Results for 'Edward Omar Moad'

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  1. A Significant Difference Between Al-Ghazālī and Hume on Causation.Edward Omar Moad - 2008 - Journal of Islamic Philosophy 3:22-39.
  2. A Path to the Oasis: Sharī‘Ah and Reason in Islamic Moral Epistemology.Edward Omar Moad - 2007 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 62 (3):135 - 148.
    I propose a framework for comparative Islamic—Western ethics in which the Islamic categories "Islam, Iman," and "Ihsan" are juxtaposed with the concepts of obligation, value, and virtue, respectively. I argue that "shari'a" refers to both the obligation component and the entire structure of the Islamic ethic; suggesting a suspension of the understanding of "shari'a" as simply Islamic "law," and an alternative understanding of "usul al-fiqh" as a moral epistemology of obligation. I will test this approach by addressing the question of (...)
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  3.  12
    A Significant Difference Between Al-Ghazālī and Hume on Causation.Edward Omar Moad - 2008 - Journal of Islamic Philosophy 3:22-39.
  4.  15
    A Path to the Oasis: Sharī‘Ah and Reason in Islamic Moral Epistemology.Edward Omar Moad - 2007 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 62 (3):135-148.
    I propose a framework for comparative Islamic—Western ethics in which the Islamic categories "Islam, Iman," and "Ihsan" are juxtaposed with the concepts of obligation, value, and virtue, respectively. I argue that "shari'a" refers to both the obligation component and the entire structure of the Islamic ethic; suggesting a suspension of the understanding of "shari'a" as simply Islamic "law," and an alternative understanding of "usul al-fiqh" as a moral epistemology of obligation. I will test this approach by addressing the question of (...)
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  5. Al-Ghazali on Power, Causation, and 'Acquisition'.Edward Omar Moad - 2007 - Philosophy East and West 57 (1):1-13.
    : Al-Ghazali on Power, Causation, and 'Acquisition' Edward Omar Moad In Al-Iqtişādfial-I'tiqād (Moderation in belief ), at the end of his chapter on divine power, Abu Hamid al-Ghazali writes, "No created thing comes about through another [created thing]. Rather, all come about through [divine] power." A precise understanding of what al-Ghazali means by this statement requires an understanding of his conception of power. Here, we will articulate this conception of power and show how it renders a distinctive (...)
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  6.  62
    Al-Ghazali’s Reflections on the Metaphysics of Metaphor in the Mishkāt Al-Anwar.Edward Omar Moad - 2007 - Sophia 46 (2):163-175.
    Mythological language is sometimes understood as a way of representing, by concrete imagery, more abstract notions. In this paper, we will pose some metaphysical questions about the possibility of such a representation. These questions will serve to motivate a brief tour of Mishkāt al-Anwār (Niche of Lights)—Abu Hamid al-Ghazali’s commentary on the famous ayat al-nur (“verse of light”) of the Qur’an—wherein is discussed, among other things, how symbolic imagery is possible, and “the respect in which the spirits of the meanings (...)
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  7. Prolegomena to an Occasionalist Metaphysics.Edward Omar Moad - 2004 - Dissertation, University of Missouri - Columbia
    It is a fundamental doctrine of the Abrahamic religions, following from the belief in God as the creator, that He is the primary cause of all natural phenomena. Some, however, have gone further, to claim that God is the only cause. Consequently, there are no genuine created, or secondary, causes. The western tradition has coined the term 'occasionalism' for this doctrine, according to which all apparent instances of secondary causation are just that---instances of merely apparent, or occasional, causation. The idea (...)
     
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  8. Comparing Phases of Skepticism in Al-Ghazālī and Descartes: Some First Meditations on Deliverance From Error.Omar Edward Moad - 2009 - Philosophy East and West 59 (1):pp. 88-101.
