Results for 'Daniel, A. M.'

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  1.  46
    Herculaneum Herculaneum—Past, Present, and Future. By Charles Waldstein, Litt. D., Ph.D., London: Macmillan & Co., 1908. 8vo. LL.D., and Leonard Shoobridge, M.A. Pp. Xxii, 324. 59 Illustrations. 2u.Net. Buried Herculaneum. By Ethel Ross Barker. London: Adam and Charles Black, 1908. 8vo. Xvi, 253. Nine Plans and 64 Plates. 7.1. 6d. [REVIEW]A. M. Daniel - 1909 - The Classical Review 23 (08):267-268.
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  2.  15
    Ethical Concerns with Applied Behavior Analysis for Autism Spectrum "Disorder".Daniel A. Wilkenfeld & Allison M. McCarthy - 2020 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 30 (1):31-69.
    This paper has both theoretical and practical ambitions. The theoretical ambitions are to explore what would constitute both effective and ethical treatment of Autism Spectrum Disorder.1 However, the practical ambition is perhaps more important: we argue that a dominant form of Applied Behavior Analysis, which is widely taken to be far-and-away the best “treatment”2 for ASD, manifests systematic violations of the fundamental tenets of bioethics. Moreover, the supposed benefits of the treatment not only fail to mitigate these violations, but they (...)
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  3.  6
    Damophon.A. M. Daniel - 1904 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 24:41-57.
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  4.  34
    Roman Sculpture Roman Sculpture From Augustus to Constantine, by Mrs. Arthur Strong. Pp. Xx + 410; 130 Plates. London (Duckworth and Co.) and New York (Charles Scribner's Sons). 1907. [REVIEW]A. M. Daniel - 1908 - The Classical Review 22 (03):85-87.
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  5.  14
    Teaching Ethics: The Moral Development of Educators.Daniel A. Stout & Elizabeth M. Tucker - 1999 - Journal of Mass Media Ethics 14 (2):107-118.
    The moral development of advertising educators is important to an understanding of how they teach ethics. This article describes a survey that explores how advertising educators define and think about ethics. It examines the theoretical foundations of moral development in relation to teaching advertising ethics and provides a summary describing advertising educators' ideas about the nature of ethics. We conclude by predicting today's advertising students' ability to identify and resolve ethical dilemmas.
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  6. Hedonism and Welfare Economics: Daniel M. Hausman.Daniel M. Hausman - 2010 - Economics and Philosophy 26 (3):321-344.
    This essay criticizes the proposal recently defended by a number of prominent economists that welfare economics be redirected away from the satisfaction of people's preferences and toward making people happy instead. Although information about happiness may sometimes be of use, the notion of happiness is sufficiently ambiguous and the objections to identifying welfare with happiness are sufficiently serious that welfare economists are better off using preference satisfaction as a measure of welfare. The essay also examines and criticizes the position associated (...)
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  7.  22
    Neighborhood Disadvantage and Adolescent Stress Reactivity.Daniel A. Hackman, Laura M. Betancourt, Nancy L. Brodsky, Hallam Hurt & Martha J. Farah - 2012 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.
  8.  6
    Measurement of Iron Self-Diffusion in Hematite Single Crystals by Secondary Ion-Mass Spectrometry and Comparison with Cation Self-Diffusion in Corundum-Structure Oxides.A. C. S. Sabioni, A. M. Huntz, A. M. J. M. Daniel & W. A. A. Macedo - 2005 - Philosophical Magazine 85 (31):3643-3658.
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  9. Preference Satisfaction and Welfare Economics: Daniel M. Hausman and Michael S. McPherson.Daniel M. Hausman - 2009 - Economics and Philosophy 25 (1):1-25.
