Results for 'Loving'

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  1. Loving People for Who They Are (Even When They Don't Love You Back).Sara Protasi - 2016 - European Journal of Philosophy 24 (1):214-234.
    The debate on love's reasons ignores unrequited love, which—I argue—can be as genuine and as valuable as reciprocated love. I start by showing that the relationship view of love cannot account for either the reasons or the value of unrequited love. I then present the simple property view, an alternative to the relationship view that is beset with its own problems. In order to solve these problems, I present a more sophisticated version of the property view that integrates ideas from (...)
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  2. Playfulness, "World"-Travelling, and Loving Perception.María Lugones - 1987 - Hypatia 2 (2):3 - 19.
    A paper about cross-cultural and cross-racial loving that emphasizes the need to understand and affirm the plurality in and among women as central to feminist ontology and epistemology. Love is seen not as fusion and erasure of difference but as incompatible with them. Love reveals plurality. Unity-not to be confused with solidarity-is understood as conceptually tied to domination.
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  3.  56
    Playfulness, “World”-Travelling, and Loving Perception.María Lugones - 1987 - Hypatia 2 (2):3-19.
    A paper about cross-cultural and cross-racial loving that emphasizes the need to understand and affirm the plurality in and among women as central to feminist ontology and epistemology. Love is seen not as fusion and erasure of difference but as incompatible with them. Love reveals plurality. Unity-not to be confused with solidarity-is understood as conceptually tied to domination.
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  4.  9
    Does Loving Longer Mean Loving More? On the Nature of Enduring Affective Attitudes.Aaron Ben-Ze’ev - 2017 - Philosophia 45 (4):1541-1562.
    This article provides a conceptual map of the affective terrain while focusing on enduring positive affective attitudes, such as love and happiness. The first section of the article examines the basic characteristics of affective attitudes, i.e., intentionality, feeling, and dispositionality, and classifies the various affective attitudes accordingly. An important distinction in this regard is between acute, extended, and enduring affective attitudes. Then a discussion on the temporality of affective attitudes is presented. The second section discusses major mechanisms that enable long-lasting (...)
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  5. The Perfect Bikini Body: Can We All Really Have It? Loving Gaze as an Antioppressive Beauty Ideal.Sara Protasi - 2017 - Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 6 (2):93-101.
    In this paper, I ask whether there is a defensible philosophical view according to which everybody is beautiful. I review two purely aesthetical versions of this claim. The No Standards View claims that everybody is maximally and equally beautiful. The Multiple Standards View encourages us to widen our standards of beauty. I argue that both approaches are problematic. The former fails to be aspirational and empowering, while the latter fails to be sufficiently inclusive. I conclude by presenting a hybrid ethical–aesthetical (...)
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  6.  25
    Mindfulness and Loving-Kindness.Sharon Salzberg - 2011 - Contemporary Buddhism 12 (1):177--182.
    Mindfulness, as the word is commonly used in contemporary meditation teaching, refers to both being aware of our present moment's experience, and relating to that experience without grasping, aversion or delusion. All three habitual tendencies distort our perception of what is happening, and lead us to futile and misguided efforts to deny or control our experience. Loving-kindness is a quality of the heart that recognizes how connected we all are. Loving-kindness is essentially a form of inclusiveness of caring, (...)
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  7.  9
    Just Fanciers: Transformative Justice by Way of Fancy Rat Breeding as a Loving Form of Life.Julia D. Gibson - 2019 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 32 (1):105-126.
    A growing trend within feminist animal studies is to eschew the abolitionism/welfarism binary in favor of attending carefully to the politics of existing interspecies relationships in context. This literature maintains that domestication produces special interspecies relationships which generate ongoing responsibilities for human companions and communities. With the goal of clarifying how tending to these ongoing responsibilities to domesticated animals can qualify as enduring forms of interspecies justice, this paper unpacks the politics of these special relationships and obligations in context, specifically, (...)
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  8.  17
    Loving From Below: Of Colonial Love and Other Demons.Carolyn Ureña - 2016 - Hypatia 31 (4):86-102.
    This article explores the implications of adopting decolonial love as a theoretical and practical model for healing the wounds of coloniality by contrasting its revolutionary potential to the damaging effects of its opposite, colonial love. The latter, based in an imperialist, dualist logic, dangerously fetishizes the beloved object and participates in the oppression and subjugation of difference. Decolonial feminist theorist Chela Sandoval's concept of decolonial love, by contrast, originates “from below” and operates between those rendered other by hegemonic forces. In (...)
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  9. Loving the Fine: Virtue and Happiness in Artistotle's Ethics.Anna Lannstrom - 2006 - University of Notre Dame Press.