    Abū Hāmid al-Ghazālī (1058–1111 c.e .) is well known, among other things, for his account, in al-Munqidh min al-ḍalāl (Deliverance from error), of a struggle with philosophical skepticism that bears a striking resemblance to that described by Descartes in the Meditations . This essay aims to give a close comparative analysis of these respective accounts, and will concentrate solely on the processes of invoking or entertaining doubt that al-Ghazālī and Descartes describe, respectively. In the process some subtle differences between them (...)
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  9.  13
    Al-Ghazali’s Occasionalism and the Natures of Creatures.Omar Edward Moad - 2005 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 58 (2):95-101.
  10. Al-Ghazali’s Occasionalism and the Natures of Creatures.Omar Edward Moad - 2005 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 58 (2):95 - 101.
    Occasionalism is the doctrine that God is the sole immediate cause of all events, to the exclusion of any causal participation on the part of creatures. While this doctrine clearly has interesting implications with regard to causation and the philosophy of natural science, few have noticed that it also seems to entail, not only that creatures have no causal power whatsoever, but that they are completely devoid of intrinsic natures, conceived as intrinsic dispositional properties. In this paper, I will outline (...)
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  11.  75
    Reasons, Resultance and Moral Particularism.Moad Omar Edward - 2007 - Philosophical Quarterly 57 (226):112-116.
    According to Jonathan Dancy's moral particularism, the way in which a given moral reason functions as a reason for or against an action can vary from case to case. Dancy also asserts that reasons are resultance bases. But a reason why something ought to be done is that in virtue of which it is something that ought to be done. If the function of a reason can vary, then resultance bases cannot be reasons. Perhaps the particularist might conceive a reason (...)
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  12. The Jinn and the Shayatin.Edward Moad - 2017 - In Benjamin McCraw & Robert Arp (eds.), Philosophical Approaches to Demonology. New York, NY, USA: pp. 137-155.
    If by “demon” one understands an evil occult being, then its equivalent in the Islamic narrative is the intersection of the category jinn with that of the shayātīn: a demon is a shaytān from among the jinn. The literature in the Islamic tradition on these subjects is vast. In what follows, we will select some key elements from it to provide a brief summary: first on the nature of the jinn, their nature, and their relationship to God and human beings; (...)
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  13.  10
    Behind the Good, the Bad, and the Obligatory in Al-Ghazālī’s Al-Mustaṣfā Min Al-Uṣūl.Omar Moad - 2012 - Journal of Islamic Philosophy 8:79-93.
  14.  21
    General Principles and Moral Judgment.Omar Moad - 2002 - Southwest Philosophy Review 18 (2):45-53.
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  15.  71
    Actualism and the Distinction of Truth Over Truth in a World.Edward Moad - 2008 - Sorites 20:43-48.
    Robert Adams characterizes actualism regarding possible worlds as «the view that if there are any true statements in which there are said to be nonactual possible worlds, they must be reducible to statements in which the only things there are said to be are things which there are in the actual world, and which are not identical with nonactual possibles.» In this paper, I will briefly explain actualism about possible worlds, showing that an essential pillar of the theory is the (...)
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  16.  59
    Al-Ghazali’s Position on the ‘Second Proof’ of the ‘Philosophers’ for the Eternity of the World, in the First Discussion of the Incoherence of the Philosophers.Edward Moad - 2015 - Sophia 54 (4):429-441.
    In the Incoherence of the Philosophers, Abu Hamid al-Ghazali raised objections against the doctrine of the ‘philosophers’ on 20 specific points. In the first, and longest discussion, he examines and rebuts four of their proofs of the pre-eternity of the world—that is, that the universe as a whole had no beginning but extends perpetually into the past. Al-Ghazali rejects that doctrine. But his own position on the issue does not become clear until he discusses the philosophers’ ‘second proof.’ In this (...)
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  17.  43
    Between Divine Simplicity and the Eternity of the World.Edward R. Moad - 2015 - Philosophy and Theology 27 (1):55-73.
