Results for 'Tom Moylan'

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  1.  26
    Proceedings of the 4th World Conference on Research Integrity: Brazil, Rio de Janeiro. 31 May - 3 June 2015.Lex Bouter, Melissa S. Anderson, Ana Marusic, Sabine Kleinert, Susan Zimmerman, Paulo S. L. Beirão, Laura Beranzoli, Giuseppe Di Capua, Silvia Peppoloni, Maria Betânia de Freitas Marques, Adriana Sousa, Claudia Rech, Torunn Ellefsen, Adele Flakke Johannessen, Jacob Holen, Raymond Tait, Jillon Van der Wall, John Chibnall, James M. DuBois, Farida Lada, Jigisha Patel, Stephanie Harriman, Leila Posenato Garcia, Adriana Nascimento Sousa, Cláudia Maria Correia Borges Rech, Oliveira Patrocínio, Raphaela Dias Fernandes, Laressa Lima Amâncio, Anja Gillis, David Gallacher, David Malwitz, Tom Lavrijssen, Mariusz Lubomirski, Malini Dasgupta, Katie Speanburg, Elizabeth C. Moylan, Maria K. Kowalczuk, Nikolas Offenhauser, Markus Feufel, Niklas Keller, Volker Bähr, Diego Oliveira Guedes, Douglas Leonardo Gomes Filho, Vincent Larivière, Rodrigo Costas, Daniele Fanelli, Mark William Neff, Aline Carolina de Oliveira Machado Prata, Limbanazo Matandika, Sonia Maria Ramos de Vasconcelos & Karina de A. Rocha - 2016 - Research Integrity and Peer Review 1 (Suppl 1).
    Table of contentsI1 Proceedings of the 4th World Conference on Research IntegrityConcurrent Sessions:1. Countries' systems and policies to foster research integrityCS01.1 Second time around: Implementing and embedding a review of responsible conduct of research policy and practice in an Australian research-intensive universitySusan Patricia O'BrienCS01.2 Measures to promote research integrity in a university: the case of an Asian universityDanny Chan, Frederick Leung2. Examples of research integrity education programmes in different countriesCS02.1 Development of a state-run “cyber education program of research ethics” in (...)
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  2.  7
    The Necessity of Hope in Dystopian Times: A Critical Reflection.Tom Moylan - 2020 - Utopian Studies 31 (1):164-193.
    Dystopias matter because they make us think. They help us to imagine and envisage how the present can change into something very nasty. … Dystopias thus interrogate the now and offer warnings and sometimes prophecies about the future; they are often the jeremiads of utopianism. But sometimes they offer glimmers of hope.One way of being anti-anti-utopian is to be utopian. It's crucial to keep imagining that things could get better, and furthermore to imagine how they might get better. … So (...)
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  3.  25
    “To Live Consciously Is to Sow the Whirlwind”.Tom Moylan - 2015 - Utopian Studies 26 (1):183-202.
    I begin with a poem published by e. e. cummings in 1931. It grew out of his service in the U.S. Army in World War I. Having already seen a fellow recruit abused for refusing to fight during training camp in Massachusetts, while serving on the French front cummings learned of another soldier heard speaking against the war by his commanding officer, who then oversaw his torture by fellow soldiers and ordered his imprisonment. Throughout, the soldier continued to condemn the (...)
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  4.  36
    Introduction: The Once and Future Orpheus.Ruth Levitas & Tom Moylan - 2010 - Utopian Studies 21 (2):204-214.
  5.  8
    Transgressive, Totalizing, Transformative: Utopia's Utopian Surplus.Tom Moylan - 2018 - Utopian Studies 29 (3):309.
    Do I dareDisturb the universe?In part 2 of his volume of short stories, Subcomandante Marcos gives us several tales featuring a dialogue between his fictional self and a wise Mayan peasant, Don Antonio.1 In these conversations, Old Antonio teaches Marcos about the accumulated experience and wisdom of the indigenous people of Chiapas so that he can better understand that their struggle must grow out of the concrete conditions of their past and present realities rather than be governed by abstract theory.In (...)
