16 found

Year:

  1.  35
    Why Images Cannot be Arguments, But Moving Ones Might.Marc Champagne & Ahti-Veikko Pietarinen - 2020 - Argumentation 34 (2):207-236.
    Some have suggested that images can be arguments. Images can certainly bolster the acceptability of individual premises. We worry, though, that the static nature of images prevents them from ever playing a genuinely argumentative role. To show this, we call attention to a dilemma. The conclusion of a visual argument will either be explicit or implicit. If a visual argument includes its conclusion, then that conclusion must be demarcated from the premise or otherwise the argument will beg the question. If (...)
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  2.  3
    Argumentative Use and Strategic Function of the Expression ‘Not for Nothing’.Henrike Jansen & Francisca Snoeck Henkemans - 2020 - Argumentation 34 (2):143-162.
    In English discourse one can find cases of the expression ‘not for nothing’ being used in argumentation. The expression can occur both in the argument and in the standpoint. In this chapter we analyse the argumentative and rhetorical aspects of ‘not for nothing’ by regarding this expression as a presentational device for strategic manoeuvring. We investigate under which conditions the proposition containing the expression ‘not for nothing’ functions as a standpoint, an argument or neither of these elements. It is also (...)
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  3.  11
    How do Culture, Individual Traits, and Context Influence Koreans’ Interpersonal Arguing? Toward a More Comprehensive Analysis of Interpersonal Arguing.Youllee Kim, Sungeun Chung & Dale Hample - 2020 - Argumentation 34 (2):117-141.
    This research explores the dynamics of interpersonal arguing in South Korea by considering cultural influence, individual traits, and contexts. In a cross-cultural study where Koreans were compared to U.S. Americans on basic measures of argument orientations, several interesting contrasts emerged, along with considerable similarity. Koreans evaluated conflicts more positively than Americans even though they were more worried about the relational consequences of arguing. Within the Korean sample, sex difference was pronounced. Study 2 found that power distance orientation was critical individual-level (...)
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  4.  14
    Argumentation in Mencius: A Philosophical Commentary on Haiwen Yang’s The World of Mencius.Zezhen Niu & Shuhong Zheng - 2020 - Argumentation 34 (2):275-284.
    This article is intended to discuss the issue of argumentation in Mencius in the form of book review, focusing on Haiwen Yang’s newly released monograph The World of Mencius. Unlike many scholars who are inclined to see the argumentations included in the book of Mencius in the light of logical debate, Yang attempts to embed Mencius in his social network, so as to reconstruct a “vivid” and “real” Mencius as lived in his own historical context. Yang’s narrative is characterized by (...)
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  5.  17
    Correction to: Comment on ‘Constrained Maneuvering: Rhetoric as a Rational Enterprise’.Peter J. Schulz - 2020 - Argumentation 34 (2):285-285.
    In the original publication of the article, the commentary of mine to Christopher Tindale’s article ‘Constrained Maneuvering: Rhetoric as a Rational Enterprise’, English translations of phrasings regarding several distinctions in the concept of rationality were taken from Stefan Gosepath’s book Aufgeklärtes Eigeninteresse: Eine Theorie theoretischer und praktischer Rationalität, Frankfurt: Suhrkamp 1992, without providing reference to his publication.
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  6.  6
    Argumentation Evolved: But How? Coevolution of Coordinated Group Behavior and Reasoning.Fabian Seitz - 2020 - Argumentation 34 (2):237-260.
    Rational agency is of central interest to philosophy, with evolutionary accounts of the cognitive underpinnings of rational agency being much debated. Yet one building block—our ability to argue—is less studied, except Mercier and Sperber’s argumentative theory :57–74, https://doi.org/10.1017/s0140525x10000968, 2011, in The enigma of reason. Harvard University Press, Cambridge, 2017). I discuss their account and argue that it faces a lacuna: It cannot explain the origin of argumentation as a series of small steps that reveal how hominins with baseline abilities of (...)
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  7.  8
    Dialectical Models of Deliberation, Problem Solving and Decision Making.Douglas Walton, Alice Toniolo & Timothy J. Norman - 2020 - Argumentation 34 (2):163-205.
    Hamblin distinguished between formal and descriptive dialectic. Formal normative models of deliberation dialogue have been strongly emphasized as argumentation frameworks in computer science. But making such models of deliberation applicable to real natural language examples has reached a point where the descriptive aspect needs more interdisciplinary work. The new formal and computational models of deliberation dialogue that are being built in computer science seem to be closely related to some already existing and very well established computing technologies such as problem (...)
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  8.  11
    Definite Descriptions in Argument: Gettier’s Ten-Coins Example.Yussif Yakubu - 2020 - Argumentation 34 (2):261-274.
