Results for 'Greg Wong-Taylor'

989 found
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  1.  18
    Do CE mandates impact the number of CE providers and licensing board complaints? A longitudinal look.Steven E. Rothke, Greg J. Neimeyer, Jennifer M. Taylor & Mary F. Zemansky - 2021 - Ethics and Behavior 31 (7):463-474.
    ABSTRACT With few exceptions, the effectiveness of continuing education mandates has been measured by self-report assessments of the professional psychologists who fulfill them. The present investigation provided a longitudinal look at the number of approved CE providers and the incidence of licensing board complaints across a succession of two-year cycles prior to, and following, the 2012 implementation of CE mandates in the State of Illinois. Findings showed a substantial increase in the number of CE providers across that time, though no (...)
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  2.  49
    Beauty and the beholder: the role of visual sensitivity in visual preference.Branka Spehar, Solomon Wong, Sarah van de Klundert, Jessie Lui, Colin W. G. Clifford & Richard P. Taylor - 2015 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
  3.  68
    Increased Functional Connectivity During Emotional Face Processing in Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder.Kristina Safar, Simeon M. Wong, Rachel C. Leung, Benjamin T. Dunkley & Margot J. Taylor - 2018 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 12.
  4.  55
    The Intention Debate in German Criminal Law.Greg Taylor - 2004 - Ratio Juris 17 (3):346-380.
    This article considers the various suggestions that have been put forward by German scholars to replace the traditional concept of intention, which the author has criticized elsewhere (Taylor 2004). The debate on this topic has become a minor academic industry in Germany, and should be better known as the English-speaking world struggles with its own concepts of intention. Despite the great amount of effort and ingenuity devoted to this topic in Germany, however, the author concludes that only one theory (...)
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  5. Collaborative Virtual Worlds and Productive Failure.Michael J. Jacobson, Charlotte Taylor, Anne Newstead, Wai Yat Wong, Deborah Richards, Meredith Taylor, Porte John, Kartiko Iwan, Kapur Manu & Hu Chun - 2011 - In Proceedings of the CSCL (Computer Supported Cognition and Learning) III. University of Hong Kong.
    This paper reports on an ongoing ARC Discovery Project that is conducting design research into learning in collaborative virtual worlds (CVW).The paper will describe three design components of the project: (a) pedagogical design, (b)technical and graphics design, and (c) learning research design. The perspectives of each design team will be discussed and how the three teams worked together to produce the CVW. The development of productive failure learning activities for the CVW will be discussed and there will be an interactive (...)
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  6.  7
    Artists in the Audience: Cults, Camp, and American Film Criticism.Greg Taylor - 2001 - Princeton University Press.
    How have popular American films influenced film criticism and intellectual thinking. This book shows that critics, beginning in the 1940s, turned to the movies as raw material to be moulded into a more radical modernism.
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  7. The Daily Grail.Greg Taylor - unknown
    Today we’re talking with Stuart Hameroff, Professor Emeritus at the Departments of Anesthesiology and Psychology, and Director of the Center for Consciousness Studies, at the University of Arizona. Dr Hameroff is best-known for his research on 'quantum consciousness', an alternative model to the accepted view of how consciousness arises. With Sir Roger Penrose, Dr Hameroff has proposed that consciousness arises at the quantum level within structures inside neurons, known as microtubules.
     
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  8. Two Dogmas of Analytical Philosophy.Greg Taylor - 2007 - Macalester Journal of Philosophy 16 (1):40-55.
    In his landmark article, “Two Dogmas of Empiricism,” W.V.O. Quine pushed analytical philosophy into its post-positivist phase by rejecting two central tenets of logical empiricism. The first dogma was the distinction between analytic and synthetic statements; the second was reductionism, or the belief that to each synthetic sentence there corresponds a set of experiences that will confirm or disconfirm it. But in both “Two Dogmas” and Word and Object, Quine stretches analytical philosophy to its limits. The problem is, ironically, his (...)
