Results for 'Gerald Moore'

(not author) ( search as author name )
1000+ found
Order:
  1.  15
    Politics of the Gift.Gerald Moore - 2011 - Edinburgh University Press.
    Gerald Moore shows how the problematic of the gift drives and illuminates the last century of French philosophy.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  2. Politics of the Gift: Exchanges in Poststructuralism. By Gerald Moore. Edinburgh, Edinburgh University Press, 2011, $97.12. [REVIEW]Dane Neufeld - 2014 - Heythrop Journal 55 (4):749-750.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3.  14
    GE Moore and Political Philosophy: Gerald F. Shove's Fellowship Dissertation (1911).Daniela Donnini Macciò - 2011 - History of European Ideas 37 (1):63-75.
    In 1911 Gerald F. Shove, later to become a leading Cambridge economist, submitted to King's College a fellowship dissertation on the application of G.E. Moore's ethical philosophy to political theory. In the article the dissertation, hitherto unpublished, is discussed with reference to both the acceptance and elaboration of Moore's Principia Ethica by the members of the Apostles and Bloomsbury groups and Shove's intellectual and personal biography. The thesis tackles some major concepts in political theory like the nature (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4.  49
    Crises of Derrida: Theodicy, Sacrifice and (Post-)Deconstruction.Gerald Moore - 2012 - Derrida Today 5 (2):264-282.
    The last few years have seen the emergence of a more political, ‘post-Derridean’ generation, critical of the impotent messianism of the politics of deconstruction. As Žižek would have it: ‘Derrida's notion of ‘deconstruction as ethics’ seems to rely on a utopian hope which sustains the spectre of ‘infinite justice’, forever postponed, always to come’ (Žižek 2008: 225). The promise of redemption, it follows, would reside in an insubstantial promissory value, in the writing of irredeemable cheques that, if cashed in, could (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. Daniel Heller-Roazen, The Inner Touch: Archaeology of a Sensation.Gerald Moore - 2009 - Radical Philosophy 153:59.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6. Dimensions Space, Shape & Scale in Architecture.Charles Willard Moore & Gerald Allen - 1976
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7.  4
    Ian James, The Fragmentary Demand: An Introduction to the Philosophy of Jean-Luc Nancy.Gerald Moore - 2005 - Oxford Literary Review 27 (1):181-185.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8. Stiegler and Technics.Gerald Moore, Christopher Johnson, Michael Lewis, Ian James, Serge Trottein & Patrick Crogan - 2013 - Edinburgh University Press.
    Bernard Stielger has recently emerged as one of the most significant and original thinkers in the new generation of French philosophers following Derrida and Deleuze.Drawing on art, anthropology, economics, cultural studies, psychoanalysis, politics and sociology, the essays in this collection, by a range of world-class specialists, are united around Stiegler's key concept of technics, which, he argues, constitutes what it is to be human.Stiegler is revealed as a thinker at the forefront of our contemporary concerns with consumerism, technology, inter-generational division, (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9.  6
    The Forgiveness of Sins: A Ritual History.Gerald Moore - 2000 - The Australasian Catholic Record 77 (1):10.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10.  25
    The Christian Bain de Diane, or the Stakes of an Ambiguous Paratext.Patrick Amstutz & Gerald Moore - 2005 - Diacritics 35 (1):136-146.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11.  1
    Gerhard Sonnert. Ivory Bridges: Connecting Science and Society. With the Assistance of Gerald Holton. 227 Pp., Apps., Notes, Refs., Index. Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press, 2002. $30. [REVIEW]Kelly Moore - 2003 - Isis 94 (4):790-791.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12.  17
    Book Review Section 1. [REVIEW]Nicholas Appleton, Loren R. Bonneau, Walter Feinberg, Thomas D. Moore, Albert Grande, W. Eugene Hedley, D. Malcolm Leith, Charles R. Schindler, Leonard Fels, Harry Wagschal, Gregg Jackson, David C. Williams, Gary H. Gilliland, Colin Greer, Gerald L. Gutek, H. Warren Button & Ronald K. Goodenow - 1974 - Educational Studies 5 (1-2):39-52.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13. Determinism, Free Will, and Moral Responsibility.Gerald B. Dworkin (ed.) - 1970 - Prentice-Hall.
