Results for 'Vincent MacNamara'

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  1. Christian Moral Life.Vincent MacNamara - 2009 - In Enda McDonagh & Vincent MacNamara (eds.), An Irish Reader in Moral Theology: The Legacy of the Last Fifty Years. Columba Press.
     
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  2. Faith and Ethics: Recent Roman Catholicism.Vincent MacNamara - 1985 - Georgetown University Press.
     
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  3. The Call to Be Human: Making Sense of Morality.Vincent MacNamara - 2010 - Veritas.
     
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  4. An Irish Reader in Moral Theology: The Legacy of the Last Fifty Years.Enda McDonagh & Vincent MacNamara (eds.) - 2009 - Columba Press.
     
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  5. Language, Logic, and Concepts Essays in Memory of John Macnamara.John Theodore Macnamara, Ray Jackendoff, Paul Bloom & Karen Wynn - 1999
     
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  6.  58
    The Nature of Political Theory.Andrew Vincent - 2004 - Oxford University Press.
    In his controversial new book, Andrew Vincent offers a comprehensive, synoptic, and comparative analysis of the major conceptions of political theory throughout the twentieth century. The book challenges established views of contemporary political theory and provides critical perspectives on the future of the subject. It will be an indispensable resource for all scholars and students of the discipline.
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  7.  19
    Through the Rearview Mirror: Historical Reflections on Psychology.John Macnamara - 1999 - MIT Press.
    In this lively book, John Macnamara shows how a number of important thinkers through the ages have approached problems of mental representation and the ...
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  8.  24
    Gentile, Education and Mind.A. Vincent - 2014 - Collingwood and British Idealism Studies 20 (1-2):105-136.
    This essay explains and criticizes Gentile's attempts to connect his metaphysical theories with his ideas about education, and especially the relationship between education and nationalism. It begins with a critical examination of the distinguishing features of the view Gentile specifies in Theory of Mind as Pure Act. Vincent then considers Gentile's account of how this theory, for which mind is an act of perpetual self-creation, leads to a conception of education with an explicitly nationalist bent. His attempts to connect (...)
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  9. On the Relevance of Neuroscience to Criminal Responsibility.Nicole A. Vincent - 2010 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 4 (1):77-98.
    Various authors debate the question of whether neuroscience is relevant to criminal responsibility. However, a plethora of different techniques and technologies, each with their own abilities and drawbacks, lurks beneath the label “neuroscience”; and in criminal law responsibility is not a single, unitary and generic concept, but it is rather a syndrome of at least six different concepts. Consequently, there are at least six different responsibility questions that the criminal law asks—at least one for each responsibility concept—and, I will suggest, (...)
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  10. Holding Others Responsible.Coleen Macnamara - 2011 - Philosophical Studies 152 (1):81-102.
    Theorists have spent considerable time discussing the concept of responsibility. Their discussions, however, have generally focused on the question of who counts as responsible, and for what. But as Gary Watson has noted, “Responsibility is a triadic relationship: an individual (or group) is responsible to others for something” (Watson Agency and answerability: selected essays, 2004 , p. 7). Thus, theorizing about responsibility ought to involve theorizing not just about the actor and her conduct, but also about those the actor is (...)
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  11. Responsibility: Distinguishing Virtue From Capacity.Nicole A. Vincent - 2009 - Polish Journal of Philosophy 3 (1):111-26.
    Garrath Williams claims that truly responsible people must possess a “capacity … to respond [appropriately] to normative demands” (2008:462). However, there are people whom we would normally praise for their responsibility despite the fact that they do not yet possess such a capacity (e.g. consistently well-behaved young children), and others who have such capacity but who are still patently irresponsible (e.g. some badly-behaved adults). Thus, I argue that to qualify for the accolade “a responsible person” one need not possess such (...)
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  12. Beyond Belief: Toward a Theory of the Reactive Attitudes.Elisa A. Hurley & Coleen Macnamara - 2010 - Philosophical Papers 39 (3):373-399.