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  9.  42
    Two refusals of Royal assent in Victoria.Greg Taylor - unknown
    The Governor of Victoria, having objected to two Bills passed by Parliament in the 1850s, received advice from the colonial government to refuse assent to them. These are the only occasions on which the Royal assent has been refused locally in Victoria, and one of the very few such incidents in Australian history. One of the Bills would have implied a statement that UK law of the day was incompatible with religious liberty, and thus raised sectarian and Imperial complications; the (...)
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  10. Proceedings of the CSCL (Computer Supported Cognition and Learning) III.Michael J. Jacobson, Charlotte Taylor, Anne Newstead, Wai Yat Wong, Deborah Richards, Meredith Taylor, Porte John, Kartiko Iwan, Kapur Manu & Hu Chun - 2011 - University of Hong Kong.
     
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  11.  29
    Continuing Education in Professional Psychology: Do Ethics Mandates Matter?Douglas M. Wear, Jennifer M. Taylor & Greg J. Neimeyer - 2011 - Ethics and Behavior 21 (2):165-172.
    Do continuing education (CE) mandates increase participation in ethics programs and enhance their perceived outcomes? In a study of 5,198 North American psychologists, significant differences were found between mandated and nonmandated psychologists in relation to their participation in ethics programs but not in the perceived outcomes associated with those trainings. Although 64.3% of those psychologists operating under ethics mandates reported completing at least one ethics training within the previous year, only 40.7% of those without such mandates reported doing likewise. Overall, (...)
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  12.  42
    Proceedings of the Eighth Annual Deep Brain Stimulation Think Tank: Advances in Optogenetics, Ethical Issues Affecting DBS Research, Neuromodulatory Approaches for Depression, Adaptive Neurostimulation, and Emerging DBS Technologies.Vinata Vedam-Mai, Karl Deisseroth, James Giordano, Gabriel Lazaro-Munoz, Winston Chiong, Nanthia Suthana, Jean-Philippe Langevin, Jay Gill, Wayne Goodman, Nicole R. Provenza, Casey H. Halpern, Rajat S. Shivacharan, Tricia N. Cunningham, Sameer A. Sheth, Nader Pouratian, Katherine W. Scangos, Helen S. Mayberg, Andreas Horn, Kara A. Johnson, Christopher R. Butson, Ro’ee Gilron, Coralie de Hemptinne, Robert Wilt, Maria Yaroshinsky, Simon Little, Philip Starr, Greg Worrell, Prasad Shirvalkar, Edward Chang, Jens Volkmann, Muthuraman Muthuraman, Sergiu Groppa, Andrea A. Kühn, Luming Li, Matthew Johnson, Kevin J. Otto, Robert Raike, Steve Goetz, Chengyuan Wu, Peter Silburn, Binith Cheeran, Yagna J. Pathak, Mahsa Malekmohammadi, Aysegul Gunduz, Joshua K. Wong, Stephanie Cernera, Aparna Wagle Shukla, Adolfo Ramirez-Zamora, Wissam Deeb, Addie Patterson, Kelly D. Foote & Michael S. Okun - 2021 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 15:644593.
    We estimate that 208,000 deep brain stimulation (DBS) devices have been implanted to address neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders worldwide. DBS Think Tank presenters pooled data and determined that DBS expanded in its scope and has been applied to multiple brain disorders in an effort to modulate neural circuitry. The DBS Think Tank was founded in 2012 providing a space where clinicians, engineers, researchers from industry and academia discuss current and emerging DBS technologies and logistical and ethical issues facing the field. (...)
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  13.  12
    Breaking the Boundaries Collective – A Manifesto for Relationship-based Practice.D. Darley, P. Blundell, L. Cherry, J. O. Wong, A. M. Wilson, S. Vaughan, K. Vandenberghe, B. Taylor, K. Scott, T. Ridgeway, S. Parker, S. Olson, L. Oakley, A. Newman, E. Murray, D. G. Hughes, N. Hasan, J. Harrison, M. Hall, L. Guido-Bayliss, R. Edah, G. Eichsteller, L. Dougan, B. Burke, S. Boucher, A. Maestri-Banks & Members of the Breaking the Boundaries Collective - 2024 - Ethics and Social Welfare 18 (1):94-106.
