Results for 'Stephen Watt'

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  1.  71
    Do the Eyes Have It? Cues to the Direction of Social Attention.Stephen R. H. Langton, Roger J. Watt & Vicki Bruce - 2000 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 4 (2):50-59.
  2.  9
    A Theory of Virtue – Robert Merrihew Adams.Stephen Watt - 2009 - Philosophical Quarterly 59 (234):184-186.
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  3.  18
    Collegial Propositions.Stephen Watt - 2005 - Symploke 13 (1):18-29.
  4.  11
    Notes on a "Classic".Stephen Watt - 2004 - Symploke 12 (1):265-268.
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  5.  24
    Philosophy and Power in the Graeco-Roman World.Stephen Watt - 2004 - International Philosophical Quarterly 44 (1):124-126.
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  6. Postmodern/Drama Reading the Contemporary Stage.Stephen Watt - 1998
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  7.  6
    Review of John Kekes, The Art of Life[REVIEW]Stephen Watt - 2003 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2003 (6).
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  8.  50
    I–Stephen Yablo.Stephen Yablo - 1998 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 72 (1):229-261.
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  9.  66
    Confusion of Tongues: A Theory of Normative Language By Stephen Finlay.Stephen Finlay - 2020 - Analysis 80 (1):99-101.
    This is a short precis of my 2014 book Confusion of Tongues: A Theory of Normative Language, accompanying my Reply to Worsnip, Dowell, and Koehn in the same volume.
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  10. Rules of Life; with Reflections on the Manners and Dispositions of Mankind [by R. Watt].Robert Watt - 1814
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  11. Wrong Signals: When is a Red Signal Red?: An Interview with Roger Watt.Roger Watt - 2002 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 6 (6):267-268.
  12.  54
    Does Ontology Rest on a Mistake?: Stephen Yablo.Stephen Yablo - 1998 - Supplement to the Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 72 (1):229-262.
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  13.  36
    The Function of Dynamic Grouping in Vision.Roger J. Watt & William A. Phillips - 2000 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 4 (12):447-454.
  14.  8
    Neural Substrates of Consciousness: Implications for Clinical Psychiatry.Douglas F. Watt & David I. Pincus - 2004 - In Jaak Panksepp (ed.), Textbook of Biological Psychiatry. Wiley-Liss. pp. 75-110.
  15. Hart's Methodological Positivism: Stephen R. Perry.Stephen R. Perry - 1998 - Legal Theory 4 (4):427-467.
    To understand H.L.A. Hart's general theory of law, it is helpful to distinguish between substantive and methodological legal positivism. Substantive legal positivism is the view that there is no necessary connection between morality and the content of law. Methodological legal positivism is the view that legal theory can and should offer a normatively neutral description of a particular social phenomenon, namely law. Methodological positivism holds, we might say, not that there is no necessary connection between morality and law, but rather (...)
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  16.  69
    Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis: Choosing the “Good Enough” Child. [REVIEW]Helen Watt - 2004 - Health Care Analysis 12 (1):51-60.
    Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) raises serious moral questions concerning the parent-child relationship. Good parents accept their children unconditionally: they do not reject/attack them because they do not have the features they want. There is nothing wrong with treating a child as someone who can help promote some other worthwhile end, providing the child is also respected as an end in him or herself. However, if the child's presence is not valued in itself, regardless of any further benefits it brings, the (...)
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  17.  38
    Gender Transition: The Moral Meaning of Bodily and Social Presentation.Helen Watt - 2020 - New Blackfriars 101 (1094):456-477.
    Medical and/or social gender transition need not involve denial of one's biological sex, but raises other taxing ethical issues. These range from sexual ethics issues narrowly understood to consideration of the claims of any spouse or children and indeed, of gender‐discordant younger people who may follow one's example. As with intersex conditions, not all crossdressing or use of cross‐sex hormones is excluded absolutely. Detransition, for example, could be rightly deferred for various reasons. However, as illustrated by the analogy of an (...)
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  18.  39
    Embryos and Pseudoembryos: Parthenotes, Reprogrammed Oocytes and Headless Clones.H. Watt - 2007 - Journal of Medical Ethics 33 (9):554-556.
    What makes something an embryo—as opposed to what is actually, and not just in biotech parlance, a collection of cells? This question has come to the fore in recent years with proposals for producing embryonic stem cells for research. While some of those opposed to use of standard embryonic stem cells emphasise that adult cells have a clinical track record, others argue that there may be further benefits obtainable from cells very like those of embryos, provided such cells can be (...)