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  6.  17
    Mission Impossible? Liberation Theology and Utopian Praxis.Tom Moylan - 1991 - Utopian Studies 3:20-30.
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  7. Introduction: Jameson and Utopia.Tom Moylan - 1998 - Utopian Studies 9 (2):1-7.
  8. Exploring the Utopian Impulse: Essays on Utopian Thought and Practice.Michael J. Griffin & Tom Moylan (eds.) - 2007 - Peter Lang.
  9.  5
    Exploring the Utopian Impulse: Essays on Utopian Thought and Practice. Vol. 2 of the Ralahine Utopian Studies by Michael J. Griffin, Tom Moylan[REVIEW]Lyman Tower Sargent - 2008 - Utopian Studies 19 (2):349-352.
  10.  6
    Moylan and Dystopia.Gregory Claeys - 2020 - Utopian Studies 31 (1):194-203.
    I am grateful to the editor of this journal for the opportunity to respond to Tom Moylan's comments on my Dystopia: A Natural History. There are some serious misapprehensions about my arguments in Moylan's treatment, as well as a failure to engage with some of the central themes of the book. Substantial differences also clearly exist between my approach and Moylan's approach to the subject of dystopia and indeed to scholarly engagement in general. Illuminating these further might (...)
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  11.  47
    Invariant Reversible QEEG Effects of Anesthetics.E. R. John, L. S. Prichep, W. Kox, P. Valdés-Sosa, J. Bosch-Bayard, E. Aubert, M. Tom, F. diMichele & L. D. Gugino - 2001 - Consciousness and Cognition 10 (2):165-183.
    Continuous recordings of brain electrical activity were obtained from a group of 176 patients throughout surgical procedures using general anesthesia. Artifact-free data from the 19 electrodes of the International 10/20 System were subjected to quantitative analysis of the electroencephalogram (QEEG). Induction was variously accomplished with etomidate, propofol or thiopental. Anesthesia was maintained throughout the procedures by isoflurane, desflurane or sevoflurane (N = 68), total intravenous anesthesia using propofol (N = 49), or nitrous oxide plus narcotics (N = 59). A set (...)
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  12. Beyond Triton : Samuel R. Delany's Critical Utopianism and the Colliding Worlds in "We, in Some Strange Power's Employ, Move on a Rigorous Line". [REVIEW]Mark A. Tabone - 2013 - Utopian Studies 24 (2):184-215.
    It would be difficult to overstate the impact of the work of Samuel R. Delany on the often-overlapping fields of science fiction (sf) studies and utopian studies. In his well-known 1982 essay, “Progress Versus Utopia, or, Can We Imagine the Future?” Fredric Jameson argues that Delany, along with Ursula Le Guin, Marge Piercy, and Joanna Russ, is among a socially engaged group of visionary authors who revivified the utopian imagination in sf during the 1960s and 1970s, and he cites Delany’s (...)
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  13.  24
    Dystopia, Utopia, and “Home” in Toni Morrison's Home.Mark A. Tabone - 2018 - Utopian Studies 29 (3):291.
    At the dreamlike conclusion of Toni Morrison’s 1998 novel Paradise, two women, Piedade and Consolata, watch a ship head into port. Its crew and passengers prepare for a moment of rest, writes Morrison, “before shouldering the endless work they were created to do down here in Paradise.”1 After more than three hundred pages dedicated, as Tom Moylan observes, to confronting “the complexities of Utopia itself,”2 Morrison’s final words on utopia contain two critical ideas worth unpacking.First, Morrison posits paradise in (...)
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  14.  13
    Rethinking Utopia: Power, Place, Affect by David M. Bell.Adam Stock - 2019 - Utopian Studies 30 (1):118-125.