    The tenuous claims of cost-benefit analysis to guide policy so as to promote welfare turn on measuring welfare by preference satisfaction and taking willingness-to-pay to indicate preferences. Yet it is obvious that people's preferences are not always self-interested and that false beliefs may lead people to prefer what is worse for them even when people are self-interested. So welfare is not preference satisfaction, and hence it appears that cost-benefit analysis and welfare economics in general rely on a mistaken theory of (...)
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  10.  65
    Happiness, the Self and Human Flourishing: Daniel M. Haybron.Daniel M. Haybron - 2008 - Utilitas 20 (1):21-49.
    The psychological condition of happiness is normally considered a paradigm subjective good, and is closely associated with subjectivist accounts of well-being. This article argues that the value of happiness is best accounted for by a non-subjectivist approach to welfare: a eudaimonistic account that grounds well-being in the fulfillment of our natures, specifically in self-fulfillment. And self-fulfillment consists partly in authentic happiness. A major reason for this is that happiness, conceived in terms of emotional state, bears a special relationship to the (...)
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  11.  54
    End-of-Life Decision-Making in Canada: The Report by the Royal Society of Canada Expert Panel on End-of-Life Decision-Making.Udo Schüklenk, Johannes J. M. van Delden, Jocelyn Downie, Sheila A. M. Mclean, Ross Upshur & Daniel Weinstock - 2011 - Bioethics 25 (s1):1-73.
    ABSTRACTThis report on end‐of‐life decision‐making in Canada was produced by an international expert panel and commissioned by the Royal Society of Canada. It consists of five chapters.Chapter 1 reviews what is known about end‐of‐life care and opinions about assisted dying in Canada.Chapter 2 reviews the legal status quo in Canada with regard to various forms of assisted death.Chapter 3 reviews ethical issues pertaining to assisted death. The analysis is grounded in core values central to Canada's constitutional order.Chapter 4 reviews the (...)
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  12.  13
    Understanding for Hire.Daniel A. Wilkenfeld & Christa M. Johnson - 2019 - Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 50 (3):389-405.
    In this paper, we will explore one way in which understanding can—and, we will argue, should—be valuable. We will do this by drawing on what has been said about the different ways knowledge can be valuable. Our main contribution will be to identify one heretofore undiscussed way knowledge could be valuable, but isn’t—specifically, having value to someone other than the understander. We suggest that it is a desideratum on an account of understanding that understanding have the specified type of value; (...)
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  13.  54
    Deterrence and the Just Distribution of Harm*: DANIEL M. FARRELL.Daniel M. Farrell - 1995 - Social Philosophy and Policy 12 (2):220-240.
    It is extraordinary, when one thinks about it, how little attention has been paid by theorists of the nature and justification of punishment to the idea that punishment is essentially a matter of self-defense. H. L. A. Hart, for example, in his famous “Prolegomenon to the Principles of Punishment,” is clearly committed to the view that, at bottom, there are just three directions in which a plausible theory of punishment can go: we can try to justify punishment on purely consequentialist (...)
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  14.  26
    Frege’s Attack on “Abstraction” and His Defense of the “Applicability” of Arithmetic.Daniël F. M. Strauss - 2003 - South African Journal of Philosophy 22 (1):63-80.
    The traditional understanding of abstraction operates on the basis of the assumption that only entities are subject to thought processes in which particulars are disregarded and commonalities are lifted out (the so-called method of genus proximum and differentia specifica). On this basis Frege criticized the notion of abstraction and convincingly argued that (this kind of) “entitary- directed” abstraction can never provide us with any numbers. However, Frege did not consider the alternative of “property- abstraction.” In this article an argument for (...)
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  15. The Illusion of Conscious Will.Daniel M. Wegner - 2002 - MIT Press.
    In this book Daniel Wegner offers a novel understanding of the relation of consciousness, the will, and our intentional and voluntary actions. Wegner claims that our experience and common sense view according to which we can influence our behavior roughly the way we experience that we do it is an illusion.
