Results for 'Charles Côté-Bouchard'

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  1. Gérard Deledalle, "Charles S. Peirce, Phénoménologue Et Sémioticien". [REVIEW]Guy Bouchard - 1989 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 25 (1):61.
    If Peirce was a "backwoodsman" of semiotic, Deledalle is a pioneer in presenting Peirce to francophone readers. His new book aims at introducing them to a global reading of Peirce's thought according to three periods:nominalistic (1851-70), logico-mathematical and methodological (1870-87), and metaphysical (1887-1914). Given Peirce's writing output, to synthesize, systematize and periodize his works would have been a colossal endeavor. However, Deledalle limited himself to the "Collected Papers" and to an already existing periodization. But the decision not to take into (...)
     
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  2.  25
    Art and Human Emotions. Par Egon Weiner. Springfield, Charles C. Thomas, 1975. 90 P.Guy Bouchard - 1977 - Dialogue 16 (4):754-755.
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  3.  6
    Community and Abbot in the Rule of St. Benedict. Adalbert de Vogüé, Charles Philippi, Ethel Rae Perkins.Constance Bouchard - 1989 - Speculum 64 (2):510-511.
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  4. La Nouvelle Rhétorique Introduction À l'Œvre de Charles Perelman.Guy Bouchard - 1980 - Université Laval, Institut Supérieur des Sciences Humaines.
    Une première partie décrit la théorie générale de l'argumentation en délimitant les cadres de celle-ci (accent sur les divers types d'auditoire, depuis la délibération intime jusqu'à l'auditoire universel), en examinant son point de départ (choix et présentation des prémisses) et en faisant l'inventaire des techniques argumentatives (types d'arguments, étude de l'ensemble du discours). La seconde partie applique la théorie générale de l'argumentation à l'analyse du discours philosophique pour finalement relever comment Perelman tente de donner un nouveau souffle à la philosophie (...)
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  5. From Groups to Individuals: Evolution and Emerging Individuality.Frédéric Bouchard & Philippe Huneman (eds.) - 2013 - MIT Press.
    Our intuitive assumption that only organisms are the real individuals in the natural world is at odds with developments in cell biology, ecology, genetics, evolutionary biology, and other fields. Although organisms have served for centuries as nature’s paradigmatic individuals, science suggests that organisms are only one of the many ways in which the natural world could be organized. When living beings work together—as in ant colonies, beehives, and bacteria-metazoan symbiosis—new collective individuals can emerge. In this book, leading scholars consider the (...)
     
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  6.  49
    Littérature et histoire du christianisme ancien.Timothy Pettipiece, Tuomas Rasimus, Charles Mercure, Dominique Côté, Michael Kaler, Marie-Pierre Bussières, Delphine Bayona, Jean-Thomas Nicole, Paul-Hubert Poirier & Louis Painchaud - 2001 - Laval Théologique et Philosophique 57 (2):337-365.
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  7.  44
    Littérature et histoire du christianisme ancien.Tuomas Rasimus, C. Kazadi, Claude Bégin, Timothy Janz, Dominique Côté, Paul-Hubert Poirier, Timothy Pettipiece, Robert Hurley, Annick Thibault, Anne Pasquier, Louis Painchaud, Charles Mercure, Marie-Pierre Bussières & Andrius Valevicius - 2001 - Laval Théologique et Philosophique 57 (1):121-182.
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  8.  27
    Littérature et histoire du christianisme ancien.Eric Crégheur, Steve Bélanger, Serge Cazelais, Dominique Côté, Lucian Dîncã, Steve Johnston, Michael Kaler, Jean Labrecque, Charles Mercure, Louis Painchaud, Timothy Pettipiece, Paul-Hubert Poirier & Jennifer Wees - 2003 - Laval Théologique et Philosophique 59 (3):541-582.