    It used to be that a book on utopia that did not quote Oscar Wilde's homily about a map of the world without utopia was itself not worth glancing at, for it left out the one thing we thought we could all agree on. But what if the world map only serves to reinforce the systems of domination inherent to colonialism, racism, capitalism, and patriarchy? And why should the quest for utopia take us to the high seas anyway, rather than (...)
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  15.  12
    Tlön: Journey to a Utopian Civilisation by Aristidis G. Romanos.Antonis Balasopoulos - 2017 - Utopian Studies 28 (2):354-361.
    That utopia as a literary genre has suffered death, attenuation, transmutation, or dystopic inversion not too long ago, and at any rate by the last quarter of the twentieth century, is a widespread and well-established view among most of the critical thinkers in utopian studies. In his most recent foray on the subject, Fredric Jameson begins his "An American Utopia" by observing that "we have seen a marked diminution in the production of new utopias over the last decades," particularly after (...)
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  16.  7
    Distopia: Fragmentos de Um Céu Límpido Ed. By Ildney Cavalcanti and Felipe Benicio.Jaqueline Pierazzo - 2017 - Utopian Studies 28 (3):695-699.
    Tom Moylan's Scraps of the Untainted Sky: Science Fiction, Utopia, Dystopia was first published in the year 2000. Seventeen years later, this work still enlightens discussions and catches the attention of both science fiction and Utopian studies. Still, we have to acknowledge the fact that we are facing a belated translation. This could easily be a problem if the present edition had not provided a new perspective on Moylan's Scraps. This edition, brought together by the Brazilian research group (...)
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  17.  10
    Utopian Studies in Ireland.Michael G. Kelly - 2016 - Utopian Studies 27 (3):457-467.
    Writing in a special issue of this journal dedicated to the theme “Irish Utopias” almost a decade ago, Tom Moylan framed in explicitly spatial terms the historical complexity of the utopian problematic in the Irish context and posited the existence of “a ‘utopian’ strain in Irish culture”: “[The] proclivity to imagine … hopeful other places, to think possibility by way of places that are, simultaneously, specifically located, bounded, and yet open and potentially transformative takes many forms in the Irish (...)
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  18. Invariant Reversible QEEG Effects of Anesthetics - Volume 10, Number 2 (2001), Pages 165-183.E. R. John, L. S. Prichep, W. Kox, P. Valdes-Sosa, J. Bosch-Bayard, E. Aubert, M. Tom, F. diMichele & L. D. Gugino - 2002 - Consciousness and Cognition 11 (1):138-138.
     
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  19. Tom Regan on Kind Arguments Against Animal Rights and for Human Rights.Nathan Nobis - 2016 - In Mylan Engel Jr & Gary Comstock (eds.), The Moral Rights of Animals. Lexington Books. pp. 65-80.
    Tom Regan argues that human beings and some non-human animals have moral rights because they are “subjects of lives,” that is, roughly, conscious, sentient beings with an experiential welfare. A prominent critic, Carl Cohen, objects: he argues that only moral agents have rights and so animals, since they are not moral agents, lack rights. An objection to Cohen’s argument is that his theory of rights seems to imply that human beings who are not moral agents have no moral rights, but (...)
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  20. "We Are All Noah: Tom Regan's Olive Branch to Religious Animal Ethics".Matthew C. Halteman - 2018 - Between the Species 21 (Regan: In Memorium):151-177.
    For the past thirty years, the late Tom Regan bucked the trend among secular animal rights philosophers and spoke patiently and persistently to the best angels of religious ethics in a stream of publications that enjoins religious scholars, clergy, and lay people alike to rediscover the resources within their traditions for articulating and living out an animal ethics that is more consistent with their professed values of love, mercy, and justice. My aim in this article is to showcase some of (...)
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  21.  93
    Tom Regan's Seafaring Dog and (Un) Equal Inherent Worth.Rem B. Edwards - 1993 - Between the Species 9 (4):231-235.