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  19.  45
    Treating Patients as Persons: A Capabilities Approach to Support Delivery of Person-Centered Care.Vikki A. Entwistle & Ian S. Watt - 2013 - American Journal of Bioethics 13 (8):29-39.
    Health services internationally struggle to ensure health care is ?person-centered? (or similar). In part, this is because there are many interpretations of ?person-centered care? (and near synonyms), some of which seem unrealistic for some patients or situations and obscure the intrinsic value of patients? experiences of health care delivery. The general concern behind calls for person-centered care is an ethical one: Patients should be ?treated as persons.? We made novel use of insights from the capabilities approach to characterize person-centered care (...)
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  20.  45
    Causal Mechanisms of Evolution and the Capacity for Niche Construction.Ward B. Watt - 2013 - Biology and Philosophy 28 (5):757-766.
    Ernst Mayr proposed a distinction between “proximate”, mechanistic, and “ultimate”, evolutionary, causes of biological phenomena. This dichotomy has influenced the thinking of many biologists, but it is increasingly perceived as impeding modern studies of evolutionary processes, including study of “niche construction” in which organisms alter their environments in ways supportive of their evolutionary success. Some still find value for this dichotomy in its separation of answers to “how?” versus “why?”questions about evolution. But “why is A?” questions about evolution necessarily take (...)
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  21. An Uneasy Case Against Property Rights in Body Parts*: STEPHEN R. MUNZER.Stephen R. Munzer - 1994 - Social Philosophy and Policy 11 (2):259-286.
    This essay deals with property rights in body parts that can be exchanged in a market. The inquiry arises in the following context. With some exceptions, the laws of many countries permit only the donation, not the sale, of body parts. Yet for some years there has existed a shortage of body parts for transplantation and other medical uses. It might then appear that if more sales were legally permitted, the supply of body parts would increase, because people would have (...)
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  22.  26
    Panksepp?S Common Sense View of Affective Neuroscience is Not the Commonsense View in Large Areas of Neuroscience.D. Watt - 2005 - Consciousness and Cognition 14 (1):81-88.
    Jaak Panksepp’s article ‘Affective Consciousness: Core Emotional Feelings in Animals and Humans’ is a excellent review and summary by a leading empirical contributor whose work for many years has been running counter to reigning behavioristic premises in neuroscience. It may unfortunately be true that he could not get this review published in many neuroscience journals because it attacks too many sacred cows. Panksepp has given readers of Consciousness and Cognition a nicely condensed summary of much of his classic 1998 textbook, (...)
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  23.  97
    There is Nothing Paranormal About Near-Death Experiences: How Neuroscience Can Explain Seeing Bright Lights, Meeting the Dead, or Being Convinced You Are One of Them.Dean Mobbs & Caroline Watt - 2011 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 15 (10):447-449.
  24.  31
    Life and Health: A Value in Itself for Human Beings?Helen Watt - 2015 - HEC Forum 27 (3):207-228.
    The presence of a human being/organism—a living human ‘whole’, with the defining tendency to promote its own welfare—has value in itself, as do the functions which compose it. Life is inseparable from health, since without some degree of healthy functionality the living whole would not exist. The value of life differs both within a single life and between lives. As with any other form of human flourishing, the value of life-and-health must be distinguished from the moral importance of human beings: (...)
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  25.  59
    What is Basic About Basic Emotions? Lasting Lessons From Affective Neuroscience.Jaak Panksepp & Douglas Watt - 2011 - Emotion Review 3 (4):387-396.
    A cross-species affective neuroscience strategy for understanding the primary-process (basic) emotions is defended. The need for analyzing the brain and mind in terms of evolutionary stratification of functions into at least primary (instinctual), secondary (learned), and tertiary (thought-related) processes is advanced. When viewed in this context, the contentious battles between basic-emotion theorists and dimensional-constructivist approaches can be seen to be largely nonsubstantial differences among investigators working at different levels of analysis.
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  26. Aristotle on Modality: Stephen Makin.Stephen Makin - 2000 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 74 (1):143-161.
    [Stephen Makin] Aristotle draws two sets of distinctions in Metaphysics 9.2, first between non-rational and rational capacities, and second between one way and two way capacities. He then argues for three claims: [A] if a capacity is rational, then it is a two way capacity [B] if a capacity is non-rational, then it is a one way capacity [C] a two way capacity is not indifferently related to the opposed outcomes to which it can give rise I provide explanations (...)
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  27. Economic Equality: Rawls Versus Utilitarianism: Stephen W. Ball.Stephen W. Ball - 1986 - Economics and Philosophy 2 (2):225-244.