    In the Incoherence of the Philosophers, Abu Hamid al-Ghazali leveled a critique against twenty propositions of the Muslim peripatetic philosophers, represented chiefly by al-Farabi and Ibn Sina. In the Fourth Discussion of this work, he rejects their claim to having proven the existence of God. The proof to which he objects is none other than the famous ‘argument from contingency.’ So why did the eminent theologian of Islamic orthodoxy reject an argument for God’s existence that ultimately became so historically influential? (...)
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  18.  85
    Can Minimalism Account for the Value of Truth?Edward Moad - 2008 - Disputatio 2 (24):1 - 9.
    Michael Dummett, in ‘Truth,’ mounted an objection to the redundancy theory of truth on the grounds that it neglects to account for the normative features he claimed are part of the concept of truth. Paul Horwich, in ‘The Minimalist Conception of Truth’, notes that the same objection could be leveled against minimalism. He defends minimalism against Dummett’s objection by offering a sketch of an instrumental account of the desirability of truth that is compatible with the minimalist thesis. In this paper, (...)
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  19.  67
    Divine Conservation, Concurrence, and Occasionalism.Edward Ryan Moad - 2018 - International Philosophical Quarterly 58 (2):209-225.
    Occasionalism is the doctrine that relegates all real causal efficacy exclusively to God. This paper will aim to elucidate in some detail the metaphysical considerations that, together with certain common medieval theological axioms, constitute the philosophical steps leading to this doctrine. First, I will explain how the doctrine of divine conservation implies that we should attribute to divine power causal immediacy in every natural event and that it rules out mere conservationism as a model of the causal relation between God (...)
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  20. Hindu Ethics on the Moral Question of Abortion.Edward Moad - 2004 - Eubios Journal of Asian and International Bioethics 14 (4):149-150.
     
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  21.  97
    Ibn Khaldun and Occasionalism.Edward Moad - 2017 - In Nazif Muhtaroglu (ed.), Occasionalism Revisited. Abu Dhabi - United Arab Emirates: pp. 61-82.
    Ibn Khaldun (1332-1406) is said to be the first scholar to make history and society the direct objects of a systematic science. This paper will examine the role of occasionalism in his thought. This question is interesting because a perennial objection to occasionalism has been that it denies any real natural order, and therefore precludes the possibility of any systematic natural science. If Ibn Khaldun was an occasionalist, then it would mean that one of the earliest pioneers in attempting to (...)
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  22.  25
    Modernity, Civilization and the Return to History By Anthony F. Shaker. [REVIEW]Edward Moad - 2019 - Journal of Islamic Studies 30 (1):105-107.
    Modernity, Civilization and the Return to History By ShakerAnthony F., 575 pp. Price HB £80.00. EAN 978–1622731848.
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  23.  32
    Moral Dilemmas.Edward Moad - 2013 - In Vibha Chaturvedi & Pragati Sahni (eds.), Understanding Ethics. New Delhi, Delhi, India: pp. 304-314.
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  24.  32
    Mulla Sadra by Ibrahim Kalin. [REVIEW]Edward Moad - 2018 - Philosophy East and West 68 (2):1-3.
    This introduction to the life and thought of Muhammad ibn Ibrahim ibn Yahya Qawami al-Shirazi, is part of the Makers of Islamic Civilization series, conceived by the Oxford Centre for Islamic studies, edited by Farhan Nizami, and published by Oxford University Press. The self-described aim of the series is to provide a set of introductory texts on outstanding figures in the history of Islamic civilization. This volume represents an important contribution to the literature on a neglected period of Islamic philosophy, (...)
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  25.  27
    Occasionalism and Contemporary Analyses of Causation.Edward Moad - 2018 - Philosophy and Theology 30 (2):361-381.
    This paper will survey the most prominent contemporary analyses of causation, and evaluate their compatibility, or otherwise, with the doctrine of Occasionalism, with the ultimate aim of formulating an occasionalist analysis of causation. Though reductive analyses of causation are incompatible with Occasionalism, it seems that the denial of reductionism is as well. I will suggest a solution to the problem, involving an analysis of causation as the relation of extensional identity, between God’s will that an event actually occur, and the (...)