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  16.  35
    The Scope and Limitations of Von Bertalanffy’s Systems Theory.Daniël F. M. Strauss - 2002 - South African Journal of Philosophy 21 (3):163-179.
    The Systems Theory is a complex theory (yet it is not identical to recent theories of complexity). The intention of this qualification is to demonstrate that the concept of a system is a complex basic concept of scientific thinking. This means that it is defined in terms of various elementary basic concepts brought together in its explication. The definition given by Von Bertalanffy to the concept of a system employs conceptual elements coming from at least five prominent conceptual clusters. In (...)
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  17.  17
    The Neurochemistry and Social Flow of Singing: Bonding and Oxytocin.Jason R. Keeler, Edward A. Roth, Brittany L. Neuser, John M. Spitsbergen, Daniel J. M. Waters & John-Mary Vianney - 2015 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
  18.  15
    A Future Life as Represented by the Greek Tragedians.Maud M. Daniel - 1890 - The Classical Review 4 (03):81-95.
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  19.  7
    Strong Genetic Overlap Between Executive Functions and Intelligence.Laura E. Engelhardt, Frank D. Mann, Daniel A. Briley, Jessica A. Church, K. Paige Harden & Elliot M. Tucker-Drob - 2016 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 145 (9):1141-1159.
  20.  39
    The Inexact and Separate Science of Economics.Daniel M. Hausman - 1992 - Cambridge University Press.
    This book offers a comprehensive overview of the structure, strategy and methods of assessment of orthodox theoretical economics. In Part I Professor Hausman explains how economists theorise, emphasising the essential underlying commitment of economists to a vision of economics as a separate science. In Part II he defends the view that the basic axioms of economics are 'inexact' since they deal only with the 'major' causes; unlike most writers on economic methodology, the author argues that it is the rules that (...)
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  21.  17
    Implicit Memory for Visual Objects and the Structural Description System.Daniel L. Schacter, Lynn A. Cooper & Suzanne M. Delaney - 1990 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 28 (4):367-372.
  22. Vicarious Agency: Experiencing Control Over the Movements of Others.Daniel M. Wegner & Betsy Sparrow - unknown
    Participants watched themselves in a mirror while another person behind them, hidden from view, extended hands forward on each side where participants’ hands would normally appear. The hands performed a series of movements. When participants could hear instructions previewing each movement, they reported an enhanced feeling of controlling the hands. Hearing instructions for the movements also enhanced skin conductance responses when a rubber band was snapped on the other’s wrist after the movements. Such vicarious agency was not felt when the (...)
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  23. The Mind’s Best Trick: How We Experience Conscious Will.Daniel M. Wegner - 2003 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 7 (2):65-69.
    We often consciously will our own actions. This experience is so profound that it tempts us to believe that our actions are caused by consciousness. It could also be a trick, however – the mind’s way of estimating its own apparent authorship by drawing causal inferences about relationships between thoughts and actions. Cognitive, social, and neuropsychological studies of apparent mental causation suggest that experiences of conscious will frequently depart from actual causal processes and so might not reflect direct perceptions of (...)
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  24.  40
    Causal Asymmetries.Daniel M. Hausman - 1998 - Cambridge University Press.
    This book, by one of the pre-eminent philosophers of science writing today, offers the most comprehensive account available of causal asymmetries. Causation is asymmetrical in many different ways. Causes precede effects; explanations cite causes not effects. Agents use causes to manipulate their effects; they don't use effects to manipulate their causes. Effects of a common cause are correlated; causes of a common effect are not. This book explains why a relationship that is asymmetrical in one of these regards is asymmetrical (...)
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  25.  56
    The Mismeasure of Morals: Antisocial Personality Traits Predict Utilitarian Responses to Moral Dilemmas.Daniel M. Bartels & David A. Pizarro - 2011 - Cognition 121 (1):154-161.
  26.  52
    Making a Necessity of Virtue: Aristotle and Kant on Virtue.Daniel M. Weinstock - 2002 - Mind 111 (443):707-711.