    Perhaps the most salient feature of Rawls's theory of justice which at once attracts supporters and repels critics is its apparent egalitarian conclusion as to how economic goods are to be distributed. Indeed, many of Rawls's sympathizers may find this result intuitively appealing, and regard it as Rawls's enduring contribution to the topic of economic justice, despite technical deficiencies in Rawls's contractarian, decision-theoretic argument for it which occupy the bulk of the critical literature. Rawls himself, having proposed a “coherence” theory (...)
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  28.  28
    Kant’s Transcendental Deduction, Non-Conceptualism, and the Fitness-for-Purpose Objection.Robert Watt - 2018 - Kantian Review 23 (1):65-88.
    The subject of this article is a powerful objection to the non-conceptualist interpretation of Kant’s transcendental deduction of the categories. Part of the purpose of the deduction is to refute the sort of scepticism according to which there are no objects of empirical intuition that instantiate the categories. But if the non-conceptualist interpretation is correct, it does not follow from what Kant is arguing in the transcendental deduction that this sort of scepticism is false. This article explains and assesses a (...)
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  29.  70
    Transcendental Arguments and Moral Principles.A. J. Watt - 1975 - Philosophical Quarterly 25 (98):40-57.
  30.  4
    I–Stephen Makin.Stephen Makin - 2000 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 74 (1):143-161.
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  31.  9
    The Uses of Maurice Blanchot in Bernard Stiegler's Technics and Time.Calum Watt - 2016 - Paragraph 39 (3):305-318.
    This article argues that Maurice Blanchot is a significant presence in Bernard Stiegler's Technics and Time series. The article first sets out Stiegler's invocation of the Blanchotian ‘change of epoch’ in the first volume, which attempts to situate Blanchot within the horizon of technics. I argue Blanchot's disaster is a hidden element in Stiegler's play on the motifs of the star and catastrophe. The article then traces how these motifs emerge in the second and third volumes, in which the technical (...)
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  32. Naive Psychology and the Inverted Turing Test.S. Watt - 1996 - Psycoloquy 7 (14).
    This target article argues that the Turing test implicitly rests on a "naive psychology," a naturally evolved psychological faculty which is used to predict and understand the behaviour of others in complex societies. This natural faculty is an important and implicit bias in the observer's tendency to ascribe mentality to the system in the test. The paper analyses the effects of this naive psychology on the Turing test, both from the side of the system and the side of the observer, (...)
     
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  33.  39
    Abortion for Life-Limiting Foetal Anomaly: Beneficial When and for Whom?Helen Watt - 2017 - Clinical Ethics 12 (1):1 - 10.
    Abortion for life-limiting foetal anomaly is often an intensely painful choice for the parents; though widely offered and supported, it is surprisingly difficult to defend in ethical terms. Abortion on this ground is sometimes defended as foetal euthanasia but has features which sharply differentiate it from standard non-voluntary euthanasia, not least the fact that any suffering otherwise anticipated for the child may be neither severe nor prolonged. Such abortions may be said to reduce suffering for the family including siblings – (...)
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  34.  32
    The Centrecephalon and Thalamocortical Integration: Neglected Contributions of Periaqueductal Gray.D. F. Watt - 2000 - Consciousness and Emotion 1 (1):91-114.
    I have argued in other work that emotion, attentional functions, and executive functions are three interpenetrant global state variables, essentially differential slices of the consciousness pie. This paper will outline the columnar architecture and connectivities of the PAG (periaqueductal gray), its role in organizing prototype states of emotion, and the re-entry of PAG with the extended reticular thalamic activating system (“ERTAS”). At the end we will outline some potential implications of these connectivities for possible functional correlates of PAG networks that (...)
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  35.  24
    Sense and Relativism.A. J. Watt - 1982 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 14 (2):29-45.
  36.  68
    Life and Death in Health Care Ethics: A Short Introduction.Helen Watt - 2000 - Routledge.
    In a world of rapid technological advances, the moral issues raised by life and death choices in healthcare remain obscure. _Life and Death in Healthcare Ethics_ provides a concise, thoughtful and extremely accessible guide to these moral issues. Helen Watt examines, using real-life cases, the range of choices taken by healthcare professionals, patients and clients which lead to the shortening of life. The topics looked at include: * euthanasia and withdrawal of treatment * the persistent vegetative state * abortion (...)
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  37.  9
    The Relation Between Surface and Interior Structures in Low-Amplitude Fatigue.D. P. Watt, J. D. Embury & R. K. Ham - 1968 - Philosophical Magazine 17 (145):199-203.
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  38.  56
    Islamic Philosophy and Theology.W. Montgomery Watt - 1962 - Aldinetransaction.