    Most moral theorists agree that it is one thing to believe that someone has slighted you and another to resent her for the insult; one thing to believe that someone did you a favor and another to feel gratitude toward her for her kindness. While all of these ways of responding to another's conduct are forms of moral appraisal, the reactive attitudes are said to 'go beyond' beliefs in some way. We think this claim is adequately explained only when we (...)
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  13. What Do You Mean I Should Take Responsibility for My Own Ill Health?Nicole A. Vincent - 2009 - Journal of Applied Ethics and Philosophy 1 (1):39-51.
    Luck egalitarians think that considerations of responsibility can excuse departures from strict equality. However critics argue that allowing responsibility to play this role has objectionably harsh consequences. Luck egalitarians usually respond either by explaining why that harshness is not excessive, or by identifying allegedly legitimate exclusions from the default responsibility-tracking rule to tone down that harshness. And in response, critics respectively deny that this harshness is not excessive, or they argue that those exclusions would be ineffective or lacking in justification. (...)
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  14.  89
    Neuroimaging and Responsibility Assessments.Nicole A. Vincent - 2011 - Neuroethics 4 (1):35-49.
    Could neuroimaging evidence help us to assess the degree of a person’s responsibility for a crime which we know that they committed? This essay defends an affirmative answer to this question. A range of standard objections to this high-tech approach to assessing people’s responsibility is considered and then set aside, but I also bring to light and then reject a novel objection—an objection which is only encountered when functional (rather than structural) neuroimaging is used to assess people’s responsibility.
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  15.  78
    Responsibility, Dysfunction and Capacity.Nicole A. Vincent - 2008 - Neuroethics 1 (3):199-204.
    The way in which we characterize the structural and functional differences between psychopath and normal brains – either as biological disorders or as mere biological differences – can influence our judgments about psychopaths’ responsibility for criminal misconduct. However, Marga Reimer (Neuroethics 1(2):14, 2008) points out that whether our characterization of these differences should be allowed to affect our judgments in this manner “is a difficult and important question that really needs to be addressed before policies regarding responsibility... can be implemented (...)
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  16. Equality, Responsibility and Talent Slavery.Nicole A. Vincent - 2006 - Imprints 9 (2):118-39.
    Egalitarians must address two questions: i. What should there be an equality of, which concerns the currency of the ‘equalisandum’; and ii. How should this thing be allocated to achieve the so-called equal distribution? A plausible initial composite answer to these two questions is that resources should be allocated in accordance with choice, because this way the resulting distribution of the said equalisandum will ‘track responsibility’ — responsibility will be tracked in the sense that only we will be responsible for (...)
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  17. Book Review of "Torts, Egalitarianism and Distributive Justice" by Tsachi Keren-Paz. [REVIEW]Nicole A. Vincent - 2008 - Australian Journal of Legal Philosophy 33:199-204.
    In "Torts, Egalitarianism and Distributive Justice" , Tsachi Keren-Paz presents impressingly detailed analysis that bolsters the case in favour of incremental tort law reform. However, although this book's greatest strength is the depth of analysis offered, at the same time supporters of radical law reform proposals may interpret the complexity of the solution that is offered as conclusive proof that tort law can only take adequate account of egalitarian aims at an unacceptably high cost.
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  18. Responsibility, Compensation and Accident Law Reform.Nicole A. Vincent - 2007 - Dissertation, University of Adelaide
    This thesis considers two allegations which conservatives often level at no-fault systems — namely, that responsibility is abnegated under no-fault systems, and that no-fault systems under- and over-compensate. I argue that although each of these allegations can be satisfactorily met – the responsibility allegation rests on the mistaken assumption that to properly take responsibility for our actions we must accept liability for those losses for which we are causally responsible; and the compensation allegation rests on the mistaken assumption that tort (...)
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  19.  24
    Moral Responsibility: Beyond Free Will and Determinism.Nicole Vincent, Ibo van de Poel & Jeroen van den Hoven (eds.) - 2011 - Springer.