    This paper argues that professionals who make boundary-related decisions should be guided by relationship-based practice. In our roles as service users and professionals, drawing from our lived experiences of professional relationships, we argue we need to move away from distance-based practice. This includes understanding the boundary stories and narratives that exist for all of us – including the people we support, other professionals, as well as the organisations and systems within which we work. When we are dealing with professional boundary (...)
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  14. Carving a Life from Legacy: Frankfurt’s Account of Free Will and Manipulation in Greg Egan’s “Reasons to Be Cheerful”.Taylor W. Cyr - 2018 - Journal of Science Fiction and Philosophy 1:1-15.
    Many find it intuitive that having been manipulated undermines a person's free will. Some have objected to accounts of free will like Harry Frankfurt's (according to which free will depends only on an agent's psychological structure at the time of action) by arguing that it is possible for manipulated agents, who are intuitively unfree, to satisfy Frankfurt's allegedly sufficient conditions for freedom. Drawing resources from Greg Egan's "Reasons to Be Cheerful" as well as from stories of psychologically sophisticated artificial (...)
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  15. Gadamer's Aspectival Realism.Greg Lynch - 2020 - Ergo: An Open Access Journal of Philosophy 7:985-1014.
    Gadamer claims that human beings are capable of understanding only ‘aspects’ of reality, yet he also holds that, through these aspects, we understand reality itself. In this sense he is an ‘aspectival realist.’ This paper considers two attempts to explain Gadamer’s aspectival realism: the ‘schematization’ reading defended by Charles Taylor, and the ‘holist’ reading of Brice Wachterhauser. I criticize these views on two fronts: that they are at odds with Gadamer’s texts, and that they fail to reconcile aspectivalism and (...)
     
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  16. Relativism: A Contemporary Anthology.Michael Krausz (ed.) - 2010 - Columbia University Press.
    The thirty-three essays in <I>Relativism: A Contemporary Anthology</I> grapple with one of the most intriguing, enduring, and far-reaching philosophical problems of our age. Relativism comes in many varieties. It is often defined as the belief that truth, goodness, or beauty is relative to some context or reference frame, and that no absolute standards can adjudicate between competing reference frames. Michael Krausz's anthology captures the significance and range of relativistic doctrines, rehearsing their virtues and vices and reflecting on a spectrum of (...)
  17. Action and purpose.Richard Taylor - 1966 - New York,: Humanities Press.
  18. Truthmakers, entailment and necessity.Greg Restall - 1996 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 74 (2):331 – 340.
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  19. Multiple Conclusions.Greg Restall - 2005 - In Petr Hájek, Luis Valdés-Villanueva & Dag Westerståhl (eds.), Logic, Methodology and Philosophy of Science. College Publications.
    Our topic is the notion of logical consequence: the link between premises and conclusions, the glue that holds together deductively valid argument. How can we understand this relation between premises and conclusions? It seems that any account begs questions. Painting with very broad brushtrokes, we can sketch the landscape of disagreement like this: “Realists” prefer an analysis of logical consequence in terms of the preservation of truth [29]. “Anti-realists” take this to be unhelpful and o:er alternative analyses. Some, like Dummett, (...)
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  20.  38
    Time and Narrative.Terri Graves Taylor - 1985 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 18 (3):180-183.
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  21. Free will is about choosing: The link between choice and the belief in free will.Gilad Feldman, Roy Baumeister & Kin Fai Wong - 2014 - Journal of Experimental Social Psychology 55:239-245.
    Expert opinions have yielded a wide and controversial assortment of conceptions of free will, but laypersons seem to associate free will more simply with making choices. We found that the more strongly people believed in free will, the more they liked making choices, the higher they rated their ability to make decisions (Study 1), the less difficult they perceived making decisions, and the more satisfied they were with their decisions (Study 2). High free will belief was also associated with more (...)
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  22. Naturalizing ethics.Owen Flanagan, Hagop Sarkissian & David Wong - 2007 - In Walter Sinnott Armstrong (ed.), Moral Psychology, Vol. 1: The Evolution of Morality: Adaptations and Innateness. Cambridge, MA, USA: pp. 1-26.