    Tom Regan's seafaring dog that is justifiably thrown out of the lifeboat built for four to save the lives of four humans has been the topic of much discussion. Critics have argued in a variety of ways that this dog nips at Regan's Achilles heel. Without reviewing previous discussions, with much of which I certainly agree, this article develops an unexplored approach to exposing the vulnerability of the position that Regan takes on sacrificing the dog to save the humans. It (...)
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  22.  64
    Filosofia, Tom E ilusão musical em Kant. Da vivificação sonora do ânimo à recepção do Tom da razão.Nuria Sánchez Madrid - 2012 - Trans/Form/Ação 35 (1):47-72.
    O artigo tenciona, primeiramente, enriquecer o estudo da função que o conceito de tom desempenha na ideia kantiana de razão, ao estendê-lo à análise da música como arte dos sons que a Crítica do Juízo contém. Em segundo lugar, propõe-se determinar os motivos pelos quais a matemática se revela incapaz, devido à especificidade do método filosófico e à corporalidade da ecepção musical, respectivamente, de expressar o modo de proceder da razão e da arte dos sons. Finalmente, aponta-se para uma semelhança (...)
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  23.  46
    Real Men Are Stoics: An Interpretation of Tom Wolfe's A Man in Full.William O. Stephens - 2000 - Stoic Voice Journal 1 (3).
    Charlie Croker, a self-made real estate tycoon, ex-Georgia Tech football star, horseback rider, quail-hunter, snakecatcher, and good old boy from Baker county Georgia, is the protagonist in Tom Wolfe’s latest novel, the deliciously provocative A Man in Full (New York: Farrar Straus Giroux, 1998).  In this article I examine the evolving conception of manhood in Wolfe’s novel.  Two different models of manliness will be delineated and compared. The first model—represented by Charlie Croker—gradually weakens and is replaced by the (...)
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  24.  23
    Mohandas K. Gandhi and Tom Regan: Advocates for Animal Rights.Rainer Ebert - 2017 - Gandhi Marg Quarterly 38:395-403.
  25.  32
    Thieves of Virtue: When Bioethics Stole Medicine by Tom Koch (Review).Tom L. Beauchamp - 2014 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 24 (3):11-14.
    The principal thesis in this book is that bioethics emerged—in the 1960s through the 1980s—under the influence of philosophers who claimed to have universally valid principles that could steer medicine and research to the solution of ethical problems, including even those arising at the bedside of patients. Tom Koch contends that these philosophers and their allied bioethicists “stole medicine” and its traditional values, substituting a philosophical discourse generally inaccessible to the average person. Philosophers thereby refashioned medical ethics in accordance with (...)
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  26.  18
    Review of Tom L. Beauchamp and David DeGrazia PRINCIPLES OF ANIMAL RESEARCH ETHICS. [REVIEW]Nathan Nobis - forthcoming - Bioethics.
    . . Tom Beauchamp and David DeGrazia's principles do improve upon the 3Rs which don’t mention the need for benefits from animal experimentation, the need to compare these benefits to animal harms, and provide no hard limits on experimentation. -/- However, they present their principles as “useful” for people engaged in animal research and as a “philosophically sound” (p. 4) framework for a new ethic for animal research. Regrettably, I have doubts about both these overall claims and so am pessimistic (...)
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  27. Epistemic Instrumentalism and Reasons for Belief: A Reply to Tom Kelly's "Epistemic Rationality as Instrumental Rationality: A Critique".Adam Leite - 2007 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 75 (2):456–464.
    Tom Kelly argues that instrumentalist aeeounts of epistemie rationality fail beeause what a person has reason to believe does not depend upon the eontent of his or her goals. However, his argument fails to distinguish questions about what the evidence supports from questions about what a person ought to believe. Once these are distinguished, the instrumentalist ean avoid Kelly’s objeetions. The paperconcludes by sketehing what I take to be the most defensible version of the instrumentalist view.
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  28. How We Think Mādhyamikas Think: A Response To Tom Tillemans.Yasuo Deguchi, Jay L. Garfield & Graham Priest - 2013 - Philosophy East and West 63 (3):426-435.