  27.  40
    Much Ado About Eye Movements to Nothing: A Response to Ferreira Et Al.: Taking a New Look at Looking at Nothing.Daniel C. Richardson, Gerry T. M. Altmann, Michael J. Spivey & Merrit A. Hoover - 2009 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 13 (6):235-236.
  28.  11
    The Qurʾān's Self-Image: Writing and Authority in Islam's ScriptureThe Quran's Self-Image: Writing and Authority in Islam's Scripture.Glen M. Cooper & Daniel A. Madigan - 2003 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 123 (1):247.
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  29.  19
    How “Rational” is “Rationality”?Daniël F. M. Strauss - 2003 - South African Journal of Philosophy 22 (3):247-266.
    By taking serious a remark once made by Paul Bernays, namely that an account of the nature of rationality should begin with concept-formation, this article sets out to uncover both the restrictive and the expansive boundaries of rationality. In order to do this some implications of the perennial philosophical problem of the “coherence of irreducibles” will be related to the acknowledgement of primitive terms and of their indefinability. Some critical remarks will be articulated in connection with an over-estimation of rationality (...)
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  30. Modularity and the Causal Markov Condition: A Restatement.Daniel M. Hausman & James Woodward - 2004 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 55 (1):147-161.
    expose some gaps and difficulties in the argument for the causal Markov condition in our essay ‘Independence, Invariance and the Causal Markov Condition’ ([1999]), and we are grateful for the opportunity to reformulate our position. In particular, Cartwright disagrees vigorously with many of the theses we advance about the connection between causation and manipulation. Although we are not persuaded by some of her criticisms, we shall confine ourselves to showing how our central argument can be reconstructed and to casting doubt (...)
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  31. Précis of the Illusion of Conscious Will.Daniel M. Wegner - 2004 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (5):649-659.
    The experience of conscious will is the feeling that we are doing things. This feeling occurs for many things we do, conveying to us again and again the sense that we consciously cause our actions. But the feeling may not be a true reading of what is happening in our minds, brains, and bodies as our actions are produced. The feeling of conscious will can be fooled. This happens in clinical disorders such as alien hand syndrome, dissociative identity disorder, and (...)
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  32. An Analysis of a Learning Paradigm.Daniel Osherson, M. Stob & S. Weinstein - 1986 - In William Demopoulos (ed.), Language Learning and Concept Acquisition. Ablex. pp. 103.
     
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  33.  25
    Solving Belief Problems: Toward a Task Analysis.Daniel Roth & Alan M. Leslie - 1998 - Cognition 66 (1):1-31.
  34. When Jack and Jill Make a Deal*: DANIEL M. HAUSMAN.Daniel M. Hausman - 1992 - Social Philosophy and Policy 9 (1):95-113.
    In ordinary circumstances, human actions have a myriad of unintended and often unforeseen consequences for the lives of other people. Problems of pollution are serious examples, but spillovers and side effects are the rule, not the exception. Who knows what consequences this essay may have? This essay is concerned with the problems of justice created by spillovers. After characterizing such spillovers more precisely and relating the concept to the economist's notion of an externality, I shall then consider the moral conclusions (...)
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  35. Thought Suppression.Daniel M. Wegner - unknown
    Key Words mental control, intrusive thought, rebound effect, ironic processes Abstract Although thought suppression is a popular form of mental control, research has indicated that it can be counterproductive, helping assure the very state of mind one had hoped to avoid. This chapter reviews the research on suppression, which spans a wide range of domains, including emotions, memory, interpersonal processes, psychophysiological reactions, and psychopathology. The chapter considers the relevant methodological and theoretical issues and suggests directions for future research.
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  36.  10
    Implicit Memory for Unfamiliar Objects Depends on Access to Structural Descriptions.Daniel L. Schacter, Lynn A. Cooper & Suzanne M. Delaney - 1990 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 119 (1):5-24.