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    Littérature et histoire du christianisme ancien.Jennifer K. Wees, Charles Mercure, Serge Cazelais, Marie-Pierre Bussières, Eric Crégheur, Timothy Pettipiece, Michael Kaler, Paul-Hubert Poirier, Louis Painchaud & Dominique Côté - 2001 - Laval Théologique et Philosophique 57 (3):563-604.
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  10. Aristotle on Well-Being and Intellectual Contemplation: David Charles.David Charles - 1999 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 73 (1):205–223.
    [David Charles] Aristotle, it appears, sometimes identifies well-being with one activity, sometimes with several, including ethical virtue. I argue that this appearance is misleading. In the Nicomachean Ethics, intellectual contemplation is the central case of human well-being, but is not identical with it. Ethically virtuous activity is included in human well-being because it is an analogue of intellectual contemplation. This structure allows Aristotle to hold that while ethically virtuous activity is valuable in its own right, the best life available (...)
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  11.  42
    Aristotle On Well-Being And Intellectual Contemplation: David Charles.David Charles - 1999 - Supplement to the Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 73 (1):205-223.
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  12.  28
    I–David Charles.David Charles - 1999 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 73 (1):205-223.
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  13. Session of the Charles S. Peirce Society.S. Charles - forthcoming - Semiotics.
     
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  14.  24
    Travels and Studies in the Nearer East. By A. T. Olmstead, B. B. Charles, and J. E. Wrench. Vol. I., Part II., Hittite Inscriptions. [Cornell Expedition to Asia Minor, Etc., Organised by J. R. S. Sterrett.] Ithaca, N.Y., 1911. [REVIEW]H. H., A. T. Olmstead, B. B. Charles & J. E. Wrench - 1912 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 32:195-196.
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  15.  7
    Harry Frankfurt peut-il sauver le blâme doxastique? Possibilités alternatives épistémiques et involontarisme doxastique.Charles Côté-Bouchard - 2012 - Ithaque 10:137-157.
    Peut-on être blâmé pour ses croyances? Bien qu’il s’agisse d’une pratique courante et en apparence légitime, le blâme doxastique entre en conflit avec deux thèses intuitivement plausibles. D’un côté, il semble que nous puissions seulement être blâmés pour ce qui est sous notre contrôle volontaire. Mais de l’autre, il est largement admis que la croyance est un état fondamentalement passif et involontaire. Il s’ensuit que nous ne pouvons jamais être blâmés pour nos croyances. Le présent article examine la réponse que (...)
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  16. Two Types of Epistemic Instrumentalism.Charles Côté-Bouchard - forthcoming - Synthese:1-21.
    Epistemic instrumentalism (EI) views epistemic norms and epistemic normativity as essentially involving the instrumental relation between means and ends. It construes notions like epistemic normativity, norms, and rationality, as forms of instrumental or means-end normativity, norms, and rationality. I do two main things in this paper. In part 1, I argue that there is an under-appreciated distinction between two independent types of epistemic instrumentalism. These are instrumentalism about epistemic norms (norm-EI) and instrumentalism about epistemic normativity (source-EI). In part 2, I (...)
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  17. Can the Aim of Belief Ground Epistemic Normativity?Charles Côté-Bouchard - 2016 - Philosophical Studies 173 (12):3181-3198.
    For many epistemologists and normativity theorists, epistemic norms necessarily entail normative reasons. Why or in virtue of what do epistemic norms have this necessary normative authority? According to what I call epistemic constitutivism, it is ultimately because belief constitutively aims at truth. In this paper, I examine various versions of the aim of belief thesis and argue that none of them can plausibly ground the normative authority of epistemic norms. I conclude that epistemic constitutivism is not a promising strategy for (...)
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  18. Epistemic Instrumentalism and the Too Few Reasons Objection.Charles Côté-Bouchard - 2015 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 23 (3):337-355.