    Assuming that people want to be happy, can we show that they cannot be happy without being ethical, and that all rational people therefore should be able to see that it is in their own best interest to be ethical? Is it irrational to reject ethics? Aristotle thought so, claims Anna Lännström; but, she adds, he also thought that there was no way to prove it to a skeptic or an immoral person. Lännström probes Artistotle's view that desire is crucial (...)
     
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  10.  36
    Belief in a Good and Loving God: A Case Study in the Varieties of a Religious Belief.Gabriel Citron - 2014 - In Andrew Moore (ed.), God, Mind and Knowledge. Farnham, UK: Routledge. pp. 67-86.
    There has been much recent debate over the meaning of the claim that God is good and loving. Although the participants in this debate strongly disagree over the correct analysis of the claim, there is nonetheless agreement across all parties that there is a single correct analysis. This paper aims to overthrow this consensus, by showing that sentences such as ‘There is a good and loving God’ are often used to express a variety of beliefs with quite different (...)
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  11.  24
    'Tender Loving Care' as a Relational Ethic in Nursing Practice.Kevin David Kendrick & Simon Robinson - 2002 - Nursing Ethics 9 (3):291-300.
    In the West, the term ‘tender, loving care’ (TLC) has traditionally been used as a defining term that characterizes nursing. When this expression informs practice, it can comfort the human spirit at times of fear and vulnerability. Such notions offer meaning and resonance to the ‘lived experience’ of giving and receiving care. This suggests that, in a nursing context, TLC is rooted firmly in relationship, that is, the dynamic that exists between carer and cared for. Despite this emphasis on (...)
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  12.  16
    Loving Immigrants in America: The Philosophical Power of Stories. [REVIEW]Alexander V. Stehn - 2018 - Radical Philosophy Review 21 (2):365-369.
    BOOK REVIEW: Through fifteen interrelated essays, Daniel Campos’ Loving Immigrants in America reflects upon his experiences as a Latin American immigrant to the United States and develops an experiential philosophy of personal interaction. Building upon previous work, Campos’ implicit conceptual framework comes from Charles S. Peirce’s dual philosophical accounts of the evolution of personality and evolutionary love. But the flesh and blood of the book are Campos’ own personal experiences as an immigrant who has labored for more than twenty (...)
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  13.  12
    Loving the Other Beyond Death.Kas Saghafi - 2018 - Oxford Literary Review 40 (2):147-155.
    Turning to an example provided by Aristotle and taken up by Derrida in Politics of Friendship, which functions as a limit case—loving the other beyond death—I argue that Derrida's short-lived term, aimance, gently and lovingly contests the primacy given either to love or to friendship in the Western tradition, but also to the living act of loving and the figure of the lover, putting pressure on the very conceptual differences between these terms.
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  14. Loving Socrates: The Individual and the Ladder of Love in Plato's Symposium.Kristian Urstad - 2010 - Res Cogitans.
    In Plato’s Symposium, the priestess Diotima, whom Socrates introduces as an expert in love, describes how the lover who would advance rightly in erotics would ascend from loving a particular beautiful body and individual to loving Beauty itself. This hierarchy is conventionally referred to as Plato’s scala amoris or ‘ladder of love’, for the reason that the uppermost form of love cannot be reached without having initially stepped on the first rung of the ladder, which is the physical (...)
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  15.  19
    Why is Loving a Thief Not the Same as Loving All Men for the Mohists?Chaehyun Chong - 2018 - Asian Philosophy 28 (3):215-223.
    ABSTRACTThe purpose of this article is to explain the Mohists’ perceived inconsistences of the following three propositions in the Mojing since we attribute to them an unconditional love toward human beings: A thief is a man. Killing a thief is not killing men. A thief is a man. Loving a thief is not loving men. Zang is a man. Loving Zang is loving men. The attribution of unconditional love toward human beings is not unusual to the (...)
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  16.  20
    Echo and the Failure of Knowing in Judith Fox’s Photographic Project I Still Do: Loving and Living with Alzheimer’s.Agnese Sile - 2018 - Journal of Medical Humanities 39 (3):361-375.
    In relationships ‘I’ and ‘you’ become ‘we’; despite individual differences, couples obtain an interdependent identity due to their shared interactions. During a serious illness, biological and biographical disruptions can put any reciprocal relationship under strain. Through intermedial analysis of Judith Fox’s photographic project, I Still Do: Loving and Living with Alzheimer’s, I will explore ways the couple make sense of illness, how illness is communicated through text and image and also to identify the limits of representation. Here the photographs, (...)