    In his article in this issue, " 'How do Mādhyamikas Think?' Revisited," Tom Tillemans reflects on his earlier article "How do Mādhyamikas Think?" (2009), itself a response to earlier work of ours (Deguchi et al. 2008; Garfield and Priest 2003). There is much we agree with in these non-dogmatic and open-minded essays. Still, we have some disagreements. We begin with a response to Tillemans' first thoughts, and then turn to his second thoughts.Tillemans (2009) maintains that it is wrong to attribute (...)
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  29.  27
    Time and Truth: The Presentism-Eternalism Debate: Tom Stoneham.Tom Stoneham - 2009 - Philosophy 84 (2):201-218.
    There are many questions we can ask about time, but perhaps the most fundamental is whether there are metaphysically interesting differences between past, present and future events. An eternalist believes in a block universe: past, present and future events are all on an equal footing. A gradualist believes in a growing block: he agrees with the eternalist about the past and the present but not about the future. A presentist believes that what is present has a special status. My first (...)
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  30.  89
    Epistemic Instrumentalism and Reasons for Belief: A Reply to Tom Kelly’s “Epistemic Rationality as Instrumental Rationality: A Critique”.Adam Leite - 2007 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 75 (2):456-464.
    Tom Kelly argues that instrumentalist aeeounts of epistemie rationality fail beeause what a person has reason to believe does not depend upon the eontent of his or her goals. However, his argument fails to distinguish questions about what the evidence supports from questions about what a person ought to believe. Once these are distinguished, the instrumentalist ean avoid Kelly’s objeetions. The paperconcludes by sketehing what I take to be the most defensible version of the instrumentalist view.
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  31.  11
    Tom Regan’s Philosophy of Animal Rights: Subjects-of-a-Life in the Context of Discussions of Intrinsic and Inherent Worth.Erwin Lengauer - 2020 - Problemos 97.
    Modern animal rights debates began in the 1970s, mainly as part of the budding field of applied ethics in Anglo-American philosophy. In just a short time, these animal rights discourses received international academic respect, especially through analytically trained philosophers. Central for this development was the analysis that rights language can be principally used species neutrally. This paper’s contribution is to examine the central terms of Tom Regan’s still widely discussed theory for their actuality and usefulness. Hence strengthening these arguments for (...)
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  32. Multi-Dimensional Utility and the Index Number Problem: Jeremy Bentham, J. S. Mill, and Qualitative Hedonism: Tom Warke.Tom Warke - 2000 - Utilitas 12 (2):176-203.
    This article develops an unconventional perspective on the utilitarianism of Bentham and Mill in at least four areas. First, it is shown that both authors conceived of utility as irreducibly multi-dimensional, and that Bentham in particular was very much aware of the ambiguity that multi-dimensionality imposes upon optimal choice under the greatest happiness principle. Secondly, I argue that any attribution of intrinsic worth to any form of human behaviour violates the first principles of Bentham's and Mill's utilitarianism, and that this (...)
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  33.  50
    Quine’s Poor Tom.Tristan Grøtvedt Haze - 2019 - European Journal of Analytic Philosophy 15 (1):5-16.
    Section 31 of Quine's Word and Object contains an eyebrow-raising argument, purporting to show that if an agent, Tom, believes one truth and one falsity and has some basic logical acumen, and if belief contexts are always transparent, then Tom believes everything. Over the decades this argument has been debated inconclusively. In this paper I clarify the situation and show that the trouble stems from bad presentation on Quine’s part.
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  34.  39
    Revisiting Tom Tom: Performative Anamnesis and Autonomous Vision in Ken Jacobs’ Appropriations of Tom Tom the Piper’s Son.Edwin Carels - 2018 - Foundations of Science 23 (2):217-230.
