SATS

ISSNs: 1600-1974, 1869-7577

12 found

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  1.  2
    Cocks on Dunghills – Wollstonecraft and Gouges on the Women’s Revolution.Alan Coffee & Sandrine Bergès - 2022 - SATS 23 (2):135-152.
    While many historians and philosophers have sought to understand the ‘failure’ of the French Revolution to thrive and to avoid senseless violence, very few have referred to the works of two women philosophers who diagnosed the problems as they were happening. This essay looks at how Mary Wollstonecraft and Olympe de Gouges theorised the new tyranny that grew out of the French Revolution, that of ‘petty tyrants’ who found themselves like ‘cocks on a dunghill’ able to wield a new power (...)
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  2. Affectivity in Media-Based Public Discussions: A Critical Phenomenological Analysis.Minna-Kerttu Maarja Kekki - 2022 - SATS 23 (2):153-173.
    Affectivity has become an operative concept for a variety of analyses of our everyday media-based public communications. However, it often remains unclear what affectivity is and how it can be used for analysing media-based public discussions. To clarify the role of affectivity in such analyses, I take a look back to the classical phenomenological analyses of affectivity provided by Edmund Husserl. I argue that based on Husserl’s analyses, affectivity is essentially a relation between the object and the affected subject evoking (...)
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  3. The Stoic Theory of Sign and the Semantic Modulation of Models.Miguel López-Astorga - 2022 - SATS 23 (2):191-201.
    The theory of mental models is a current cognitive approach trying to describe the way people make inferences. According to this theory, people reason from possibilities or models linked to sentences. Sometimes, such possibilities or models are transformed by the action of a semantic modulation. The point this paper is intended to make is that Stoic logic also has the machinery to explain semantic processes such as that of modulation. This is shown by means of the criterion Chrysippus of Soli (...)
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  4. Rationalizing: Kant on Moral Self-Deception.Jörg Noller - 2022 - SATS 23 (2):175-189.
    Kant’s moral philosophy is challenged by the so-called “Socratic Paradox”: If free will and pure practical reason are to be identified, as Kant argues, then there seems to be no room for immoral actions that are to be imputed to our individual freedom. The paper argues that Kant’s conception of rationalizing helps us to avoid the Socratic Paradox, and to understand how immoral actions can be imputed to our individual freedom and responsibility. In rationalizing, we misuse our capacity of reason (...)
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  5.  2
    Who Should Have Children? (Us?) When Should We Have Children?Ondřej Beran - 2022 - SATS 23 (1):55-74.
    This paper has two main parts. First, it overviews the topic of environmental grief and related emotions. Specifically, it stresses the need to think of emotions in at least partly cognitive terms and to consider an existential rather than medical account of environmental emotions. The second part is a reflection on the currently endemic worries about having children. I will argue that it is misplaced to analyse this attitude universally as an argument-based decision. Rather, if it relates to environment grief, (...)
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  6.  9
    Justificatory Moral Pluralism in Climate Change.Andre Santos Campos & Sofia Guedes Vaz - 2022 - SATS 23 (1):75-96.
    This paper adopts justificatory moral pluralism – a multilevel framework for justifying the choice by different agents of the most appropriate norms and values to guide their decisions and actions – to climate change. Its main objective is to investigate how ethics may effectively help achieve a better result in deciding how to mitigate, adapt, or compensate by enhancing the moral acceptability of the available policies or actions that are most likely to counter the effects of climate change. JMP presents (...)
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  7.  1
    Environmental Ethics–Sats Special Issue.Nina Janasik & Nora Hämäläinen - 2022 - SATS 23 (1):1-4.
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  8.  1
    The Appeal of Environmental Master Metrics.Ville Lähde - 2022 - SATS 23 (1):5-15.
    Environmental problems are a legion, and of radically differing kinds. Yet the notion of a unified environmental crisis persists. Such unification has a solid basis, firstly because all areas of the world are interwoven into a global system of extraction, production, trade and consumption. Secondly, diverse environmental problems interact in many ways. However, too often this slips into problematic totalization, ignoring the important local socio-ecological specificities. The search for environmental master metrics, the attempt to find common units of measurement for (...)
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  9.  8
    Moomins and Complicity with Matter: Tove Jansson’s Moominpappa at Sea as an Intervention in Vibrant Matter: A Political Ecology of Things by Jane Bennett.Arwen Dagmar Meereboer - 2022 - SATS 23 (1):17-32.
    As humans we are constantly engaging not only with other humans but with plants, animals, and matter. This article examines the way we view our engagement with the materiality of the world around us, by looking at the work of philosopher Jane Bennet on vibrant materiality and author Tove Jansson. Bennet presents an argument that matter can be analysed as active and vibrant. While Western philosophers are used to viewing matter as passive and dead, seeing it as active makes space (...)
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  10.  5
    Weird Environmental Ethics: The Virtue of Wonder and the Rise of Eco-Anxiety.Brian Hisao Onishi - 2022 - SATS 23 (1):33-53.
    Recent discussions of “eco-anxiety” have brought attention to feelings of hopelessness and despair associated with climate change and ecological disaster. When we accept the claims made by science about climate change and realize that our near future is full of unprecedented ecological crisis it is difficult to avoid feelings of anxiety about the future of human life on our planet. While these discussions have largely taken place in the context of psychology and psychoanalysis, there is a need to engage in (...)
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  11.  4
    Towards Anthropocentric Deep Ecology: Utilizing Esotericism Within Ecophilosophy.Olli Petteri Pitkänen - 2022 - SATS 23 (1):117-133.
    This article has a twofold aim. First it is shown, based on Joseph Christopher Greer’s earlier analysis, that there is a close historical, and to some extent substantial, affinity between deep ecology and esotericism. Greer’s findings will be corroborated by applying three different definitions of esotericism to the question at hand. Second, based on Sean McGrath’s ecophilosophy, it will be argued that utilizing esoteric influences systematically in deep ecological context can help deep ecology to avoid some problematic aspects it is (...)
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  12.  16
    Concepts of Biodiversity, Pluralism, and Pragmatism: The Case of Walnut Forest Conservation in Central Asia.Elena Popa - 2022 - SATS 23 (1):97-116.
    This paper examines philosophical debates about concepts of biodiversity, making the case for conceptual pluralism. Taking a pragmatist perspective, I argue that normative concepts of biodiversity and eco-centric concepts of biodiversity can serve different purposes. The former would help stress the values of local communities, which have often been neglected by both early scientific approaches to conservation, and by policy makers prioritizing the political or economic interests of specific groups. The latter would help build local research programs independent of pressures (...)
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