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  26. Problem's with Aquinas' Third Way.Edward Moad - 2016 - In Robert Arp (ed.), Revisiting Aquinas' Proofs for the Existence of God. Leiden, Netherlands: Brill. pp. 131-140.
    The object of this paper is not arguments from contingency in general, but specifically Aquinas’s ‘Third Way’ as it appears in his Summa Theologica. I will raise three objections to this argument. First, the argument depends on the premise, that if everything were contingent, then there would have been a time during which nothing exists, but this is not self-evident and no argument is given for it here. Secondly, Aquinas tells us that a key premise in this argument, that an (...)
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  27.  18
    The Day Begins at Sunset: Perceptions of Time in the Islamic World by Barbara Freyer Stowasser. [REVIEW]Edward Moad - 2015 - Journal of Islamic Studies 26 (3):385-387.
  28.  5
    The Qurʾan and the Just Society.Edward Moad - forthcoming - Journal of Islamic Studies.
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    The Qurʾan and the Just Society By Ramon Harvey. Foreword by M. A. S. Abdel Haleem.Edward Moad - 2020 - Journal of Islamic Studies 31 (1):103-108.
    The Qurʾan and the Just Society By HarveyRamon. Foreword by Abdel HaleemM. A. S., x + 276 pp. Price HB £80.00. EAN 978–1474403290.
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  30.  21
    Universalizability and the Metaphysics of Moral Particularism, Specified.Edward Moad - 2018 - Philosophical Forum 49 (3):309-324.
  31. Astorga, Omar, La institución imaginaria del 'Leviathan': Hobbes como intérprete de la política moderna, Caracas, Universidad Central de Venezuela: Consejo de Desarrollo Científico y Humanístico, 2000. Curran, Eleanor, Reclaiming the Rights of the Hobbesian Subject, New York/Basingstoke, Palgrave/Macmillan, 2007. [REVIEW]Omar Astorga - 2008 - Hobbes Studies 21 (1):104.
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  32.  43
    Selected Writings of Edward Sapir in Language, Culture and Personality.Edward Sapir & David Goodman Mandelbaum - 1949 - University of California Press Cambridge University Press.
  33.  20
    Ordering and Independence: Edward F. McClennen.Edward F. McClennen - 1988 - Economics and Philosophy 4 (2):298-308.
  34.  51
    Constrained Maximization and Resolute Choice*: EDWARD F. McCLENNEN.Edward F. McClennen - 1988 - Social Philosophy and Policy 5 (2):95-118.
    In Morals By Agreement, David Gauthier concludes that under certain conditions it is rational for an agent to be disposed to choose in accordance with a fair cooperative scheme rather than to choose the course of action that maximizes his utility. This is only one of a number of important claims advanced in that book. In particular, he also propounds a distinctive view concerning what counts as a fair cooperative arrangement. The thesis concerning the rationality of adopting a cooperative disposition (...)
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  35.  63
    The Cognitive Origins of Bourdieu's Habitus.Omar Lizardo - 2004 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 34 (4):375–401.
    This paper aims to balance the conceptual reception of Bourdieu's sociology in the United States through a conceptual re-examination of the concept of Habitus. I retrace the intellectual lineage of the Habitus idea, showing it to have roots in Claude Levi-Strauss structural anthropology and in the developmental psychology of Jean Piaget, especially the latter's generalization of the idea of operations from mathematics to the study of practical, bodily-mediated cognition. One important payoff of this exercise is that the common misinterpretation of (...)
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  36.  6
    Interview: Edward W. Said.Edward W. Said - 1976 - Diacritics 6 (3):30.
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  37.  57
    Consilience: The Unity of Knowledge.Edward O. Wilson - 1998 - Random House.