    In 1969 the American avant-garde filmmaker Ken Jacobs gained wide recognition with a two-hour long interpretation of a 1905 silent short film. Ever since, the artist has kept on revisiting the same material, each time with a different technological approach. Originally hailed as a prime example of structural filmmaking, Jacobs’ more recent variations on the theme of Tom Tom the Piper’s Son beg for a broader understanding of his methods and the meanings implied. To gain a deeper insight in this (...)
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  35.  90
    The Right to Privacy and the Right to Die: TOM L. BEAUCHAMP.Tom L. Beauchamp - 2000 - Social Philosophy and Policy 17 (2):276-292.
    Western ethics and law have been slow to come to conclusions about the right to choose the time and manner of one's death. However, policies, practices, and legal precedents have evolved quickly in the last quarter of the twentieth century, from the forgoing of respirators to the use of Do Not Resuscitate orders, to the forgoing of all medical technologies, and now, in one U.S. state, to legalized physician-assisted suicide. The sweep of history—from the Quinlan case in New Jersey to (...)
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  36. The Inaugural Address: Kantian Modality: Tom Baldwin.Tom Baldwin - 2002 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 76 (1):1–24.
    Kant's claim that modality is a 'category' provides an approach to modality to be contrasted with Lewis's reductive analysis. Lewis's position is unsatisfactory, since it depends on an inherently modal conception of a world. This suggests that modality is 'primitive'; and the Kantian position is a prima facie plausible position of this kind, which is filled out by considering the relationship between modality and inference. This provides a context for comparing the Kantian position with Wright's non-cognitivist 'conventionalism'. Wright's position is (...)
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  37.  79
    Eugenics and the Criticism of Bioethics: Ann Kerr and Tom Shakespeare, Genetic Politics: From Eugenics to Genome, Cheltenham: New Clarion Press, 2002, ISBN 1 873797 25 7, ISBN 1 873 797 26 5.Stephen Wilkinson - 2007 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 10 (4):409-418.
    This article provides a critical assessment of some aspects of Ann Kerr and Tom Shakespeare's Genetic Politics: from eugenics to genome. In particular, I evaluate their claims: (a) that bioethics is too ‘top down’, involving normative prescriptions, whereas it should instead be ‘bottom up’ and grounded in social science; and (b) that contemporary bioethics has not dealt particularly well with people's moral concerns about eugenics. I conclude that several of Kerr and Shakespeare's criticisms are well-founded and serve as valuable reminders (...)
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  38.  79
    Tom Seppalainen, Review of Through the Rearview Mirror: Historical Reflections on Psychology by John Macnamara. [REVIEW]Tom Seppalainen - 2000 - Philosophy of Science 67 (3):549-551.
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  39.  26
    The Inaugural Address: Kantian Modality: Tom Baldwin.Tom Baldwin - 2002 - Supplement to the Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 76 (1):1-24.
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  40.  48
    Hume – Cyber-Hume – Enactive Hume. Interview with Tom Froese.Tom Froese, Karolina Karmaza, Przemysław Nowakowski & Witold Wachowski - 2011 - Avant: Trends in Interdisciplinary Studies 2 (1).
    David Hume; Enactivism; Cognitive Science; Phenomenology; Philosophy of mind.
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  41.  25
    Wight, Tom 1998 - Paul Us van Tarsus: Een Kennismaking Met Zijn Tbeologie.Tom Wight - 1999 - Hts Theological Studies 55 (4).
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  42. What Peeping Tom Did Wrong.John Draeger - 2011 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 14 (1):41-49.
    Voyeurism seems creepy. This paper considers whether these feelings are well-founded. It identifies a variety of ethically troubling features, including harmful consequences, deceit, and the violation of various religious, legal, and conventional norms. Voyeurism is something of a moral misdemeanor that seems worrisome when associated with these other failings. However, because voyeurism remains troubling even in the absence of harm or deceit, we must pay special attention to the ways complex social conventions can be used to show disrespect for others. (...)
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  43. Principles of Biomedical Ethics / Tom L. Beauchamp, James F. Childress.Tom L. Beauchamp - 1994 - Oxford University Press.