  37.  67
    Precis of the Illusion of Conscious Will (and Commentaries and Reply).Daniel M. Wegner - 2004 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (5):649-659.
    The experience of conscious will is the feeling that we are doing things. This feeling occurs for many things we do, conveying to us again and again the sense that we consciously cause our actions. But the feeling may not be a true reading of what is happening in our minds, brains, and bodies as our actions are produced. The feeling of conscious will can be fooled. This happens in clinical disorders such as alien hand syndrome, dissociative identity disorder, and (...)
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  38. Chronic Thought Suppression.Daniel M. Wegner & Sophia Zanakos - unknown
    Bear Suppression Inventory (WBSI), was I'ound to correlate with n>casurcs of obsessional thinking and depressive and anxious al'lect, t pridic( signs «I' clinical «hscssion ainong individuals prone (oward «h»c»»i«n >I (hi>>king, (« predict depression tive (h (», and to predict I''iilurc «I' electr«dermal responses to habituate am«ng pci>pic having emotional thoughts. The WBSI was inversely correlated with repression as assessed by the Repression-Sensitization Scale, and so tap» a trait that i» itc unlike rcprc»si«n:is traditi«n;illy c«nccivcd.
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  39. National Center for Biomedical Ontology: Advancing Biomedicine Through Structured Organization of Scientific Knowledge.Daniel L. Rubin, Suzanna E. Lewis, Chris J. Mungall, Misra Sima, Westerfield Monte, Ashburner Michael, Christopher G. Chute, Ida Sim, Harold Solbrig, M. A. Storey, Barry Smith, John D. Richter, Natasha Noy & Mark A. Musen - 2006 - Omics: A Journal of Integrative Biology 10 (2):185-198.
    The National Center for Biomedical Ontology is a consortium that comprises leading informaticians, biologists, clinicians, and ontologists, funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Roadmap, to develop innovative technology and methods that allow scientists to record, manage, and disseminate biomedical information and knowledge in machine-processable form. The goals of the Center are (1) to help unify the divergent and isolated efforts in ontology development by promoting high quality open-source, standards-based tools to create, manage, and use ontologies, (2) to create (...)
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  40.  74
    A Neutral Conception of Reasonableness?Daniel M. Weinstock - 2006 - Episteme 3 (3):234-247.
    Much liberal theorizing of the past twenty years has been built around a conception of neutrality and an accompanying virtue of reasonableness according to which citizens ought to be able to view public policy debates from a perspective detached from their comprehensive conceptions of the good. The view of “justifi catory neutrality” that emerges from this view is discussed and rejected as embodying controversial views about the relationship of individuals to their conceptions of the good. It is shown to be (...)
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  41.  50
    Correlated Strategies as Institutions.Daniel G. M. Arce - 1997 - Theory and Decision 42 (3):271-285.
    Two institutions that are often implicit or overlooked in noncooperative games are the assumption of Nash behavior to solve a game, and the ability to correlate strategies. We consider two behavioral paradoxes; one in which maximin behavior rules out all Nash equilibria (‘Chicken’), and another in which minimax supergame behavior leads to an ‘inefficient’ outcome in comparison to the unique stage game equilibrium (asymmetric ‘Deadlock’). Nash outcomes are achieved in both paradoxes by allowing for correlated strategies, even when individual behavior (...)
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  42.  75
    Principled Moral Sentiment and the Flexibility of Moral Judgment and Decision Making.Daniel M. Bartels - 2008 - Cognition 108 (2):381-417.
    Three studies test eight hypotheses about (1) how judgment differs between people who ascribe greater vs. less moral relevance to choices, (2) how moral judgment is subject to task constraints that shift evaluative focus (to moral rules vs. to consequences), and (3) how differences in the propensity to rely on intuitive reactions affect judgment. In Study 1, judgments were affected by rated agreement with moral rules proscribing harm, whether the dilemma under consideration made moral rules versus consequences of choice salient, (...)