    In this essay we provide (1) an argument for why ethics should be naturalized, (2) an analysis of why it is not yet naturalized, (3) a defense of ethical naturalism against two fallacies—Hume’s and Moore’s—that ethical naturalism allegedly commits, and (4) a proposal that normative ethics is best conceived as part of human ecology committed to pluralistic relativism. We explain why naturalizing ethics both entails relativism and also constrains it, and why nihilism about value is not an especially worrisome for (...)
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  23. Ways Things Can't Be.Greg Restall - 1997 - Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 38 (4):583-596.
    Paraconsistent logics are often semantically motivated by considering "impossible worlds." Lewis, in "Logic for equivocators," has shown how we can understand paraconsistent logics by attributing equivocation of meanings to inconsistent believers. In this paper I show that we can understand paraconsistent logics without attributing such equivocation. Impossible worlds are simply sets of possible worlds, and inconsistent believers (inconsistently) believe that things are like each of the worlds in the set. I show that this account gives a sound and complete semantics (...)
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  24. Information flow and relevant logics.Greg Restall - 1996 - In Jerry Seligman & Dag Westerstahl (eds.), Logic, Language and Computation. Center for the Study of Language and Inf. pp. 463–477.
  25.  80
    Bad is freer than good: Positive–negative asymmetry in attributions of free will.Gilad Feldman, Kin Fai Ellick Wong & Roy F. Baumeister - 2016 - Consciousness and Cognition 42:26-40.
    Recent findings support the idea that the belief in free will serves as the basis for moral responsibility, thus promoting the punishment of immoral agents. We theorized that free will extends beyond morality to serve as the basis for accountability and the capacity for change more broadly, not only for others but also for the self. Five experiments showed that people attributed higher freedom of will to negative than to positive valence, regardless of morality or intent, for both self and (...)
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  26.  30
    Logical methods.Greg Restall & Shawn Standefer - 2023 - Cambridge, Massachusetts: The MIT Press. Edited by Shawn Standefer.
    An advanced-level logic textbook that presents proof construction on equal footing with model building. Potentially relevant to students of mathematics and computer science as well.
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  27. Truth Values and Proof Theory.Greg Restall - 2009 - Studia Logica 92 (2):241-264.
    I present an account of truth values for classical logic, intuitionistic logic, and the modal logic S5, in which truth values are not a fundamental category from which the logic is defined, but rather, an idealisation of more fundamental logical features in the proof theory for each system. The result is not a new set of semantic structures, but a new understanding of how the existing semantic structures may be understood in terms of a more fundamental notion of logical consequence.
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  28. Logical consequence: A defense of Tarski.Greg Ray - 1996 - Journal of Philosophical Logic 25 (6):617 - 677.
    In his classic 1936 essay "On the Concept of Logical Consequence", Alfred Tarski used the notion of satisfaction to give a semantic characterization of the logical properties. Tarski is generally credited with introducing the model-theoretic characterization of the logical properties familiar to us today. However, in his book, The Concept of Logical Consequence, Etchemendy argues that Tarski's account is inadequate for quite a number of reasons, and is actually incompatible with the standard model-theoretic account. Many of his criticisms are meant (...)
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  29. The Role of Culture and Gender in the Relationship between Positive and Negative Affect.Richard P. Bagozzi, Nancy Wong & Youjae Yi - 1999 - Cognition and Emotion 13 (6):641-672.
    An integrative explanation proposes that culture and gender interact to produce fundamentally different patterns of association between positive and negative emotions. People in independent-based cultures (e.g. the United States) experience emotions in oppositional (i.e. bipolar) ways, whereas people in interdependent-based cultures (e.g. China) experience emotions in dialectic ways. These patterns are stronger for women than men in both cultures. In support of the theory, Study 1 showed that positive and negative emotions are strongly correlated inversely for American women and weakly (...)
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  30. Sitting in the dock of the bay, watching ….Jeremy Fernando - 2013 - Continent 3 (2):8-12.
    This piece, included in the drift special issue of continent. , was created as one step in a thread of inquiry. While each of the contributions to drift stand on their own, the project was an attempt to follow a line of theoretical inquiry as it passed through time and the postal service(s) from October 2012 until May 2013. This issue hosts two threads: between space & place and between intention & attention . The editors recommend that to experience the (...)