    This is an extremely thorough revision of the leading textbook of bioethics. The authors have made many improvements in style, organization, argument and content. These changes reflect advances in the bioethics literature over the past five years. The most dramatic expansions of the text are in the comprehensiveness with which the authors treat different currents in ethical theory and the greater breadth and depth of their discussion of public policy and public health issues. In every chapter, readers will find new (...)
     
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  44.  50
    Rockmore, Tom. Kant and Phenomenology. [REVIEW]Paul Symington - 2012 - Review of Metaphysics 66 (2):380-382.
    Book review of Tom Rockmore's "Kant & Phenomenology," which appeared in "Review of Metaphysics" in 2011.
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  45.  19
    Is Tom Shakespeare Disabled?T. Koch - 2008 - Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (1):18-20.
    Is Tom Shakespeare disabled, or simply distinct in stature? And if the latter, what makes that distinction important?For more than a decade, the British sociologist has been a critical voice in the sociology of difference. The son of a physician with achondroplasia “widely admired as a doctor and as a disabled role model” ,1 Shakespeare fils also has achondroplasia, is the father of children with the condition and, like his father, is professionally successful. As his book’s back cover announces, Shakespeare (...)
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  46.  24
    Fichte's Addresses to the German Nation Reconsidered Ed. By Daniel Breazeale and Tom Rockmore.F. Scott Scribner - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (3):548-549.
    Interpretation always takes place in the present tense. It is worth reminding ourselves of this, because few philosophical texts or treatises have suffered the rise and fall of the vagaries of their own contemporary Weltanschauung as Fichte's Addresses to the German Nation. Few texts in history have been simultaneously so overestimated and underestimated in their impact and importance as Fichte's Addresses; and therefore few texts can be said to be so misunderstood—and so need in of reassessment. This collection, Fichte's Addresses (...)
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  47.  32
    Interview: Tom Chappell.Tom Chappell & Craig Cox - 1994 - Business Ethics: The Magazine of Corporate Responsibility 8 (1):16-18.
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  48.  25
    The Unseen Déjà-Vu: From Erkki Huhtamo’s Topoi to Ken Jacobs’ Remakes: Commentary to Edwin Carels “Revisiting Tom Tom: Performative Anamnesis and Autonomous Vision in Ken Jacobs’ Appropriations of Tom Tom the Piper’s Son”.Wanda Strauven - 2018 - Foundations of Science 23 (2):231-236.
    This commentary on Edwin Carels’ essay “Revisiting Tom Tom: Performative anamnesis and autonomous vision in Ken Jacobs’ appropriations of Tom Tom the Piper’s Son” broadens up the media-archaeological framework in which Carels places his text. Notions such as Huhtamo’s topos and Zielinski’s “deep time” are brought into the discussion in order to point out the difficulty to see what there is to see and to question the position of the viewer in front of experimental films like Tom Tom the Piper’s (...)
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  49.  40
    Tom MELS (ed.), Reanimating Places : a Geography of Rhythms.Derek McCormack - forthcoming - Rhuthmos.
    T. Mels (ed.), Reanimating Places : a Geography of Rhythms, Aldershot : Ashgate, 2004, 278 p. Quelques pages sont accessibles ici. For geographers, rhythm is one of the most seductive and elusive of concepts. And, as Tom Mels's expansive introductory essay to this collection demonstrates, it is possible to trace the 'lineage of a geography of rhythms' through various theoretical and empirical trajectories. The content and tone of this volume is, however, dominated by one particular (...) - Recensions.
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  50.  22
    The Rights Approach to Mental Illness: Tom Campbell.Tom Campbell - 1984 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 18:221-253.
    The concept of rights is now so dominant in the language of politics that it is becoming difficult to identify its use with any particular approach to the solution of social problems or to gain a clear picture of its significance, its advantages and its disadvantages as a way of conceptualizing and resolving contentious political issues. None the less there is a perceptible shift towards an emphasis on rights in contemporary politics which many welcome and encourage and others question and (...)
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