    According to epistemic instrumentalism, epistemic normativity arises from and depends on facts about our ends. On that view, a consideration C is an epistemic reason for a subject S to Φ only if Φ-ing would promote an end that S has. However, according to the Too Few Epistemic Reasons objection, this cannot be correct since there are cases in which, intuitively, C is an epistemic reason for S to Φ even though Φ-ing would not promote any of S’s ends. After (...)
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  19. Is Epistemic Normativity Value-Based?Charles Côté-Bouchard - 2017 - Dialogue 56 (3):407-430.
    What is the source of epistemic normativity? In virtue of what do epistemic norms have categorical normative authority? According to epistemic teleologism, epistemic normativity comes from value. Epistemic norms have categorical authority because conforming to them is necessarily good in some relevant sense. In this article, I argue that epistemic teleologism should be rejected. The problem, I argue, is that there is no relevant sense in which it is always good to believe in accordance with epistemic norms, including in cases (...)
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  20.  76
    Belief's Own Metaethics? A Case Against Epistemic Normativity.Charles Cote-Bouchard - 2017 - Dissertation, King's College London
    Epistemology is widely seen as a normative discipline like ethics. Just like moral facts, epistemic facts – i.e. facts about our beliefs’ epistemic justification, rationality, reasonableness, correctness, warrant, and the like – are standardly viewed as normative facts. Yet, whereas many philosophers have rejected the existence of moral facts, few have raised similar doubts about the existence of epistemic facts. In recent years however, several metaethicists and epistemologists have rejected this Janus-faced or dual stance towards the existence of moral and (...)
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  21.  19
    Epistemological Closed Questions: A Reply to Greco.Charles Côte-Bouchard - 2017 - Manuscrito 40 (4):97-111.
    ABSTRACT According to G.E. Moore’s ‘Open Question’ argument, moral facts cannot be reduced or analyzed in non-normative natural terms. Does the OQA apply equally in the epistemic domain? Does Moore’s argument have the same force against reductionist accounts of epistemic facts and concepts? In a recent article, Daniel Greco has argued that it does. According to Greco, an epistemological version of the OQA is just as promising as its moral cousin, because the relevant questions in epistemology are just as ‘open’ (...)
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  22.  94
    ‘Ought’ Implies ‘Can’ Against Epistemic Deontologism: Beyond Doxastic Involuntarism.Charles Côté-Bouchard - 2019 - Synthese 196 (4):1641-1656.
    According to epistemic deontologism, attributions of epistemic justification are deontic claims about what we ought to believe. One of the most prominent objections to this conception, due mainly to William P. Alston, is that the principle that ‘ought’ implies ‘can’ rules out deontologism because our beliefs are not under our voluntary control. In this paper, I offer a partial defense of Alston’s critique of deontologism. While Alston is right that OIC rules out epistemic deontologism, appealing to doxastic involuntarism is not (...)
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  23.  56
    Knowledge, Reasons, and Errors About Error Theory.Charles Cote-Bouchard & Clayton Littlejohn - forthcoming - In Robin McKenna & Christos Kyriacou (eds.), Metaepistemology: Realism & Antirealism. Palgrave Macmillan.
    According to moral error theorists, moral claims necessarily represent categorically or robustly normative facts. But since there are no such facts, moral thought and discourse are systematically mistaken. One widely discussed objection to the moral error theory is that it cannot be true because it leads to an epistemic error theory. We argue that this objection is mistaken. Objectors may be right that the epistemic error theory is untenable. We also agree with epistemic realists that our epistemological claims are not (...)
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  24.  23
    Terence CUNEO, The Normative Web: An Argument for Moral Realism.Charles Côté-Bouchard - 2010 - Ithaque 7:131-135.
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  25.  13
    Epistemic Deontologism and the Voluntarist Strategy Against Doxastic Involuntarism.Charles Côté-Bouchard - 2011 - Ithaque 8:1-16.
    According to the deontological conception of epistemic justification, a belief is justified when it is our obligation or duty as rational creatures to believe it. However, this view faces an important objection according to which we cannot have such epistemic obligations since our beliefs are never under our voluntary control. One possible strategy against this argument is to show that we do have voluntary control over some of our beliefs, and that we therefore have epistemic obligations. This is what I (...)