    This book'¬"s chapters deal with a range of theoretical problems discussed in classic compatibilist literature '¬ ; e.g. the relationship between ...
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  20. Compensation for Mere Exposure to Risk.Nicole A. Vincent - 2005 - Australian Journal of Legal Philosophy 29:89-101.
    It could be argued that tort law is failing, and arguably an example of this failure is the recent public liability and insurance (‘PL&I’) crisis. A number of solutions have been proposed, but ultimately the chosen solution should address whatever we take to be the cause of this failure. On one account, the PL&I crisis is a result of an unwarranted expansion of the scope of tort law. Proponents of this position sometimes argue that the duty of care owed by (...)
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  21. What is at Stake in Taking Responsibility? Lessons From Third-Party Property Insurance.Nicole A. Vincent - 2001 - [Journal (Paginated)] (in Press) 20 (1):75-94.
    Third-party property insurance (TPPI) protects insured drivers who accidentally damage an expensive car from the threat of financial ruin. Perhaps more importantly though, TPPI also protects the victims whose losses might otherwise go uncompensated. Ought responsible drivers therefore take out TPPI? This paper begins by enumerating some reasons for why a rational person might believe that they have a moral obligation to take out TPPI. It will be argued that if what is at stake in taking responsibility is the ability (...)
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  22. Legal Responsibility and Neuroscience.Nicole A. Vincent (ed.) - 2013 - Oxford University Press.
  23.  22
    Improving Coordination of Legal-Based Efforts Across Jurisdictions and Sectors for Obesity Prevention and Control.Aviva Must, Gary Bennett, Christina Economos, Elizabeth Goodman, Joe Schilling, Lisa Quintiliani, Sara Rosenbaum, Jeff Vincent & Marice Ashe - 2009 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 37 (s1):90-98.
  24.  82
    “The Neuroscience of Responsibility”—Workshop Report.Nicole A. Vincent, Pim Haselager & Gert-Jan Lokhorst - 2011 - Neuroethics 4 (2):175-178.
    This is a report on the 3-day workshop “The Neuroscience of Responsibility” that was held in the Philosophy Department at Delft University of Technology in The Netherlands during February 11th–13th, 2010. The workshop had 25 participants from The Netherlands, Germany, Italy, UK, USA, Canada and Australia, with expertise in philosophy, neuroscience, psychology, psychiatry and law. Its aim was to identify current trends in neurolaw research related specifically to the topic of responsibility, and to foster international collaborative research on this topic. (...)
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  25. Philosophy, Politics and Citizenship: The Life and Thought of the British Idealists.Andrew Vincent - 1984 - Blackwell.
  26.  34
    The Development of Moral Reasoning and the Foundations of Geometry.John Macnamara - 1991 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 21 (2):125–150.
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  27.  49
    Understanding Induction.John Macnamara - 1991 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 42 (1):21-48.
    The paper offers a new understanding of induction in the empirical sciences, one which assimilates it to induction in geometry rather than to statistical inference. To make the point a system of notions, essential to logically sound induction, is defined. Notable among them are arbitrary object and particular property. A second aim of the paper is to bring to light a largely neglected set of assumptions shared by both induction and deduction in the empirical sciences. This is made possible by (...)
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  28.  37
    Can Groups Be Persons?Andrew Vincent - 1989 - Review of Metaphysics 42 (4):687-715.
    I ARGUE IN THIS PAPER that there are profound and legitimate worries concerning the application of organic and personal criteria to groups. I try to specify the reasons why we object to such ideas, while contending that some of these objections are misguided. Primarily, to refer to a group as a person is not necessarily the same as referring to it as either organic or as an individual. Further, each term--organic, individual, and person--must be carefully unpacked and analyzed. One conclusion (...)
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  29.  72
    Nationalism and the Open Society.Andrew Vincent - 2005 - Theoria 44 (107):36-64.
