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  1.  1
    Introduction.Julian Baggini - 2022 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 91:1-13.
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  2. For State-Funded Inter-Religious Education.Rajeev Bhargava - 2022 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 91:25-37.
    In this paper I address the vexed question of the relationship between secular states and religious education.
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  3.  4
    In Defense of Anti-Racist Training.Myisha Cherry - 2022 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 91:15-24.
    I will argue for anti-racist training in federal and state funded programs. In order to do so, I will begin by discussing recent events occurring in the United States that have challenged such training. I will analyze criticisms of anti-racist programs, focusing particularly on those that began with the Trump administration and continue today. I will then consider what is happening in response and as a result of these criticisms, as well as make some suggestions for what should happen going (...)
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  4.  1
    The Public Option.Diane Coyle - 2022 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 91:39-52.
    People value highly the digital technologies that are so pervasive in everyday life and work, certainly as measured by economists. Yet there are also evident harms associated with them, including the likelihood that they are affecting political discourse and choices. The features of digital markets mean they tend toward monopoly, so great economic and political power lies in the hands of a small number of giant companies. While tougher regulation may be one way to tackle the harms they create, it (...)
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  5.  3
    On the Merits and Limits of Nationalising the Fossil Fuel Industry.Fergus Green & Ingrid Robeyns - 2022 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 91:53-80.
    We explore the desirability of an idea that has not received the attention it deserves by political philosophers: that governments should bring privately-owned fossil fuel companies into public ownership with a view to managing their wind-down in the public interest – often simply referred to as ‘nationalising the fossil fuel industry’. We aim to make a conditional case for public ownership of fossil fuel companies. We will assume certain conditions about government motivations and capacities that are similar to assumptions made (...)
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  6.  2
    Individual Freedom in the Post-Corona Era.Heisook Kim - 2022 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 91:245-257.
    In this essay, I examine the concept of individual freedom that varies depending on cultures through different attitudes toward the administrative policy of wearing masks. Many Westerners criticized the enforcement of the policy in East Asia as the oppression of individual freedom. I argue that the criticism is based on a narrow understanding of the problem and that individual freedom becomes obscure even in the West as we are entering the society of surveillance capitalism due to technological revolution. Confucian cultures (...)
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  7.  5
    Membership Rights for Animals.Will Kymlicka - 2022 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 91:213-244.
    It is increasingly acknowledged that animals have an intrinsic moral status, in part due to the influential work of many moral philosophers. However, surprisingly little has been written by philosophers on whether animals are owed social membership and the rights that attach to membership in society. In this paper, I explore why the idea of social membership matters, particularly in relation to domesticated animals, and how it can guide legal and political reforms. Focusing on social membership identifies neglected avenues for (...)
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  8.  30
    A Reconciliation Theory of State Punishment: An Alternative to Protection and Retribution.Thaddeus Metz - 2022 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 91:119-139.
    I propose a theory of punishment that is unfamiliar in the West, according to which the state normally ought to have offenders reform their characters and compensate their victims in ways the offenders find burdensome, thereby disavowing the crime and tending to foster improved relationships between offenders, their victims, and the broader society. I begin by indicating how this theory draws on under-appreciated ideas about reconciliation from the Global South, and especially sub-Saharan Africa, and is distinct from the protection and (...)
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  9. The Wisdom of Mentor.Jesse Norman - 2022 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 91:271-280.
    Thomas Hobbes posited a social contract which legitimates sovereign authority. But what grounds, or could ground, such a contract? Through reflection on Oakeshott, and on Aristotle's Nichomachean Ethics, the paper argues for a so far unrecognised mode of human association: philic association. It briefly considers a possible expression of philic association in the history of English law, before making the case for programmes of mentoring as a policy both reflective and supportive of this mode. It ends by suggesting that the (...)
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  10.  3
    Radical Democratic Inclusion: Why We Should Lower the Voting Age to 12.Martin O'Neill - 2022 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 91:185-212.
    Democratic societies such as the United Kingdom have come to fail their young citizens, often sacrificing their interests in a political process that gives much greater weight to the preferences and interests of older citizens. Against this background of intergenerational injustice, this article presents the case for a shift in the political system in the direction of radical democratic inclusion of younger citizens, through reducing the voting age to 12. This change in the voting age can be justified directly, with (...)
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  11.  1
    Philosophical Reflections on the Idea of a Universal Basic Income.Catherine Rowett - 2022 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 91:81-102.
    A universal basic income is an unconditional allowance, sufficient to live on, paid in cash to every citizen regardless of income. It has been a Green Party policy for years. But the idea raises many interesting philosophical questions, about fairness, entitlement, desert, stigma and sanctions, the value of unpaid work, the proper ambitions of a good society, and our preconceptions about whether leisure or jobs are the thing we should prize above all for free citizens. Coming from the perspective of (...)
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  12.  3
    In Defense of A Mandatory Public Service Requirement.Debra Satz - 2022 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 91:259-269.
    This paper defends mandatory national service as a response to democratic decay. Because democracy cannot be maintained by laws and incentives alone, citizens must care about the quality and attitudes of their society's members. In an age of increasing segregation and conflict on the basis of class and race, national service can bring citizens from different walks of life together to interact cooperatively on social problems. It offers a form of ‘forced solidarity’. The final sections of the paper consider objections (...)
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  13. No More Benefit Cheats.Jonathan Wolff - 2022 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 91:103-118.
    The concept of the ‘benefit cheat’ plays a critical role in political rhetoric and public policy and it has been deployed to justify changes to the benefit system that have had a very negative impact on well being and justice. The authors argue that the concept is dangerous, adding to the existing burdens of poverty and exclusion and that it must be eradicated by a reorganisation of the welfare system. Dignity and a spirit of equality must be the starting point (...)
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  14. How Should Liberal Democratic Governments Treat Conscientious Disobedience as a Response to State Injustice?: A Proposal.Brian Wong & Joseph Chan - 2022 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 91:141-167.
    This paper suggests that liberal democratic governments adopt a reconciliatory approach to conscientious disobedience. Central to this approach is the view – independent of whether conscientious disobedience is always morally justified – that conscientious disobedience is normatively distinct from other criminal acts with similar effects, and such distinction is worthy of acknowledgment by public apparatus and actors. The prerogative applies to both civil and uncivil instances of disobedience, as defined and explored in the paper. Governments and courts ought to take (...)
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  15.  2
    Irregular Migration, Historical Injustice and the Right to Exclude.Lea Ypi - 2022 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 91:169-183.
    This paper makes the case for amnesty of irregular migrants by reflecting on the conditions under which a wrong that is done in the past can be considered superseded. It explores the relation between historical injustice and irregular migration and suggests that we should hold states to the same stringent standards of compliance with just norms that they apply to the assessment of the moral conduct of individual migrants. It concludes that those standards ought to orient migrants and citizens’ moral (...)
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