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  26.  2
    Sosa, E. , Knowing Full Well.Charles Côté-Bouchard - 2011 - Ithaque 9:159-163.
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  27.  12
    Buruli Ulcer in Southern Côte D’Ivoire: Dynamic Schemes of Perception and Interpretation of Modes of Transmission.Daniele O. Konan, Lydia Mosi, Gilbert Fokou, Christelle Dassi, Charles A. Narh, Charles Quaye, Jasmina Saric, Noël N. Abe & Bassirou Bonfoh - 2019 - Journal of Biosocial Science 51 (4):520-533.
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  28.  9
    "Strong of Body, Brave and Noble": Chivalry and Society in Medieval France.Constance Brittain Bouchard.Charles T. Wood - 2000 - Speculum 75 (2):443-445.
  29. Côté’s ‘Siger and the Skeptic'.Charles Bolyard - 2011 - In Gyula Klima & Alexander W. Hall (eds.), Medieval Skepticism, and the Claim to Metaphysical Knowledge. Cambridge Scholars Publishing. pp. 27-31.
  30. His Glassy Essence: An Autobiography of Charles Sanders Peirce.Kenneth Laine Ketner - 1998 - Vanderbilt University Press.
    Charles Sanders Peirce , the most important and influential of the classical American philosophers, is credited as the inventor of the philosophical school of pragmatism. The scope and significance of his work have had a lasting effect not only in several fields of philosophy but also in mathematics, the history and philosophy of science, and the theory of signs, as well as in literary and cultural studies. Largely obscure until after his death, Peirce's life has long been a subject (...)
     
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  31.  83
    On Charles Taylor's 'Deep Diversity'.Charles Blattberg - forthcoming - In Ursula Lehmkuhl & Elisabeth Tutschek (eds.), 150 Years of Canada: Grappling with Diversity Since 1867. Münster, Germany: Waxmann Verlag GmbH.
    Charles Taylor’s idea of “deep diversity” has played a major role in the debates around multiculturalism in Canada and around the world. Originally, the idea was meant to account for how the different national communities within Canada – those of the English-speaking Canadians, the French-speaking Quebeckers, and the Aboriginals – conceive of their belonging to the country in different ways. But Taylor conceives of these differences strictly in terms of irreducibility; that is, he fails to see that they also (...)
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  32.  17
    Une généalogie de l’imperfection : la situation de l’homme au physique et au moral selon Charles Secrétan.Daniel Schulthess - 2015 - In Nicole Hatem (ed.), Charles Secrétan philosophe de la liberté. Beyrouth: Publications l’Université Saint-Joseph-Faculté des lettres et sciences humaines. pp. 63-74.
    The article focuses on the Philosophy of Freedom of the Swiss philosopher Charles Secrétan (1815-1895) and on the attempt to reconcile freedom as the fundamental experience for the human being with the alleged necessitarianism that would result from the positive sciences. The notion of “fall” as it is found in the Christian tradition allows Secrétan to rediscover an original dimension from which we can conceive the laws of nature as contingent. It is space and time that impose their constraints (...)
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  33.  49
    Modern Social Imaginaries Charles Taylor Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2004, 215 Pp., $18.95 Paper. [REVIEW]Charles Blattberg - 2006 - Dialogue 45 (1):183.
    Review of Charles Taylor's book, Modern Social Imaginaries.
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  34. Charles Sanders Peirce Complete Published Works, Including Selected Secondary Materials : Microfiche Collection.Charles S. Peirce & Kenneth Laine Ketner - 1977 - Johnson Associates.
     
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  35.  47
    Charles S. Peirce's Evolutionary Philosophy.Carl R. Hausman - 1993 - Cambridge University Press.