    Nationalism has had a complex relation with the discipline of political theory during the 20th century. Political theory has often been deeply uneasy with nationalism in relation to its role in the events leading up to and during the Second World War. Many theorists saw nationalism as an overly narrow and potentially irrationalist doctrine. In essence it embodied a closed vision of the world. This article focuses on one key contributor to the immediate post-war debate—Karl Popper—who retained deep misgivings about (...)
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  30.  69
    British Society of Aesthetics.P. Vincent & Pat Statham - 1967 - British Journal of Aesthetics 7 (3):307-307.
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  31.  63
    Hyperstructures, Genome Analysis and I-Cells.Patrick Amar, Pascal Ballet, Georgia Barlovatz-Meimon, Arndt Benecke, Gilles Bernot, Yves Bouligand, Paul Bourguine, Franck Delaplace, Jean-Marc Delosme, Maurice Demarty, Itzhak Fishov, Jean Fourmentin-Guilbert, Joe Fralick, Jean-Louis Giavitto, Bernard Gleyse, Christophe Godin, Roberto Incitti, François Képès, Catherine Lange, Lois Le Sceller, Corinne Loutellier, Olivier Michel, Franck Molina, Chantal Monnier, René Natowicz, Vic Norris, Nicole Orange, Helene Pollard, Derek Raine, Camille Ripoll, Josette Rouviere-Yaniv, Milton Saier, Paul Soler, Pierre Tambourin, Michel Thellier, Philippe Tracqui, Dave Ussery, Jean-Claude Vincent, Jean-Pierre Vannier, Philippa Wiggins & Abdallah Zemirline - 2002 - Acta Biotheoretica 50 (4):357-373.
    New concepts may prove necessary to profit from the avalanche of sequence data on the genome, transcriptome, proteome and interactome and to relate this information to cell physiology. Here, we focus on the concept of large activity-based structures, or hyperstructures, in which a variety of types of molecules are brought together to perform a function. We review the evidence for the existence of hyperstructures responsible for the initiation of DNA replication, the sequestration of newly replicated origins of replication, cell division (...)
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  32.  22
    Functoriality and Grammatical Role in Syllogisms.Marie La Palme Reyes, John Macnamara & Gonzalo E. Reyes - 1994 - Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 35 (1):41-66.
    We specify two problems in syllogistic: the lack of functoriality of predicates (although a thief is a person, a good thief may not be a good person) and the change of grammatical role of the middle term, from subject to predicate, in some syllogisms. The standard semantics, the class interpretation, by-passes these difficulties but, we argue, in a manner that is at odds with logical intuition. We propose a semantics that is category theoretic to handle these difficulties. With this semantics (...)
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  33.  32
    Corroboration and Probability.R. H. Vincent - 1963 - Dialogue 2 (2):194-205.
  34.  31
    Concerning an Alleged Contradiction.R. H. Vincent - 1963 - Philosophy of Science 30 (2):189-194.
  35.  59
    The British Society of Aesthetics.Vida Carver & P. Vincent - 1964 - British Journal of Aesthetics 4 (2):135-135.
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  36.  66
    Philip Pettit, The Common Mind: An Essay on Psychology, Society, and Politics, Oxford, Oxford University Press, 1993, Pp. Xiv + 365.Andrew Vincent - 1994 - Utilitas 6 (2):319.
  37.  38
    Development and Self-Identity: Hegel's Concept of Education.A. W. Vincent & Michael George - 1982 - Educational Theory 32 (3-4):131-141.
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  38.  38
    Divine Immanence and Transcendence: Henry Jones and the Philosophy of Religion.Andrew Vincent - 1993 - Idealistic Studies 23 (2/3):161-177.
    In the last four decades there has been a great deal of work done on German idealism in all fields of humanistic study, including theology and the philosophy of religion, devoted particularly to the philosophies of Kant and Hegel. A great deal less has been done of the British idealist school, often because they are regarded as slavish imitators of Kant or Hegel. Such a judgment is though misplaced. There is a rich and independent vein of idealist philosophical and theological (...)