    Of liberty and necessity, by D. Hume.--The doctrine of necessity examined, by C. S. Peirce.--Determinism in history, by E. Nagel.--Some arguments for free will, by T. Reid.--Has the self free will? by C. A. Campbell.--Dialogue on free will, by L. de Valla.--Can the will be caused? by C. Ginet.--Free will, by G. E. Moore.--A modal muddle, by S. N. Thomas.--Determinism, indeterminism, and libertarianism, by C. D. Broad.--An empirical disproof of determinism? by K. Lehrer.--Free will, praise and blame, by J. (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  14.  8
    Lost in Translation: The English Language and the Catholic Mass [Book Review].Gerard Moore - 2018 - The Australasian Catholic Record 95 (4):503.
    Moore, Gerard Review of: Lost in translation: The English language and the catholic mass, by Gerald O'Collins, with John Wilkins, pp. 122, paperback, $29.95.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15. G.E. Moore: Selected Writings.G. E. Moore - 1993 - Routledge.
    G.E. Moore, more than either Bertrand Russell or Ludwig Wittgenstein, was chiefly responsible for the rise of the analytic method in twentieth-century philosophy. This selection of his writings shows Moore at his very best. The classic essays are crucial to major philosophical debates that still resonate today. Amongst those included are: * A Defense of Common Sense * Certainty * Sense-Data * External and Internal Relations * Hume's Theory Explained * Is Existence a Predicate? * Proof of an (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   24 citations  
  16.  78
    Moore’s Truths About Causation and Responsibility: A Reply to Alexander and Ferzan. [REVIEW]Michael S. Moore - 2012 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 6 (3):445-462.
    In this response to the review of Moore, Causation and Responsibility, by Larry Alexander and Kimberly Ferzan, previously published in this journal, two issues are discussed. The first is whether causation, counterfactual dependence, moral blame, and culpability, are all scalar properties or relations, that is, matters of more-or-less rather than either-or. The second issue discussed is whether deontological moral obligation is best described as a prohibition against using another as a means, or rather, as a prohibition on an agent (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  17.  76
    Property, Rights, and Freedom*: GERALD F. GAUS.Gerald F. Gaus - 1994 - Social Philosophy and Policy 11 (2):209-240.
    William Perm summarized the Magna Carta thus: “First, It asserts Englishmen to be free; that's Liberty. Secondly, they that have free-holds, that's Property.” Since at least the seventeenth century, liberals have not only understood liberty and property to be fundamental, but to be somehow intimately related or interwoven. Here, however, consensus ends; liberals present an array of competing accounts of the relation between liberty and property. Many, for instance, defend an essentially instrumental view, typically seeing private property as justified because (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  18. Coercion, Ownership, and the Redistributive State: Justificatory Liberalism's Classical Tilt: Gerald Gaus.Gerald Gaus - 2010 - Social Philosophy and Policy 27 (1):233-275.
    Justificatory liberalism is liberal in an abstract and foundational sense: it respects each as free and equal, and so insists that coercive laws must be justified to all members of the public. In this essay I consider how this fundamental liberal principle relates to disputes within the liberal tradition on “the extent of the state.” It is widely thought today that this core liberal principle of respect requires that the state regulates the distribution of resources or well-being to conform to (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   17 citations  
  19.  44
    Jurisprudence as Practical Philosophy: Gerald J. Postema.Gerald J. Postema - 1998 - Legal Theory 4 (3):329-357.
    Nowhere has H.L.A. Hart's influence on philosophical jurisprudence in the English-speaking world been greater than in the way its fundamental project and method are conceived by its practitioners. Disagreements abound, of course. Philosophers debate the extent to which jurisprudence can or should proceed without appeal to moral or other values. They disagree about which participant perspective—that of the judge, lawyer, citizen, or “bad man”—is primary and about what taking up the participant perspective commits the theorist to. However, virtually unchallenged is (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  20. A Discussion Between Wittgenstein and Moore on Certainty : From the Notes of Norman Malcolm.Ludwig Wittgenstein, G. E. Moore, Norman Malcolm & Gabriel Citron - 2015 - Mind 124 (493):73-84.