    In this article, I use Edmund Gettier’s Ten Coins hypothetical scenario to illustrate some reasoning errors in the use of definite descriptions. The Gettier problem, central as it is to modern epistemology, is first and foremost an argument, which Gettier :121–123, 1963) constructs to prove a contrary conclusion to a widely held view in epistemology. Whereas the epistemological claims in the case have been extensively analysed conceptually, the strategies and tools from other philosophical disciplines such as analytic philosophy of language, (...)
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  9.  10
    An Early Renaissance Altarpiece by Domenico Veneziano: A Case of Visual Argumentation?Antonio Rossini - 2020 - Argumentation 34 (1):39-53.
    The purpose of this paper is to show the argument-establishing features of a Renaissance altarpiece. Looking to Panofsky’s seminal studies and to more recent contributions, this essay shows how in a special environment like the Florentine pre-Renaissance, people could easily relate to the evocative and contrastive potential of images. In the Santa Lucia de’ Magnoli Altarpiece painted by Domenico Veneziano we see an interesting dialogue between the main piece and the predella panels. This juxtaposition can be formalized into a basic (...)
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  10.  8
    Arguing Terror.Philippe-Joseph Salazar - 2020 - Argumentation 34 (1):101-115.
    The Caliphate of the Islamic State developed a complex system of online argumentation that mediated and spanned the whole spectrum of jihadist literacy, from glossy magazines to short messages on social networks, from combattant letters to multimedia postings, and from chants to battle-field harangues and sermons. The overall effect was “terrifying” in the etymological sense of the word as arguments served to establish a unique intellectual “territory” that redoubled the physical one. It was molded by a sustained rhetoric that incorporated (...)
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  11.  19
    Argumentation and the Challenge of Time: Perelman, Temporality, and the Future of Argument.Blake D. Scott - 2020 - Argumentation 34 (1):25-37.
    Central to Perelman and Olbrechts-Tyteca’s philosophical revival of rhetoric and dialectic is the importance given to the temporal character of argumentation. Unlike demonstration, situated within the “empty time” of a single instant, the authors of The New Rhetoric understand argumentation as an action that unfolds within the “full time” of meaningful human life. By taking a broader view of his work beyond The New Rhetoric, I first outline Perelman’s understanding of time and temporality and the challenge that it poses for (...)
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  12.  17
    On the Puzzling Death of the Sanctity-of-Life Argument.Katharina Stevens - 2020 - Argumentation 34 (1):55-81.
    The passage of time influences the content of the law and therefore also the validity of legal arguments. This is true even for charter-arguments, despite the widely held view that constitutional law is made to last. In this paper, I investigate the reason why the sanctity-of life argument against physician assisted suicide lost its validity between the Supreme Court decision in Rodriguez v. British Columbia in 1993 and Carter v. Canada in 2015. I suggest that a rhetorical approach to argument (...)
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  13.  8
    Introduction: Of Place and Time.Christopher W. Tindale - 2020 - Argumentation 34 (1):1-11.
    I introduce the two principal concepts of this special issue through a discussion of some of the main roles place and time play in argumentation and some of the meanings involved in those roles. Some of the definitions of kairos are explored leading to suggestions for how this concept and that of ‘place’ can operate in argumentation.
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  14.  7
    Place as Argument.Andrés Vélez-Posada - 2020 - Argumentation 34 (1):13-23.
    Inspired by studies about the history and anthropology of knowledge, this text addresses the question of how places are constitutive of the process of argumentation. The argument from place that is presented in classical rhetoric handbooks, particularly in Quintilian, is used as a model of analysis in order to emphasise the situated character of argumentative processes. Both the attention to the place from which an argument is uttered and to the place to which the argument refers are useful guides that (...)
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  15.  6
    Place, Image and Argument: The Physical and Nonphysical Dimensions of a Collective Ethos.Jianfeng Wang - 2020 - Argumentation 34 (1):83-99.
    “Place” as an argumentative domain, which has been taken for granted and treated by theorists of argumentation simply as a physical notion designating the occasion where an argumentation takes place, carries far more complex meanings beyond its traditionally assumed domain in the following three dimensions: as a geographical locale; as a concept, an idea, a history or a notion with its own disputable narratives and presumptions; and as an imaginative geography. Similarly, an image or a character projected through argumentative discourse (...)
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  16.  1
    Place, Image and Argument: The Physical and Nonphysical Dimensions of a Collective Ethos.Jianfeng Wang - 2020 - Argumentation 34 (1):83-99.
    “Place” as an argumentative domain, which has been taken for granted and treated by theorists of argumentation simply as a physical notion designating the occasion where an argumentation takes place, carries far more complex meanings beyond its traditionally assumed domain in the following three dimensions: as a geographical locale; as a concept, an idea, a history or a notion with its own disputable narratives and presumptions; and as an imaginative geography. Similarly, an image or a character projected through argumentative discourse (...)
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