     
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  31.  16
    Complete Axiomatizations for Reasoning about Knowledge and Branching Time.Ron van der Meyden & Ka-shu Wong - 2003 - Studia Logica 75 (1):93-123.
    Sound and complete axiomatizations are provided for a number of different logics involving modalities for the knowledge of multiple agents and operators for branching time, extending previous work of Halpern, van der Meyden and Vardi [to appear, SIAM Journal on Computing] for logics of knowledge and linear time. The paper considers the system constraints of synchrony, perfect recall and unique initial states, which give rise to interaction axioms. The language is based on the temporal logic CTL*, interpreted with respect to (...)
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  32. Meaning and Truth.Greg Ray - 2014 - Mind 123 (489):79-100.
    This paper concerns a key point of decision in Donald Davidson's early work in philosophy of language — a fateful decision that set him and the discourse in the area on the path of truth-theoretic semantics. The decision of moment is the one Davidson makes when, in the face of a certain barrier, he gives up on the idea of constructing an explicit meaning theory that would parallel Tarski's recursive way with truth theory. For Davidson there was little choice: he (...)
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  33. The Geometry of Non-Distributive Logics.Greg Restall & Francesco Paoli - 2005 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 70 (4):1108 - 1126.
    In this paper we introduce a new natural deduction system for the logic of lattices, and a number of extensions of lattice logic with different negation connectives. We provide the class of natural deduction proofs with both a standard inductive definition and a global graph-theoretical criterion for correctness, and we show how normalisation in this system corresponds to cut elimination in the sequent calculus for lattice logic. This natural deduction system is inspired both by Shoesmith and Smiley's multiple conclusion systems (...)
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  34. Laws of Non-Contradiction, Laws of the Excluded Middle, and Logics.Greg Restall - 2004 - In Graham Priest, J. C. Beall & Bradley Armour-Garb (eds.), The Law of Non-Contradiction: New Philosophical Essays. Clarendon Press.
  35. Molinism and the thin red line.Greg Restall - unknown
    Molinism is an attempt to do equal justice to divine foreknowledge and human freedom. For Molinists, human freedom fits in this universe for the future is open or unsettled. However, God’s middle knowledge — God’s contingent knowledge of what agents would freely do in this or that circumstance — underwrites God’s omniscience in the midst of this openness. In this paper I rehearse Nuel Belnap and Mitchell Green’s argument in “Indeterminism and the Thin Red Line ” against the reality of (...)
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  36.  60
    On the Matter of Essential Richness.Greg Ray - 2005 - Journal of Philosophical Logic 34 (4):433-457.
    Alfred Tarski (1944) wrote that "the condition of the 'essential richness' of the metalanguage proves to be, not only necessary, but also sufficient for the construction of a satisfactory definition of truth." But it has remained unclear what Tarski meant by an 'essentially richer' metalanguage. Moreover, DeVidi and Solomon (1999) have argued in this Journal that there is nothing that Tarski could have meant by that phrase which would make his pronouncement true. We develop an answer to the historical question (...)
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  37. Modelling truthmaking.Greg Restall - 2000 - Logique Et Analyse 43 (169-170):211-230.
    According to one tradition in realist philosophy, 'truthmaking' amounts to necessitation. That is, an object x is a truthmaker for the claim A if x exists, and the existence of x necessitates the truth of A. I argued in my paper "Truthmakers, Entailment and Necessity" [14], that if we wish to use this account of truthmaking, we ought understand the entailment connective "=>" in such a claim as a relevant entailment, in the tradition of Anderson and Belnap and their co-workers (...)
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  38.  45
    Minimalists about truth can (and should) be epistemicists, and it helps if they are revision theorists too.Greg Restall - 2005 - In J. C. Beall & Bradley Armour-Garb (eds.), Deflationism and Paradox. Clarendon Press.
  39.  59
    Kripke & the existential complaint.Greg Ray - 1994 - Philosophical Studies 74 (2):121 - 135.
    Famously, Saul Kripke proposes that there are contingent a priori truths, and has offered a number of examples to illustrate his claim. The most well-known example involves the standard meter bar in Paris. Purportedly, a certain agent knows a priori that the bar is one meter long. However, in response to a long-standing objection to such examples - the "existential complaint" - generally only modified examples having a conditional form are now considered candidates for the contingent a priori. Gareth Evans (...)