    In this systematic introduction to the philosophy of Charles S. Peirce, the author focuses on four of Peirce's fundamental conceptions: pragmatism and Peirce's development of it into what he called 'pragmaticism'; his theory of signs; his phenomenology; and his theory that continuity is of prime importance for philosophy. He argues that at the centre of Peirce's philosophical project is a unique form of metaphysical realism, whereby continuity and evolutionary change are both necessary for our understanding of experience. In his (...)
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  36. Charles Taylor and Paul Ricoeur on Self-Interpretations and Narrative Identity.Arto Laitinen - 2002 - In Rauno Huttunen, Hannu Heikkinen & Leena Syrjälä (eds.), Narrative Research. Voices of Teachers and Philosophers. SoPhi. pp. 57-71.
    In this chapter I discuss Charles Taylor's and Paul Ricoeur's theories of narrative identity and narratives as a central form of self-interpretation. Both Taylor and Ricoeur think that self-identity is a matter of culturally and socially mediated self-definitions, which are practically relevant for one's orientation in life. First, I will go through various characterisations that Ricoeur gives of his theory, and try to show to what extent they also apply to Taylor's theory. Then, I will analyse more closely (...) Taylor's, and in section three, Paul Ricoeur's views on narrative identity. (shrink)
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  37.  49
    Charles Taylor.Ruth Abbey (ed.) - 2000 - Routledge.
    Charles Taylor is one of the most influential and prolific philosophers in the English-speaking world today. The breadth of his writings is unique, ranging from reflections on artificial intelligence to analyses of contemporary multicultural societies. This thought-provoking introduction to Taylor's work outlines his ideas in a coherent and accessible way without reducing their richness and depth. His contribution to many of the enduring debates within Western philosophy is examined and the arguments of his critics assessed. Taylor's reflections on the (...)
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  38.  35
    Charles Sanders Peirce: A Life.Joseph Brent - 1993 - History and Philosophy of Logic 14 (2):531-538.
    Charles Sanders Peirce was born in September 1839 and died five months before the guns of August 1914. He is perhaps the most important mind the United States has ever produced. He made significant contributions throughout his life as a mathematician, astronomer, chemist, geodesist, surveyor, cartographer, metrologist, engineer, and inventor. He was a psychologist, a philologist, a lexicographer, a historian of science, a lifelong student of medicine, and, above all, a philosopher, whose special fields were logic and semiotics. He (...)
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  39. A Critique of Charles Taylor's Notions of “Moral Sources” and “Constitutive Goods”.Arto Laitinen - 2004 - In Jussi Kotkavirta & Michael Quante (eds.), Moral Realism. Acta Philosophica Fennica. pp. 73-104.
    In this paper I argue that moral realism does not, pace Charles Taylor, need “moral sources” or “constitutive goods”, and adding these concepts distorts the basic insights of what can be called “cultural” moral realism.1 Yet the ideas of “moral topography” or “moral space” as well as the idea of “ontological background pictures” are valid, if separated from those notions. What does Taylor mean by these notions?
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  40. Charles Taylor and Nicholas H. Smith on Human Constants and Transcendental Arguments. A Review. [REVIEW]Arto Laitinen - 2003 - SATS 4 (2):191-201.
    In the introduction to his Philosophical Papers 1&2 Charles Taylor assures us that his work, while encompassing a range of issues, follows a single, tightly knit agenda. He claims that the central questions concern "philosophical anthropology". Taylor's work on these questions has been presented piecemeal, in the form of articles and papers, and the student has had to imagine what a systematic monograph by Taylor on philosophical anthropology would look like. Neither Hegel, Sources of the Self, Ethics of Authenticity, (...)
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  41. Today and Tomorrow: Review of Charles Taylor by Ruth Abbey. [REVIEW]Arto Laitinen - 2001 - Radical Philosophy 30:108.
