Results for 'James A. Schirillo'

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  1.  17
    Timing: A Missing Key Ingredient in Typical fMRI Studies of Emotion.Christian E. Waugh & James A. Schirillo - 2012 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (3):170-171.
    Lindquist et al. provide a compelling summary of the brain bases of the onset of emotion. Their conclusions, however, are constrained by typical fMRI techniques that do not assess a key ingredient in emotional experience – timing. We discuss the importance of timing in theories of emotion as well as the implications of neural temporal dynamics for psychological constructionism.
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  2.  12
    Hemispheric Laterality Measured in Rembrandt's Portraits Using Pupil Diameter and Aesthetic Verbal Judgements.W. Ryan Powell & James A. Schirillo - 2011 - Cognition and Emotion 25 (5):868-885.
  3.  28
    When Dominance and Sex Are Both Right.James A. Schirillo & Melissa Fox - 2005 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (4):612-613.
    We have found that the left side of faces displayed in Rembrandt's portraits capture how humans rank male dominance, helping to coordinate avoidance behaviors among asymmetric individuals. Moreover, the left side of faces may also coordinate approach responses, like attractiveness, in human females. Therefore, adding sexual selection to dominance paints a more realistic picture of what the contralateral right hemisphere is doing.
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  4.  49
    Color Memory Penetrates Early Vision.James A. Schirillo - 1999 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (3):393-393.
    Pylyshyn's concentration on form perception to demonstrate that early vision is cognitively impenetrable neglects that color perception is also part of early vision. Thus, the finding of Duncker (1939), Bruner et al. (1951), and Delk and Fillenbaum (1965) that the expected color of objects affects how they are perceived challenges Pylyshyn's thesis.
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  5.  29
    Self-Control: Acts of Free Will.James A. Schirillo - 1995 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (1):141-141.
    Rachlin overlooks that free will determines when and in what direction acts that appear impulsive will occur. Because behavioral patterns continuously evolve, animals are not guaranteed when they will, or how to, maximize larger-later reinforcements. An animal therefore uses self-control to emit free acts to vary behavioral patterns to optimize larger-later rewards.
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  6.  17
    Spatial Phenomenology Requires Potential Illumination.James A. Schirillo - 2003 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (4):425-426.
    Collapsing three-dimensional space into two violates Lehar's “volumetric mapping” constraint and can cause the visual system to construct illusory transparent regions to replace voxels that would have contained illumination. This may underlie why color constancy is worse in two dimensions, and argues for Lehar to revise his phenomenal spatial model by putting “potential illumination” in empty space.
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  7.  43
    The Sensorimotor Contingency of Multisensory Localization Correlates with the Conscious Percept of Spatial Unity.Gwendolyn E. Roberson, Mark T. Wallace & James A. Schirillo - 2001 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (5):1001-1002.
    Two cross-modal experiments provide partial support for O'Regan & Noë's (O&N's) claim that sensorimotor contingencies mediate perception. Differences in locating a target sound accompanied by a spatially disparate neutral light correlate with whether the two stimuli were perceived as spatially unified. This correlation suggests that internal representations are necessary for conscious perception, which may also mediate sensorimotor contingencies.
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  8.  33
    Biological Neuroscience is Only as Radical as the Evolution of Mind.Terry Blumenthal & James Schirillo - 1999 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (5):831-831.
    A biological neuroscientific theory must acknowledge that the function of a neurological system is to produce behaviors that promote survival. Thus, unlike what Gold & Stoljar claim, function and behavior are the province of neurobiology and cannot be relegated to the field of psychological phenomena, which would then trivialize the radical doctrine if accepted. One possible advantage of adopting such a (correctly revised) radical doctrine is that it might ultimately produce a successful, evolutionarily based, theory of mind.
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  9.  21
    The Voluntariness of Virtue – and Belief: James A. Montmarquet.James A. Montmarquet - 2008 - Philosophy 83 (3):373-390.
    This paper examines the relative voluntariness of three types of virtue: ‘epistemic’ virtues like open-mindedness; ‘motivational’ virtues like courage, and more robustly ‘moral’ virtues like justice. A somewhat novel conception of the voluntariness of belief is offered in terms of the limited, but quite real, voluntariness of certain epistemic virtues.