    Events are making clear to ever-widening circles of readers the need for something more than a superficial knowledge of non-European cultures.
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  39.  12
    Vital Conflicts, Bodily Respect, and Conjoined Twins: Are We Asking the Right Questions?Helen Watt - 2017 - In Jason Eberl (ed.), Contemporary Controversies in Catholic Bioethics. Springer. pp. 135-145.
    What does it mean to respect life and health in an innocent fellow-human being? Separating conjoined twins where one twin will die as a result need not involve the intention to kill or harm. Arguably, however, not all side-effects are “mere” side-effects which could, in principle, be outweighed by sufficiently good intended effects. Rather, foreseen serious harm for an innocent person we non-therapeutically affect can be morally conclusive when linked to the intention to affect the person’s body or invade the (...)
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  40.  16
    Spacious Awareness in Mahāyāna Buddhism and Its Role in the Modern Mindfulness Movement.Tessa Watt - 2017 - Contemporary Buddhism 18 (2):455-480.
    This paper investigates a particular understanding of ‘awareness’ in Mahāyāna Buddhism and its relevance for secular mindfulness. We will focus on the Zen and Mahāmudrā traditions which share a view of awareness as an innate wakefulness, described using metaphors of space, light and clarity. These traditions encourage practices in which the meditator rests in this spacious ‘non-dual’ awareness: Zen’s ‘just sitting’ and Mahāmudrā’s ‘open presence’. We explore the role of this approach within secular mindfulness, in particular Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction and (...)
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  41.  24
    Naturalizing Epistemology: Quine, Simon and the Prospects for Pragmatism: Stephen Stich.Stephen Stich - 1993 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 34:1-17.
    In recent years there has been a great deal of discussion about the prospects of developing a ‘naturalized epistemology’, though different authors tend to interpret this label in quite different ways. One goal of this paper is to sketch three projects that might lay claim to the ‘naturalized epistemology’ label, and to argue that they are not all equally attractive. Indeed, I'll maintain that the first of the three—the one I'll attribute to Quine—is simply incoherent. There is no way we (...)
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  42.  8
    Buddhism and the State in Sixteenth-Century Japan.Paul B. Watt & Neil McMullin - 1986 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 106 (3):616.
  43.  22
    Wittgenstein and Connectionism: A Significant Complementarity?*: Stephen Mills.Stephen Mills - 1993 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 34:137-157.
    Between the later views of Wittgenstein and those of connectionism 1 on the subject of the mastery of language there is an impressively large number of similarities. The task of establishing this claim is carried out in the second section of this paper.
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  44.  32
    Global Religion: Stephen R. L. Clark.Stephen R. L. Clark - 1994 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 36:113-128.
    The social and environmental problems that we face at this tail end of twentieth-century progress require us to identify some cause, some spirit that transcends the petty limits of our time and place. It is easy to believe that there is no crisis. We have been told too often that the oceans will soon die, the air be poisonous, our energy reserves run dry; that the world will grow warmer, coastlands be flooded and the climate change; that plague, famine and (...)
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  45. The Second-Person Standpoint An Interview with Stephen Darwall.Stephen Darwall - 2009 - The Harvard Review of Philosophy 16 (1):118-138.
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  46.  23
    Potential and the Early Human.H. Watt - 1996 - Journal of Medical Ethics 22 (4):222-226.
    Some form of potential or "capacity" is often seen as evidence of human moral status. Opinions differ as to whether the potential of the embryo should be regarded as such evidence. In this paper, I discuss some common arguments against regarding the embryo's potential as a sign of human status, together with some less common arguments in favour of regarding the embryo's potential in this way.
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  47.  40
    Forms of Knowledge and Norms of Rationality.A. J. Watt - 1974 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 6 (1):1–11.
  48.  20
    Avicenna's Psychology: An English Translation of Kitāb Al-Najāt, Book Ii, Chapter Vi, with Historico-Philosophical Notes and Textual Improvements on the Cairo Edition.W. Montgomery Watt & F. Rahman - 1952 - Hyperion Press.
  49.  3
    Experimentelle Beiträge Zu Einer Theorie des Denkens.Henry J. Watt - 1905 - Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 2 (12):331-332.
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  50.  24
    Deconstructing the Laws of Logic: Stephen R.L. Clark.Stephen R. Clark - 2008 - Philosophy 83 (1):25-53.
    I consider reasons for questioning ‘the laws of logic’, and suggest that these laws do not accord with everyday reality. Either they are rhetorical tools rather than absolute truths, or else Plato and his successors were right to think that they identify a reality distinct from the ordinary world of experience, and also from the ultimate source of reality.
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