    The Philosophy Now series promises to combine rigorous analysis with authoritative expositions. Ruth Abbey’s book lives up to this demand by being a clear, reliable and more than up-to-date introduction to Charles Taylor ’s philosophy. Although it is an introductory book, the amount of footnotes and references ought to please those who want to study the original texts more closely. Abbey’s book is structured thematically: morality, selfhood, politics and epistemology get 50 pages each. The focus is on the internal (...)
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  42. Who's Afraid of Charles Sanders Peirce? Knocking Some Critical Common Sense Into Moral Philosophy.Cornelis de Waal - 2012 - In Cornelis De Waal & Krysztof Piotr Skowronski (eds.), The Normative Thought of Charles S. Peirce. Fordham University Press. pp. 83-100.
    In this essay I explore the potential contribution of Peirce's theory of scientific inquiry to moral philosophy. After a brief introduction, I outline Peirce's theory of inquiry. Next, I address why Peirce believed that this theory of inquiry is inapplicable to what he called "matters of vital importance," the latter including genuine moral problems. This leaves us in the end with two options: We can try to develop an alternative way of addressing moral problems or we can seek to reconcile (...)
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  43.  38
    Charles Peirce's Pragmatic Pluralism.Sandra B. Rosenthal - 1994 - State University of New York Press.
    This work runs counter to the traditional interpretations of Peirce's philosophy by eliciting an inherent strand of pragmatic pluralism that is embedded in the very core of his thought and that weaves his various doctrines into a systematic ...
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  44.  68
    Idealism, Pragmatism, and the Will to Believe: Charles Renouvier and William James.Jeremy Dunham - 2015 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 23 (4):1-23.
    This article investigates the history of the relation between idealism and pragmatism by examining the importance of the French idealist Charles Renouvier for the development of William James's ‘Will to Believe’. By focusing on French idealism, we obtain a broader understanding of the kinds of idealism on offer in the nineteenth century. First, I show that Renouvier's unique methodological idealism led to distinctively pragmatist doctrines and that his theory of certitude and its connection to freedom is worthy of reconsideration. (...)
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  45. Tu Wei-Ming and Charles Taylor on Embodied Moral Reasoning.Andrew T. W. Hung - 2013 - Philosophy, Culture, and Traditions 3:199-216.
    This paper compares the idea of embodied reasoning by Confucian Tu Wei-Ming and Canadian philosopher Charles Taylor. They have similar concerns about the problems of secular modernity, that is, the domination of instrumental reason and disembodied rationality. Both of them suggest that we have to explore a kind of embodied moral reasoning. I show that their theories of embodiment have many similarities: the body is an instrument for our moral knowledge and self-understanding; such knowledge is inevitably a kind of (...)
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  46. The Spanish Mathematician Ventura Reyes Prósper and His Connections with Charles S. Peirce and Christine Ladd-Franklin.Jaime Nubiola - 2000 - Arisbe. The Peirce Gateway.
    In this paper the relations between the almost unknown Spanish mathematician Ventura Reyes Prósper (1863-1922) with Charles S. Peirce and Christine Ladd-Franklin are described. Two brief papers from Reyes Prósper published in El Progreso Matemático 12 (20 December 1891), pp. 297-300, and 18 (15 June 1892) pp. 170-173 on Ladd-Franklin, and on Peirce and Mitchell, respectively, are translated for first time into English and included at the end of the paper.
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  47.  29
    Charles S. Peirce’s Philosophy of Signs: Essays in Comparative Semiotics.Gerard Deledalle - 2000 - Indiana University Press.