    In April 1939, G. E. Moore read a paper to the Cambridge University Moral Science Club entitled ‘Certainty’. In it, amongst other things, Moore made the claims that: the phrase ‘it is certain’ could be used with sense-experience-statements, such as ‘I have a pain’, to make statements such as ‘It is certain that I have a pain’; and that sense-experience-statements can be said to be certain in the same sense as some material-thing-statements can be — namely in the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  21.  20
    Public Practical Reason: An Archeology*: GERALD J. POSTEMA.Gerald J. Postema - 1995 - Social Philosophy and Policy 12 (1):43-86.
    Kant argues that the “discipline” of reason holds us to public argument and reflective thought. When we speak the language of reasoned judgment, Kant maintains, we “speak with a universal voice,” expecting and claiming the assent of all other rational beings. This language carries with it a discipline requiring us to submit our judgments to the forum of our rational peers. Remarkably, Kant does not restrict this thought to the realm of politics, but rather treats politics as the model for (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  22. Causation and Responsibility*: MICHAEL S. MOORE.Michael S. Moore - 1999 - Social Philosophy and Policy 16 (2):1-51.
    In various areas of Anglo-American law, legal liability turns on causation. In torts and contracts, we are each liable only for those harms we have caused by the actions that breach our legal duties. Such doctrines explicitly make causation an element of liability. In criminal law, sometimes the causal element for liability is equally explicit, as when a statute makes punishable any act that has “ caused … abuse to the child….” More often, the causal element in criminal liability is (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   21 citations  
  23.  27
    I—A. W. Moore.A. W. Moore - 2003 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 77 (1):169-193.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  24. Choice, Character, and Excuse*: MICHAEL S. MOORE.Michael S. Moore - 1990 - Social Philosophy and Policy 7 (2):29-58.
    Freud justified his extensive theorizing about dreams by the observation that they were “the royal road” to something much more general: namely, our unconscious mental life. The current preoccupation with the theory of excuse in criminal law scholarship can be given a similar justification, for the excuses are the royal road to theories of responsibility generally. The thought is that if we understand why we excuse in certain situations but not others, we will have also gained a much more general (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   17 citations  
  25. What is Deontology?, Part Two: Reasons to Act Gerald F. Gaus.Gerald Gaus - unknown
    Part One of this essay considered familiar ways of characterizing deontology, which focus on the notions of the good and the right. Here we will take up alternative approaches, which stress the type of reasons for actions that are generated by deontological theories. Although some of these alternative conceptualizations of deontology also employ a distinction between the good and the right, all mark the basic contrast between deontology and teleology in terms of reasons to act.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  26.  62
    Why All Welfare States Are Unreasonable*: GERALD F. GAUS.Gerald F. Gaus - 1998 - Social Philosophy and Policy 15 (2):1-33.
    Liberal political theory is all too familiar with the divide between classical and welfare-state liberals. Classical liberals, as we all know, insist on the importance of small government, negative liberty, and private property. Welfare-state liberals, on the other hand, although they too stress civil rights, tend to be sympathetic to “positive liberty,” are for a much more expansive government, and are often ambivalent about private property. Although I do not go so far as to entirely deny the usefulness of this (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  27.  95
    Bentham's Equality-Sensitive Utilitarianism: Gerald J. Postema.Gerald J. Postema - 1998 - Utilitas 10 (2):144-158.
    Rosen argues that Bentham's utilitarian doctrine was sensitive to distributive concerns and would not countenance sacrifice of fundamental individual interests for aggregate gains in happiness in society. This essay seeks to extend and deepen Rosen's argument. It is argued that Bentham's equality-sensitive principle of utility is an expression of an individualist conception of human happiness which contrasts sharply with the orthodox utilitarian abstract conception. Evidence for this interpretation of the basic motivation of Bentham's doctrine is drawn from his view of (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  28.  76
    Bentham on the Public Character of Law: Gerald J. Postema.Gerald J. Postema - 1989 - Utilitas 1 (1):41-61.
