sees speculative philosophy and naturalism intertwining in (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  32.  8
    Grace Andrus de Laguna: A Perspective from the History of Linguistics.Brigitte Nerlich - 2022 - Australasian Philosophical Review 6 (1):68-77.
    Grace de Laguna was a philosopher working in the first part of the twentieth century on analytic and speculative philosophy, as well as on the psychology and philosophy of language, especially the social function of language. Joel Katzav’s lead essay focuses mainly on the former part of her work, while my commentary focuses mostly on the latter. Katzav shows how her work played a role in the development of analytic philosophy, I try to show how her work played a role (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  33.  1
    Perspectivism and Behaviourism: A Response to Katzav.Peter Olen - 2022 - Australasian Philosophical Review 6 (1):78-87.
    My response to Joel Katzav’s original article looks at potentially competing claims about perspectivism, psychology, and our understanding of concrete experience. De Laguna offers an early example of pluralism when conceiving of psychology, biology, physiology, and other sciences as essentially different perspectives abstracted from our experience of the world. Each science serves as a single perspective on experience, one that may shed light on our experience and behaviour from a particular standpoint, but does not represent ‘the real’ over and above (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  34.  7
    Grace de Laguna’s Evolutionary Critique of Pragmatism.Trevor Pearce - 2022 - Australasian Philosophical Review 6 (1):88-97.
    This commentary aims to place Grace de Laguna’s critique of pragmatism in its historical context. It examines her 1904 response to Henry Heath Bawden, her 1909 attack on John Dewey’s immediate empiricism, and her 1910 book Dogmatism and Evolution, focusing on the following question: Why did she describe her approach as an attempt to complete the pragmatists’ Darwinian revolution in logic?
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  35. Introduction.Krist Vaesen & Dorothy Rogers - 2022 - Australasian Philosophical Review 6 (1):1-5.
    1. With his lead article on Grace Mead (Andrus) de Laguna, Joel Katzav [2022a] has initiated a valuable addition to recent discussions of women in the history of philosophy. De Laguna was one of se...
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  36.  10
    Evidentialism about Faith and the Justification Encroachment Dilemma.Alex R. Gillham - 2022 - Australasian Philosophical Review 5 (1):62-66.
    In this paper, I develop what I call the Justification Encroachment (JE) Dilemma for Dormandy’s Evidentialism about Faith (EaF). The dilemma is this. If JE is true, then belief about objects of faith will be very difficult to justify, perhaps even impossible. If JE is false, then beliefs about objects of faith require no greater justification than any other belief, so that faith requires no more respect for evidence than anything else. After developing each horn, I consider very briefly how (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
 Previous issues
  
Next issues