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  10.  44
    Editing Hume's Treatise: James A. Harris.James A. Harris - 2008 - Modern Intellectual History 5 (3):633-641.
    In 1975 the Clarendon Press at Oxford published Peter Nidditch's edition of John Locke's An Essay concerning Human Understanding. In his Introduction Nidditch says that his edition “offers a text that is directly derived, without modernization, from the early published versions; it notes the provenance of all its adopted readings ; and it aims at recording all relevant differences between these versions”. As Nidditch goes on to acknowledge, the “relevant differences” were many, “requiring several thousand registrations both in the case (...)
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  11. The Writings of William James: A Comprehensive Edition.William James - 1967 - New York: University of Chicago Press.
  12.  39
    Core Affect and the Psychological Construction of Emotion.James A. Russell - 2003 - Psychological Review 110 (1):145-172.
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  13. Truth as a Pretense.James A. Woodbridge - 2005 - In Mark Eli Kalderon (ed.), Fictionalism in Metaphysics. Oxford University Press. pp. 134.
    Truth-talk exhibits certain features that render it philosophically suspect and motivate a deflationary account. I offer a new formulation of deflationism that explains truth-talk in terms of semantic pretense. This amounts to a fictionalist account of truth-talk but avoids an error-theoretic interpretation and its resulting incoherence. The pretense analysis fits especially well with deflationism’s central commitment, and it handles truth-talk’s unusual features effectively. In particular, this approach suggests an interesting strategy for dealing with the Liar paradox. This version of deflationism (...)
     
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  14.  16
    Knowledge in Transit.James A. Secord - 2004 - Isis 95 (4):654-672.
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  15. The Self We Live By: Narrative Identity in a Postmodern World.James A. Holstein & Jaber F. Gubrium - 1999 - Oup Usa.
    The Self We Live By confronts the serious challenges facing the self in postmodern times. Taking issue with contemporary trivializations of the self, the book traces a course of development from the early pragmatists who formulated what they called the 'empirical self', to contemporary constructionist views of the storied self. Presenting an institutional context for the increasing complexity and ubiquity of narrative identity, the authors illustrate the 'everyday technology of self construction' and idscuss the resulting moral climate. The book is (...)
     
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  16.  11
    Victorian Sensation: The Extraordinary Publication, Reception, and Secret Authorship of "Vestiges of the Natural History of Creation".James A. Secord & John M. Lynch - 2001 - Journal of the History of Biology 34 (3):565-579.
  17.  44
    Emotion, Core Affect, and Psychological Construction.James A. Russell - 2009 - Cognition and Emotion 23 (7):1259-1283.
  18.  11
    Mixed Emotions Viewed From the Psychological Constructionist Perspective.James A. Russell - 2017 - Emotion Review 9 (2):111-117.
    Feeling bad is one thing, judging something to be bad another. This hot/cold distinction helps resolve the debate between bipolar and bivariate accounts of affect. A typical affective reaction includes both core affect and judgments of the affective qualities of various aspects of the stimulus situation. Core affect is described by a bipolar valence dimension in which feeling good precludes simultaneously feeling bad and vice versa. Judgments of affective quality of opposite valence can occur simultaneously because the stimulus situation has (...)
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  19.  47
    Everyday Moral Issues Experienced by Managers.James A. Waters, Frederick Bird & Peter D. Chant - 1986 - Journal of Business Ethics 5 (5):373 - 384.
    Based on the results of open ended interviews with managers in a variety of organizational positions, moral questions encountered in everyday managerial life are described. These involve transactions with employees, peers and superiors, customers, suppliers and other stakeholders. It is suggested that managers identify transactions as involving personal moral concern when they believe that a moral standard has a bearing on the situation and when they experience themselves as having the power to affect the transaction. This is the first in (...)
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  20.  89
    The Moral Dimension of Organizational Culture.James A. Waters & Frederick Bird - 1987 - Journal of Business Ethics 6 (1):15 - 22.