    [Note: Picture of Peirce available] Charles S. Peirce’s Philosophy of Signs Essays in Comparative Semiotics Gérard Deledalle Peirce’s semiotics and metaphysics compared to the thought of other leading philosophers. "This is essential reading for anyone who wants to find common ground between the best of American semiotics and better-known European theories. Deledalle has done more than anyone else to introduce Peirce to European audiences, and now he sends Peirce home with some new flare."—Nathan Houser, Director, Peirce Edition Project (...) S. Peirce’s Philosophy of Signs examines Peirce’s philosophy and semiotic thought from a European perspective, comparing the American’s unique views with a wide variety of work by thinkers from the ancients to moderns. Parts I and II deal with the philosophical paradigms which are at the root of Peirce’s new theory of signs, pragmatic and social. The main concepts analyzed are those of "sign" and "semiosis" and their respective trichotomies; formally in the case of "sign," in time in the case of semiosis. Part III is devoted to comparing Peirce’s theory of semiotics as a form of logic to the work of other philosophers, including Bertrand Russell, Wittgenstein, Frege, Philodemus, Lady Welby, Saussure, Morris, Jakobson, and Marshall McLuhan. Part IV compares Peirce’s "scientific metaphysics" with European metaphysics. Gérard Deledalle holds the Doctorate in Philosophy from the Sorbonne. A research scholar at Columbia University and Attaché at the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Paris, he has also been Professor of Philosophy and Head of the Philosophy Department of the universities of Tunis, Perpignan, and Libreville. In 1990 he received the Herbert W. Schneider Award "for distinguished contributions to the understanding and development of American philosophy. In 2001, he was appointed vice-president of the Charles S. Peirce Society. Contents Introduction—Peirce Compared: Directions for Use Part I—Semeiotic as Philosophy Peirce’s New Philosophical Paradigms Peirce’s Philosophy of Semeiotic Peirce’s First Pragmatic Papers The Postscriptum of 1893 Part II—Semeiotic as Semiotics Sign: Semiosis and Representamen—Semiosis and Time Sign: The Concept and Its Use—Reading as Translation Part III—Comparative Semiotics Semiotics and Logic: A Reply to Jerzy Pelc Semeiotic and Greek Logic: Peirce and Philodemus Semeiotic and Significs: Peirce and Lady Welby Semeiotic and Semiology: Peirce and Saussure Semeiotic and Semiotics: Peirce and Morris Semeiotic and Linguistics: Peirce and Jakobson Semeiotic and Communication: Peirce and McLuhan Semeiotic and Epistemology: Peirce, Frege, and Wittgenstein Part IV—Comparative Metaphysics Gnoseology—Perceiving and Knowing: Peirce, Wittgenstein, and Gestalttheorie Ontology—Transcendentals "of" or "without" Being: Peirce versus Aristotle and Thomas Aquinas Cosmology—Chaos and Chance within Order and Continuity: Peirce between Plato and Darwin Theology—The Reality of God: Peirce’s Triune God and the Church’s Trinity Conclusion—Peirce: A Lateral View. (shrink)
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  48.  33
    Strong Evaluation Without Moral Sources. On Charles Taylor’s Philosophical Anthropology and Ethics.Arto Laitinen - 2008 - De Gruyter.
    Charles Taylor is one of the leading living philosophers. In this book Arto Laitinen studies and develops further Taylor's philosophical views on human agency, personhood, selfhood and identity. He defends Taylor's view that our ethical understandings of values play a central role. The book also develops and defends Taylor's form of value realism as a view on the nature of ethical values, or values in general. The book criticizes Taylor's view that God, Nature or Human Reason are possible constitutive (...)
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  49. La recepción de Charles S. Peirce en Tucumán.Jaime Nubiola - 2016 - In Antología cultural 1916-2016,. Tucumán, Argentina: Archivo Histórico de la Provincia de Tucumán. pp. 261-266.
    A brief history of the reception of Charles S. Peirce in the city of Tucuman in the North of Argentina is described with some detail: 1) Courses and lectures; 2) Publications.
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  50. Charles Peirce and Scholastic Realism.John F. Boler - 1963 - Seattle, University of Washington Press.
    IN 1903, commenting on an article he had written more than thirty years before, Charles Peirce said that he had changed his mind on many issues at least a half-dozen times but had "never been able to think differently on that question of nominalism and realism" (1.20). For anyone acquainted with Peirce's writings, this remark alone could justify a study of "that question.".
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