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  43. The Hyperaccessibility of Suppressed Thoughts.Daniel M. Wegner - unknown
    The accessibility of suppressed thoughts was compared with the accessibility of thoughts on which Ss were consciously trying to concentrate. In Experiment I, Ss made associations to word prompts as they tried to suppress thinking about a target word (e.g., house) or tried to concentrate on that word. Under the cognitive load imposed by time pressure, they gave the target word in response to target-related prompts (e.g., home) more often during suppression than during concentration. In Experiment 2, reaction times for (...)
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  44. Happiness: A Very Short Introduction.Daniel M. Haybron - 2013 - Oxford University Press.
    Most of us spend our lives striving for happiness. But what is it? How important is it? How can we (and should we) pursue it? In this Very Short Introduction Dan Haybron provides a comprehensive look at the nature of happiness. By using examples, Haybron considers how we measure happiness, what makes us happy, and considers its subjective nature.
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  45. Transactive Memory in Close Relationships.Daniel M. Wegner - 1991 - Journal of Personality and Social Psychology 61:923--929.
    Memory perfttrmattce of 118 individuals who had been iu close dating relationships for at least 3 months was studied. For a memory task ostensibly to be performed by pairs, some Ss were paired..
     
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  46. Darwin and the Situation of Emotion Research.Daniel M. Gross & Stephanie D. Preston - 2020 - Emotion Review 12 (3):179-190.
    This article demonstrates how researchers from both the sciences and the humanities can learn from Charles Darwin’s mixed methodology. We identify two basic challenges that face emotion research in the sciences, namely a mismatch between experiment design and the complexity of life that we aim to explain, and problematic efforts to bridge the gap, including invalid inferences from constrained study designs, and equivocal use of terms like “sympathy” and “empathy” that poorly reflect such methodological constraints. We argue that Darwin’s mixed (...)
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  47.  77
    Voluntary Involuntariness: Thought Suppression and the Regulation of the Experience of Will.Daniel M. Wegner & James A. K. Erskine - 2003 - Consciousness and Cognition 12 (4):684-694.
    Participants were asked to carry out a series of simple tasks while following mental control instructions. In advance of each task, they either suppressed thoughts of their intention to perform the task, concentrated on such thoughts, or monitored their thoughts without trying to change them. Suppression resulted in reduced reports of intentionality as compared to monitoring, and as compared to concentration. There was a weak trend for suppression to enhance reported intentionality for a repetition of the action carried out after (...)
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  48. Blaming God for Our Pain: Human Suffering and the Divine Mind.M. Wegner Daniel & Gray Kurt - unknown
    Believing in God requires not only a leap of faith but also an extension of people’s normal capacity to perceive the minds of others. Usually, people perceive minds of all kinds by trying to understand their conscious experience (what it is like to be them) and their agency (what they can do). Although humans are perceived to have both agency and experience, humans appear to see God as possessing agency, but not experience. God’s unique mind is due, the authors suggest, (...)
     
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  49. The Economy of Desire: Christianity and Capitalism in a Postmodern World.Daniel M. Bell - 2012 - Baker Academic.
    In this addition to the Church and Postmodern Culture series, theologian Daniel Bell compares and contrasts capitalism and Christianity, showing how Christianity provides resources for faithfully navigating the postmodern global economy.Bell approaches capitalism and Christianity as alternative visions of humanity, God, and the good life. Considering faith and economics in terms of how desire is shaped, he casts the conflic as one between different disciplines desire. He engages the work of two important postmodern philosophers, Deleuze and Foucault, to illuminate the (...)
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  50.  28
    Joint Perception: Gaze and Social Context.Daniel C. Richardson, Chris N. H. Street, Joanne Y. M. Tan, Natasha Z. Kirkham, Merrit A. Hoover & Arezou Ghane Cavanaugh - 2012 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.
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