    The lack of concrete guidance provided by managerial moral standards and the ambiguity of the expectations they create are discussed in terms of the moral stress experienced by many managers. It is argued that requisite clarity and feelings of obligation with respect to moral standards derive ultimately from public discussion of moral issues within organizations and from shared public agreement about appropriate behavior. Suggestions are made about ways in which the moral dimension of an organization's culture can be more effectively (...)
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  21. Assessing Freeman’s Stakeholder Theory.James A. Stieb - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 87 (3):401 - 414.
    At least since the publication of the monumental Strategic Management: A Stakeholder Approach (1984), the “stakeholder theory” originated by R. E. Freeman has engrossed much of the business ethics literature. Subsequently, some advocates have moved a bit too quickly and without proper definition or argument. They have exceeded Freeman’s intentions which are more libertarian and free-market than is often thought. This essay focuses on the versions of stakeholder theory directly authored or coauthored by Freeman in an effort to recover (1) (...)
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  22. The Writings of William James: A Comprehensive Edition, Including an Annotated Bibliography Updated Through 1977.William James - 1977 - University of Chicago Press.
    In his introduction to this collection, John representative. McDermott presents James's thinking in all its manifestations, stressing the importance of radical empiricism and placing into perspective the doctrines of pragmatism and the will to believe. The critical periods of James's life are highlighted to illuminate the development of his philosophical and psychological thought. The anthology features representive selections from The Principles of Psychology, The Will to Believe , and The Variety of Religious Experience in addition to the complete (...)
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  23.  51
    A Critique of Positive Responsibility in Computing.James A. Stieb - 2008 - Science and Engineering Ethics 14 (2):219-233.
    It has been claimed that (1) computer professionals should be held responsible for an undisclosed list of “undesirable events” associated with their work and (2) most if not all computer disasters can be avoided by truly understanding responsibility. Programmers, software developers, and other computer professionals should be defended against such vague, counterproductive, and impossible ideals because these imply the mandatory satisfaction of social needs and the equation of ethics with a kind of altruism. The concept of social needs is debatable (...)
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  24.  9
    The Discovery of a Vocation: Darwin’s Early Geology.James A. Secord - 1991 - British Journal for the History of Science 24 (2):133-157.
    When HMS Beagle made its first landfall in January 1832, the twenty-two-year-old Charles Darwin set about taking detailed notes on geology. He was soon planning a volume on the geological structure of the places visited, and letters to his sisters confirm that he identified himself as a ‘geologist’. For a young gentleman of his class and income, this was a remarkable thing to do. Darwin's conversion to evolution by selection has been examined so intensively that it is easy to forget (...)
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  25. Epistemic Virtue and Doxastic Responsibility.James A. Montmarquet - 1993 - Rowman & Littlefield.
    A detailed account of certain traits of intellectual character—the epistemic virtues—and of their relation to the responsibility for one's beliefs.
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  26.  16
    Distinctive Features, Categorical Perception, and Probability Learning: Some Applications of a Neural Model.James A. Anderson, Jack W. Silverstein, Stephen A. Ritz & Randall S. Jones - 1977 - Psychological Review 84 (5):413-451.
  27.  11
    Emergent Ghosts of the Emotion Machine.James A. Coan - 2010 - Emotion Review 2 (3):274-285.
    Competing perspectives on the nature of emotion are illustrated with latent and emergent variable models. Latent variable models draw from classical test theory, assuming that the measured indicators of emotion covary by virtue of some common executive, organizing neural circuit or network in the brain. By contrast, emergent variable models draw from a theory-driven, operational definition tradition, positing that emotions do not cause, but rather are caused by, the measured indicators of emotion, assuming no executive neural circuit or network, and (...)
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  28. Semantic Pathology and the Open Pair. [REVIEW]James A. Woodbridge & Bradley Armour-Garb - 2005 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 71 (3):695–703.