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  39.  23
    The Individual In Hegelian Thought.Andrew Vincent - 1982 - Idealistic Studies 12 (2):156-168.
    This paper is concerned with the conception of the individual in Hegelian thought. The discussion will focus on some of the textual uses that Hegel and some Hegelians make of the term individual. The ultimate aim of the paper, however, is to focus on the concrete individual and to argue that there are two fundamentally important yet distinct uses to which Hegel and some Hegelians put the term. These two uses are not compatible, dialectically or otherwise. The plan of this (...)
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  40.  47
    Nanotechnology and Society.Bernadette Bensaude Vincent - 2009 - Techne 13 (1):69-70.
  41.  33
    Selective Confirmation and the Ravens.R. H. Vincent - 1975 - Dialogue 14 (1):3-49.
  42.  32
    Mr. Bradley and God.Andrew Vincent - 2000 - Bradley Studies 6 (1):104-124.
    What did God mean to F.H. Bradley? Bradley’s style and subtle philosophical approach makes it difficult to ascertain precisely what his settled thoughts were on this issue. He does say, for example, quite a lot as to what God is not. This essay will initially follow out this negative reading. This latter enterprise entails comparisons, first, with philosophy, or more appropriately the ‘metaphysical impulse’, second, with morality, and third, with history. Having followed out the more negative arguments, the essay turns (...)
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  43.  28
    Reflexions Sur l'Usage, En Biologie, de la Theorie de L'Information.Louis-Marie Vincent - 1994 - Acta Biotheoretica 42 (2-3):167-179.
    For living beings, information is as fundamental as matter or energy. In this paper we show: a) inadequacies of quantitative theories of information, b) how a qualitative analysis leads to a classification of information systems and to a modelling of intercellular communication.From a quantitative point of view, the application in biology of information theories borrowed from communication techniques proved to be disappointing. These theories ignore deliberately the significance of messages, and do not give any definition of information. They refer to (...)
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  44. The Mind-Body Problem and Contemporary Psychology.John Macnamara - 1994 - In The Mind-Body Problem: A Guide to the Current Debate. Cambridge: Blackwell.
     
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  45.  21
    The Problem of the Unexamined Individual.R. H. Vincent - 1964 - Mind 73 (292):550-556.
    No categories
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  46.  50
    The Non-Boolean Logic of Natural Language Negation.Marie la Palme Reyes, John Macnamara, Gonzalo E. Reyes & And Houman Zolfaghari - 1994 - Philosophia Mathematica 2 (1):45-68.
    Since antiquity two different negations in natural languages have been noted: predicate negation (not honest) and predicate term negation (dishonest). The extensive literature offers no models. We propose category-theoretic models with two distinct negation operators, neither of them in general Boolean. We study combinations of the two (not dishonest) and sentential counterparts of each. We emphasize the relevance of our work for the theory of cognition.
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  47.  22
    A Note on Some Quantitative Theories of Confirmation.R. H. Vincent - 1961 - Philosophical Studies 12 (6):91 - 92.
  48.  21
    The Challenge of Humanism.Sister Mary Vincent - 1934 - New Scholasticism 8 (2):161-163.
  49.  39
    Logical Foundations of Probability. By Rudolf Carnap. Second Edition, 1962. The University of Chicago Press. Pp. Xxii and 613. $10.00. [REVIEW]R. H. Vincent - 1963 - Dialogue 2 (1):97-101.
  50.  36
    Visual Humour (J.R.) Clarke Looking at Laughter. Humor, Power, and Transgression in Roman Visual Culture, 100 B.C.–A.D. 250. Pp. Xii + 322, Ills, Colour Pls. Berkeley, Los Angeles and London: University of California Press, 2007. Cased, US$32.95. ISBN: 978-0-520-23733-. [REVIEW]Heather Vincent - 2009 - The Classical Review 59 (1):257-.
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