    An enormous intellectual adventure. In this groundbreaking new book, the American biologist Edward O. Wilson, considered to be one of the world's greatest living scientists, argues for the fundamental unity of all knowledge and the need to search for consilience --the proof that everything in our world is organized in terms of a small number of fundamental natural laws that comprise the principles underlying every branch of learning. Professor Wilson, the pioneer of sociobiology and biodiversity, now once again breaks (...)
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  38.  14
    What Are Dual Process Models? Implications for Cultural Analysis in Sociology.Omar Lizardo, Robert Mowry, Brandon Sepulvado, Dustin S. Stoltz, Marshall A. Taylor, Justin Van Ness & Michael Wood - 2016 - Sociological Theory 34 (4):287-310.
    In this paper we introduce the idea of the dual process framework (DPF), an interdisciplinary approach to the study of learning, memory, thinking, and action. Departing from the successful reception of Vaisey (2009), we suggest that intradisciplinary debates in sociology regarding the merits of “dual process” formulations can benefit from a better understanding of the theoretical foundations of these models in cognitive and social psychology. We argue that the key is to distinguish the general DPF from more specific applications to (...)
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  39.  36
    Butler, Fanaticism and Conscience: Edward W. James.Edward W. James - 1981 - Philosophy 56 (218):517-532.
    Butler refused to be satisfied with just one leading principle, or rational basis for human action, but in the end settled for three: self-love, to provide for our ‘own private good’; benevolence, to consider ‘the good of our fellow creatures’ ; and conscience, ‘to preside and govern’ over our lives as a whole . By so doing he hoped to ensure a completeness to our ethical scheme, so that nothing would be omitted from our moral deliberations. Yet by so doing (...)
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  40.  10
    Islamic Perspectives on Clinical Intervention Near the End-of-Life: We Can but Must We?Aasim I. Padela & Omar Qureshi - 2017 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 20 (4):545-559.
    The ever-increasing technological advances of modern medicine have increased physicians’ capacity to carry out a wide array of clinical interventions near the end-of-life. These new procedures have resulted in new “types” of living where a patient’s cognitive functions are severely diminished although many physiological functions remain active. In this biomedical context, patients, surrogate decision-makers, and clinicians all struggle with decisions about what clinical interventions to pursue and when therapeutic intent should be replaced with palliative goals of care. For some patients (...)
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  41.  68
    Beyond the Antinomies of Structure: Levi-Strauss, Giddens, Bourdieu, and Sewell. [REVIEW]Omar Lizardo - 2010 - Theory and Society 39 (6):651-688.
  42.  70
    "Mirror Neurons," Collective Objects and the Problem of Transmission: Reconsidering Stephen Turner's Critique of Practice Theory.Omar Lizardo - 2007 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 37 (3):319–350.
    In this paper, I critically examine Stephen Turner's critique of practice theory in light of recent neurophysiological discoveries regarding the “mirror neuron system” in the pre-frontal mo-tor cortex of humans and other primates. I argue that two of Turner's strongest objections against the sociological version of the practice-theoretical account, the problem of transmission and the problem of sameness, are substantially undermined when examined from the perspective of re-cently systematized accounts of embodied learning and intersubjective action understanding in-spired by these developments. (...)
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  43.  18
    The Hysteresis Effect: Theorizing Mismatch in Action.Michael Strand & Omar Lizardo - 2017 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 47 (2):164-194.
    Widespread reliance on representationalist understandings commit social scientists to either partially or totally decouple belief from reality, limiting the domain of phenomena that can be treated by belief as an analytic concept. Developing the contrastive notion of practical belief, we introduce the hysteresis effect as a situational phenomenon involving the systematic production of agent-environment mismatches and argue for its placement as a central problem for the theory of action. Revealing the dynamic, embodied conservation of belief in the temporality of practice, (...)
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  44.  15
    An Ethical (Descriptive) Framework for Judgment of Actions and Decisions in the Construction Industry and Engineering–Part I.Omar J. Alkhatib & Alaa Abdou - 2018 - Science and Engineering Ethics 24 (2):585-606.