    In Vagueness and Contradiction (2001), Roy Sorensen defends and extends his epistemic account of vagueness. In the process, he appeals to connections between vagueness and semantic paradox. These appeals come mainly in Chapter 11, where Sorensen offers a solution to what he calls the no-no paradox—a “neglected cousin” of the more famous liar—and attempts to use this solution as a precedent for an epistemic account of the sorites paradox. This strategy is problematic for Sorensen’s project, however, since, as we establish, (...)
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  29.  7
    Assessing Freeman’s Stakeholder Theory.James A. Stieb - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 87 (3):401-414.
    At least since the publication of the monumental Strategic Management: A Stakeholder Approach, the "stakeholder theory" originated by R. E. Freeman has engrossed much of the business ethics literature. Subsequently, some advocates have moved a bit too quickly and without proper definition or argument. They have exceeded Freeman's intentions which are more libertarian and free-market than is often thought. This essay focuses on the versions of stakeholder theory directly authored or coauthored by Freeman in an effort to recover Freeman's intentions (...)
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  30.  32
    Edinburgh Lamarckians: Robert Jameson and Robert E. Grant.James A. Secord - 1991 - Journal of the History of Biology 24 (1):1 - 18.
  31.  20
    Evaluating Ethics Consultation: Framing the Questions.James A. Tulsky & Ellen Fox - 1996 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 7 (2):109.
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  32. Emotion in Human Consciousness is Built on Core Affect.James A. Russell - 2005 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 12 (8-10):26-42.
    This article explores the idea that Core Affect provides the emotional quality to any conscious state. Core Affect is the neurophysiological state always accessible as simply feeling good or bad, energized or enervated, even if it is not always the focus of attention. Core Affect, alone or more typically combined with other psychological processes, is found in the experiences of feeling, mood and emotion, including the subjective experiences of fear, anger and other so-called basic emotions which are commonly thought to (...)
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  33.  37
    Nature’s Fancy: Charles Darwin and the Breeding of Pigeons.James A. Secord - 1981 - Isis 72 (2):163-186.
  34.  60
    The Shadow of Macintyre's Manager in the Kingdom of Conscience Constrained.James A. H. S. Hine - 2007 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 16 (4):358–371.
    This article addresses the issue of moral compunction among a sample of senior managers set against the background of their routine organizational participation. In considering what factors influence their moral sensibilities these managers were interviewed using an approach designed to elicit their perceptions concerning both the ethical and commercially imperative dimensions of their working lives. The qualitative data resulting from this inquiry, while tentative, indicates the primacy of the normative appeal of shareholder value, conditioned by the exigencies of engagement in (...)
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  35.  16
    The Geological Survey of Great Britain as a Research School, 1839–1855.James A. Secord - 1986 - History of Science 24 (3):223-275.
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  36.  20
    Influences on Student Intention and Behavior Toward Environmental Sustainability.James A. Swaim, Michael J. Maloni, Stuart A. Napshin & Amy B. Henley - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 124 (3):1-20.
    As organizations place greater emphasis on environmental objectives, business educators must produce the next set of leaders who can champion corporate environmental sustainability initiatives. However, environmental sustainability represents a polarizing topic with some students dismissing its importance and legitimacy. Limited research exists to understand student behavioral influences on sustainability education, especially as it translates to environmental sustainability behavior in the workplace. This gap challenges our ability as educators to understand how to best teach environmental sustainability in order to reach diverse (...)
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  37.  75
    Understanding Engineering Professionalism: A Reflection on the Rights of Engineers.James A. Stieb - 2011 - Science and Engineering Ethics 17 (1):149-169.
    Engineering societies such as the National Society of Professional Engineers (NSPE) and associated entities have defined engineering and professionalism in such a way as to require the benefit of humanity (NSPE 2009a, Engineering Education Resource Document. NSPE Position Statements. Governmental Relations). This requirement has been an unnecessary and unfortunate add-on. The trend of the profession to favor the idea of requiring the benefit of humanity for professionalism violates an engineer’s rights. It applies political pressure that dissuades from inquiry, approaches to (...)
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  38. Classification of the Sciences in Medieval Thought.James A. Weisheipl - 1965 - Mediaeval Studies 27 (1):54-90.