    Bentham belongs to a long tradition of reflection on law according to which the nature of law can best be understood in terms of its distinctive contribution to the solution of certain deep and pervasive problems of collective action or collective rationality. I propose to take a critical look at Bentham's unique and penetrating contribution to this tradition. For this purpose I will rely on the interpretation of the main lines of Bentham's jurisprudence and its philosophical motivations which I have (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  29. Utility and Humanity: The Quest for the Honestum in Cicero, Hutcheson, and Hume: James Moore.James Moore - 2002 - Utilitas 14 (3):365-386.
    Hume considered An Enquiry Concerning the Principles of Morals incomparably the best of all his writings. In the argument advanced here, I propose that Hume's preference for the Enquiry may be linked to his admiration of Cicero, and his work, De Officiis. Cicero's attempt to discover the honestum of morality in De Officiis had a particular relevance and appeal for philosophers of the early eighteenth century who were seeking to establish what they called the foundation of morality. One of those (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  30.  46
    What Are These Familiar Words Doing Here?: A. W. Moore.A. W. Moore - 2002 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 51:147-171.
    My title is a quotation from Davidson's essay ‘On Saying That’. And although my concerns are at some remove from his, they do connect at one significant point. We find ourselves under the continual pressure of theory to deny that ordinary familiar semantic features of ordinary familiar words equip them to serve certain ordinary familiar functions. One of Davidson's aims is to resist that pressure as far as the function of reporting indirect speech is concerned. In similar vein I want (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  31. Moore's Paradox and the Accessibility of Justification.Declan Smithies - 2012 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 85 (2):273-300.
    This paper argues that justification is accessible in the sense that one has justification to believe a proposition if and only if one has higher-order justification to believe that one has justification to believe that proposition. I argue that the accessibility of justification is required for explaining what is wrong with believing Moorean conjunctions of the form, ‘p and I do not have justification to believe that p.’.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   47 citations  
  32.  73
    Moore’s Paradox and the Priority of Belief Thesis.John N. Williams - 2013 - Philosophical Studies 165 (3):1117-1138.
    Moore’s paradox is the fact that assertions or beliefs such asBangkok is the capital of Thailand but I do not believe that Bangkok is the capital of Thailand or Bangkok is the capital of Thailand but I believe that Bangkok is not the capital of Thailand are ‘absurd’ yet possibly true. The current orthodoxy is that an explanation of the absurdity should first start with belief, on the assumption that once the absurdity in belief has been explained then this (...)
    Direct download (13 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  33. The Remembered Present: A Biological Theory of Consciousness.Gerald M. Edelman - 1989 - Basic Books.
    Having laid the groundwork in his critically acclaimed books Neural Darwinism (Basic Books, 1987) and Topobiology (Basic Books, 1988), Nobel laureate Gerald M. Edelman now proposes a comprehensive theory of consciousness in The Remembered ...
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   245 citations  
  34.  87
    Gerald Holton, Review of Einstein and Religion: Physics and Theology by Max Jammer. [REVIEW]Gerald Holton - 2000 - Philosophy of Science 67 (3):530-533.
  35. Moore's Paradox in Thought: A Critical Survey.John N. Williams - 2015 - Philosophy Compass 10 (1):24-37.
    It is raining but you don’t believe that it is raining. Imagine silently accepting this claim. Then you believe both that it is raining and that you don’t believe that it is raining. This would be an ‘absurd’ thing to believe,yet what you believe might be true. Itmight be raining, while at the same time, you are completely ignorant of the state of the weather. But how can it be absurd of you to believe something about yourself that might be (...)
    Direct download (12 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  36. Moore's Paradoxes, Evans's Principle and Self-Knowledge.John N. Williams - 2004 - Analysis 64 (4):348-353.
    I supply an argument for Evans's principle that whatever justifies me in believing that p also justifies me in believing that I believe that p. I show how this principle helps explain how I come to know my own beliefs in a way that normally makes me the best authority on them. Then I show how the principle helps to solve Moore's paradoxes.
    Direct download (15 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   25 citations  
  37.  53
    The Order of Public Reason: A Theory of Freedom and Morality in a Diverse and Bounded World.Gerald Gaus - 2010 - Cambridge University Press.