    The construction industry is usually characterized as a fragmented system of multiple-organizational entities in which members from different technical backgrounds and moral values join together to develop a particular business or project. The greatest challenge in the construction process for the achievement of a successful practice is the development of an outstanding reputation, which is built on identifying and applying an ethical framework. This framework should reflect a common ethical ground for myriad people involved in this process to survive and (...)
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  45.  20
    The Hysteresis Effect: Theorizing Mismatch in Action.Michael Strand & Omar Lizardo - 2016 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 46 (4).
    Widespread reliance on representationalist understandings commit social scientists to either partially or totally decouple belief from reality, limiting the domain of phenomena that can be treated by belief as an analytic concept. Developing the contrastive notion of practical belief, we introduce the hysteresis effect as a situational phenomenon involving the systematic production of agent-environment mismatches and argue for its placement as a central problem for the theory of action. Revealing the dynamic, embodied conservation of belief in the temporality of practice, (...)
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  46.  20
    When Must a Patient Seek Healthcare? Bringing the Perspectives of Islamic Jurists and Clinicians Into Dialogue.Omar Qureshi & Aasim I. Padela - 2016 - Zygon 51 (3):592-625.
    Muslim physicians and Islamic jurists analyze the moral dimensions of biomedicine using different tools and processes. While the deliberations of these two classes of experts involve judgments about the deliverables of the other's respective fields, Islamic jurists and Muslim physicians rarely engage in discussions about the constructs and epistemic frameworks that motivate their analyses. The lack of dialogue creates gaps in knowledge and leads to imprecise guidance. In order to address these discursive and conceptual gaps we describe the sources of (...)
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  47.  64
    Re‐Conceptualizing Abstract Conceptualization in Social Theory: The Case of the “Structure” Concept.Omar Lizardo - 2013 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 43 (2):155-180.
    I this paper, I draw on recent research on the radically embodied and perceptual bases of conceptualization in linguistics and cognitive science to develop a new way of reading and evaluating abstract concepts in social theory. I call this approach Sociological Idea Analysis. I argue that, in contrast to the traditional view of abstract concepts, which conceives them as amodal “presuppositions” removed from experience, abstract concepts are irreducibly grounded in experience and partake of non-negotiable perceptual-symbolic features from which a non-propositional (...)
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  48.  30
    Multiculturalism and International Law: Essays in Honour of Edward Mcwhinney.Edward McWhinney, Sienho Yee & Jacques-Yvan Morin (eds.) - 2009 - Martinus Nijhoff Publishers.
    This volume examines the role and influence of multiculturalism in general theories of international law; in the composition and functioning of international ...
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  49.  12
    Achieving Top Performance While Building Collegiality in Sales: It All Starts with Ethics.Omar S. Itani, Fernando Jaramillo & Larry Chonko - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 156 (2):417-438.
    While previous literature provides evidence of the positive relationship between ethical climate and job satisfaction, the possible mechanisms of this relationship are still underexplored. This study aims to enhance scholars’ and practitioners’ understanding of the ethical climate–job satisfaction relationship by identifying and testing two of the possible mechanisms. More specifically, this study fills an existing research gap by examining social and interpersonal mechanisms, referred to in this study as workplace isolation of colleagues and salesperson’s teamwork, of the ethical climate–job satisfaction (...)
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  50.  99
    Brain Death and its Entanglements.Omar Sultan Haque - 2008 - Journal of Religious Ethics 36 (1):13-36.
    The Islamic philosophical, mystical, and theological sub-traditions have each made characteristic assumptions about the human person, including an incorporation of substance dualism in distinctive manners. Advances in the brain sciences of the last half century, which include a widespread acceptance of death as the end of essential brain function, require the abandonment of dualistic notions of the human person that assert an immaterial and incorporeal soul separate from a body. In this article, I trace classical Islamic notions of death and (...)
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