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  39.  14
    Comments on Articles by Frijda and by Conway and Bekerian.James A. Russell - 1987 - Cognition and Emotion 1 (2):193-197.
  40.  37
    Biomechanical and Phenomenological Models of the Body, the Meaning of Illness and Quality of Care.James A. Marcum - 2004 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 7 (3):311-320.
    The predominant model of the body in modern western medicine is the machine. Practitioners of the biomechanical model reduce the patient to separate, individual body parts in order to diagnose and treat disease. Utilization of this model has led, in part, to a quality of care crisis in medicine, in which patients perceive physicians as not sufficiently compassionate or empathic towards their suffering. Alternative models of the body, such as the phenomenological model, have been proposed to address this crisis. According (...)
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  41. Of Liberty and Necessity: The Free Will Debate in Eighteenth-Century British Philosophy.James A. Harris - 2005 - Oxford University Press.
    The eighteenth century was a time of brilliant philosophical innovation in Britain. In Of Liberty and Necessity James A. Harris presents the first comprehensive account of the period's discussion of what remains a central problem of philosophy, the question of the freedom of the will. He offers new interpretations of contributions to the free will debate made by canonical figures such as Locke, Hume, Edwards, and Reid, and also discusses in detail the arguments of some less familiar writers. Harris (...)
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  42.  9
    Newton in the Nursery: Tom Telescope and the Philosophy of Tops and Balls, 1761–1838.James A. Secord - 1985 - History of Science 23 (2):127-151.
  43.  63
    Recent Consideration of World Government in the IR Literature: A Critical Appraisal.James A. Yunker - 2011 - World Futures 67 (6):409 - 436.
    Because recent contributions on world government in the international relations (IR) literature have focused on relatively nebulous issues, they are of limited usefulness for illuminating whether or not an actual world government would advance the human prospect. This question cannot be sensibly addressed unless in the light of a specific institutional proposal. Along the authority-effectiveness continuum separating the relatively ineffectual existent United Nations on the one hand, and the traditional world federalist ideal of the omnipotent world state on the other, (...)
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  44.  4
    Relativity in the Perception of Emotion in Facial Expressions.James A. Russell & Beverley Fehr - 1987 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 116 (3):223-237.
  45.  15
    In Defense of a Psychological Constructionist Account of Emotion: Reply to Zachar.James A. Russell - 2008 - Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 28 (2):423-429.
    Comment on an article by Peter Zachar An account of emotion must include categories and dimensions. Categories because humans categorize reality, and a person's categorization of their own state influences aspects of that state. Dimensions because humans are always in some state of Core Affect, which varies by degree along dimensions of valence and activation . In Psychological Construction, Core Affect and a host of other "components" are separate on-going processes, always in some pattern. Occasionally the pattern resembles a prototype (...)
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  46. The Pathology of Validity.James A. Woodbridge & Bradley Armour-Garb - 2008 - Synthese 160 (1):63-74.
    Stephen Read has presented an argument for the inconsistency of the concept of validity. We extend Read's results and show that this inconsistency is but one half of a larger problem. Like the concept of truth, validity is infected with what we call "semantic pathology," a condition that actually gives rise to two symptoms: inconsistency and indeterminacy. After sketching the basic ideas behind semantic pathology and explaining how it manifests both symptoms in the concept of truth, we present cases that (...)
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  47.  9
    Introduction.James A. Secord - 1993 - British Journal for the History of Science 26 (4):387-389.
  48.  19
    Emotions Are Not Modules.James A. Russell - 2008 - In Luc Faucher & Christine Tappolet (eds.), The Modularity of Emotions. University of Calgary Press. pp. 53-71.
  49.  48
    The Dignity of Science; Studies in the Philosophy of Science, Presented to William Humbert Kane. Edited, with Introd. By James A. Weisheipl in Collaboration with the Thomist and the Albertus Magnus Lyceum. Pref. By Michael Browne. [REVIEW]James A. Weisheipl & William Humbert Kane - unknown
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  50.  19
    A Theory for the Recognition of Items From Short Memorized Lists.James A. Anderson - 1973 - Psychological Review 80 (6):417-438.
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