    In this innovative and important work, Gerald Gaus advances a revised and more realistic account of public reason liberalism, showing how, in the midst of fundamental disagreement about values and moral beliefs, we can achieve a moral and political order that treats all as free and equal moral persons. The first part of this work analyzes social morality as a system of authoritative moral rules. Drawing on an earlier generation of moral philosophers such as Kurt Baier and Peter Strawson (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   87 citations  
  38. Henry Moore on Sculpture a Collection of the Sculptor's Writings and Spoken Words.Henry Moore & Philip Brutton James - 1992
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  39. Moore’s Paradox in Belief and Desire.John N. Williams - 2014 - Acta Analytica 29 (1):1-23.
    Is there a Moore ’s paradox in desire? I give a normative explanation of the epistemic irrationality, and hence absurdity, of Moorean belief that builds on Green and Williams’ normative account of absurdity. This explains why Moorean beliefs are normally irrational and thus absurd, while some Moorean beliefs are absurd without being irrational. Then I defend constructing a Moorean desire as the syntactic counterpart of a Moorean belief and distinguish it from a ‘Frankfurt’ conjunction of desires. Next I discuss (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  40.  31
    Veritas: The Correspondence Theory and its Critics.Gerald Vision - 2009 - Bradford.
    In Veritas, Gerald Vision defends the correspondence theory of truth -- the theory that truth has a direct relationship to reality -- against recent attacks, and critically examines its most influential alternatives. The correspondence theory, if successful, explains one way in which we are cognitively connected to the world; thus, it is claimed, truth -- while relevant to semantics, epistemology, and other studies -- also has significant metaphysical consequences. Although the correspondence theory is widely held today, Vision points to (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  41.  63
    Moore’s Paradox in Speech: A Critical Survey.John N. Williams - 2015 - Philosophy Compass 10 (1):10-23.
    It is raining but you don’t believe that it is raining. Imagine accepting this claim. Then you are committed to saying ‘It is raining but I don’t believe that it is raining’. This would be an ‘absurd’ thing to claim or assert, yet what you say might be true. It might be raining, while at the same time, you are completely ignorant of the state of the weather. But how can it be absurd of you to assert something about yourself (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  42.  51
    John Stuart Mill and Royal India: Robin J. Moore.Robin J. Moore - 1991 - Utilitas 3 (1):85-106.
    Though John Stuart Mill's long employment by the East India Company did not limit him to drafting despatches on relations with the princely states, that activity must form the centrepiece of any satisfactory study of his Indian career. As yet the activity has scarcely been glimpsed. It produced, on average, about a draft a week, which he listed in his own hand. He subsequently struck out items that he sought to disown in consequence of substantial revisions made by the Company's (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  43.  56
    Perceptual Recognition as a Function of Meaningfulness of Stimulus Material.Gerald M. Reicher - 1969 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 81 (2):275.
  44.  38
    On Saying and Showing: A. W. Moore.A. W. Moore - 1987 - Philosophy 62 (242):473-497.
    There is not, and may there never be, any treatise by me …onthese things, for the subject is not communicable in words, as othersciences are. Rather is it that, after long association in the business itself and a shared life, a light is lit in the soul, kindled, as it were, by a leaping flame, and thenceforward feeds itself.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  45. Bright Air, Brilliant Fire: On the Matter of the Mind.Gerald M. Edelman - 1992 - Penguin Books.
  46. Moore’s Paradox and Self-Knowledge.Sydney Shoemaker - 1995 - Philosophical Studies 77 (2-3):211-28.
  47.  60
    In Defense of Anarchism by Robert Paul Wolff. [REVIEW]Gerald Dworkin - 1971 - Journal of Philosophy 68 (18):561-567.
  48.  78
    Moore’s Paradox, Introspection and Doxastic Logic.Adam Rieger - 2015 - Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 4 (4):215-227.
    An analysis of Moore's paradox is given in doxastic logic. Logics arising from formalizations of various introspective principles are compared; one logic, K5c, emerges as privileged in the sense that it is the weakest to avoid Moorean belief. Moreover it has other attractive properties, one of which is that it can be justified solely in terms of avoiding false belief. Introspection is therefore revealed as less relevant to the Moorean problem than first appears.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  49. Moore's Margin Notes on Reid.G. E. Moore - unknown
  50.  13
    Absolute Timing of Mental Activities.Gerald S. Wasserman & King-Leung Kong - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (2):243-255.
1 — 50 / 1000