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  40.  59
    Models for substructural arithmetics.Greg Restall - 2010
    This paper explores models for arithmetic in substructural logics. In the existing literature on substructural arithmetic, frame semantics for substructural logics are absent. We will start to fill in the picture in this paper by examining frame semantics for the substructural logics C , R and CK . The eventual goal is to find negation complete models for arithmetic in R.
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  41.  24
    Problems of moral philosophy.Paul W. Taylor - 1967 - Encino, Calif.,: Dickenson Pub. Co..
  42.  66
    Tarski and the metalinguistic liar.Greg Ray - 2003 - Philosophical Studies 115 (1):55 - 80.
    I offer an interpretation of a familiar, but poorly understood portion of Tarskis work on truth – bringing to light a number of unnoticed aspects of Tarskis work. A serious misreading of this part of Tarski to be found in Scott Soames Understanding Truth is treated in detail. Soamesreading vies with the textual evidence, and would make Tarskis position inconsistent in an unsubtle way. I show that Soames does not finally have a coherent interpretation of Tarski. This is unfortunate, since (...)
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  43. Łukasiewicz, Supervaluations and the Future.Greg Restall - 2005 - Logic and Philosophy of Science 3:1-10.
    A B S T R AC T: In this paper I consider an interpretation of future contingents which motivates a unification of a Łukasiewicz-style logic with the more classical supervaluational semantics. This in turn motivates a new non-classical logic modelling what is “made true by history up until now. ” I give a simple Hilbert-style proof theory, and a soundness and completeness argument for the proof theory with respect to the intended models.
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  44.  52
    Models for liars in bradwardine's theory of truth.Greg Restall - manuscript
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  45. Substructural Logics.Greg Restall - forthcoming - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    summary of work in relevant in the Anderson– tradition.]; Mares Troestra, Anne, 1992, Lectures on , CSLI Publications [A quick, easy-to.
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  46.  10
    The Role of Culture and Gender in the Relationship between Positive and Negative Affect.Richard P. Bagozzi, Nancy Wong & Youjae Yi - 1999 - Cognition and Emotion 13 (6):641-672.
    An integrative explanation proposes that culture and gender interact to produce fundamentally different patterns of association between positive and negative emotions. People in independent-based cultures (e.g. the United States) experience emotions in oppositional (i.e. bipolar) ways, whereas people in interdependent-based cultures (e.g. China) experience emotions in dialectic ways. These patterns are stronger for women than men in both cultures. In support of the theory, Study 1 showed that positive and negative emotions are strongly correlated inversely for American women and weakly (...)
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  47.  20
    Disability, Work and Motivation.Greg Marston & Jeremy Moss - 2009 - Monash Bioethics Review 28 (4):13-24.
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  48. Modalities in substructural logics.Greg Restall - 1992 - Logique Et Analyse 35:303-321.
  49.  35
    Regulatory Sanctions on Independent Directors and Their Consequences to the Director Labor Market: Evidence from China.Michael Firth, Sonia Wong, Qingquan Xin & Ho Yin Yick - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 134 (4):693-708.
    We investigate the regulatory sanctions imposed on independent directors for their firms’ financial frauds in China. These regulatory sanctions are prima-facie evidence of significant lapses in business ethics. During the period 2003–2010, 302-person-time independent directors were penalized by the regulator, and the two stock exchanges. We find that the independent directors with accounting experiences are more likely to be penalized by the CSRC, though they do not suffer more severe penalties than do the other sanctioned independent directors. We also find (...)
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  50. Ontology-free modal semantics.Greg Ray - 1996 - Journal of Philosophical Logic 25 (4):333 - 361.
    The problem with model-theoretic modal semantics is that it provides only the formal beginnings of an account of the semantics of modal languages. In the case of non-modal language, we bridge the gap between semantics and mere model theory, by claiming that a sentence is true just in case it is true in an intended model. Truth in a model is given by the model theory, and an intended model is a model which has as domain the actual objects of (...)
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