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  17. An Ethic of Loving: Ethical Particularism and the Engaged Perspective in Confucian Role-Ethics.Sin yee Chan - 1993 - Dissertation, University of Michigan
    In personal relationships, we conceive of the related person as an individual who is more than a combination of qualities, a bearer of claims or a role-occupant. She is envisaged as a distinct and irreplaceable particular. We have immediate concerns for her that are not mediated by consideration of principles such as the promotion of welfare or the fulfillment of duty. The aim of my dissertation is to analyze and defend this particularistic concern and show how it is anchored in (...)
     
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  18.  25
    The Loving God—Some Observations on John Hick's Evil and the God of Love: Roland Puccetti.Roland Puccetti - 1967 - Religious Studies 2 (2):255-268.
    Philosophers of religion divide neatly into two camps on the problem of evil: those who think it fatal to the concept of a loving God and those who do not. The latter have established a wide array of defensive positions down through the centuries, but none that has proved impregnable to sceptical attack. In his new book Mr Hick wisely abandons these older fortifications and falls back on highly mobile reserves. Not for him the ‘Fall of Man’ thesis, with (...)
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  19.  16
    On the Difficult Case of Loving Life: Plato's Symposium and Nietzsche's Eternal Recurrence.Melanie Shepherd - 2018 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 26 (3):519-539.
    ABSTRACTA simple but significant historical fact has been overlooked in interpretations of Nietzsche's eternal recurrence. In making eternal recurrence the standard for the affirmation and love of life, Nietzsche accepts an understanding of love developed in Plato's Symposium: love means ‘wanting to possess the good forever’. I argue that Plato develops two distinct types of love, which remain in tension with one another. I then show that a corresponding tension arises in Nietzsche's work when we consider eternal recurrence as the (...)
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  20.  1
    Loving and Knowing: Reflections for an Engaged Epistemology.Hanne De Jaegher - forthcoming - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences:1-24.
    In search of our highest capacities, cognitive scientists aim to explain things like mathematics, language, and planning. But are these really our most sophisticated forms of knowing? In this paper, I point to a different pinnacle of cognition. Our most sophisticated human knowing, I think, lies in how we engage with each other, in our relating. Cognitive science and philosophy of mind have largely ignored the ways of knowing at play here. At the same time, the emphasis on discrete, rational (...)
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  21.  22
    The Lysis on Loving One's Own.David K. Glidden - 1981 - Classical Quarterly 31 (01):39-.
    Cicero, Lucullus 38: ‘…non potest animal ullum non adpetere id quod accommodatum ad naturam adpareat …’ From earliest childhood every man wants to possess something. One man collects horses. Another wants gold. Socrates has a passion for companions. He would rather have a good friend than a quail or a rooster. In this way, Socrates begins his interrogation of Menexenus. He then congratulates Menexenus and Lysis for each having what he himself still does not possess. How is it that one (...)
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  22.  19
    The “Loving Parent” Analogy.Jeff Jordan - 2017 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 82 (1):15-28.
    A crucial part of William Rowe’s evidential argument from evil implies that God, like a loving parent, would ensure that every suffering person would be aware of his comforting presence. Rowe’s use of the “loving parent” analogy however fails to survive scrutiny as it implies that God maximally loves all persons. It is the argument of this paper that no one could maximally love every person; and whatever variation there is in the divine love undercuts the claim that (...)
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  23.  18
    Loving My Neighbour, Loving Myself.Oswald Hanfling - 1993 - Philosophy 68 (264):145 - 157.
    The biblical injunction to love one's neighbour has long been regarded as a central pillar of morality. It is taken to be an ideal which gives direction to our moral aspirations, even though most of us find it difficult to live up to, owing to our selfish natures. But the difficulties I wish to raise are of a logical kind, as distinct from those depending on personal character. They fall under three headings: the first concerns the scope of ‘my neighbour’, (...)
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  24.  27
    Loving Relationships and Conflicts with Morality.Nina Brewer-Davis - 2013 - Dialogue 52 (2):359-375.
    Loving another person requires that we set that person apart from others, but morality is often thought to require that we view everyone as equally important. I argue that two approaches to the nature of love, robust concern and special perception, both miss crucial aspects of loving relationships: sensitivity to the beloveds attitude as well as the lover’s. Shared history as a necessary condition of loving relationships addresses these problems, and points the way to more productive analysis (...)
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  25.  33
    Kathy Rudy: Loving Animals: Toward a New Animal Advocacy. [REVIEW]Anna Peterson - 2012 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 25 (5):787-790.
    Kathy Rudy: Loving Animals: Toward a New Animal Advocacy Content Type Journal Article Category Book Review Pages 1-4 DOI 10.1007/s10806-011-9354-y Authors Anna Peterson, Department of Relilgion, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA Journal Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics Online ISSN 1573-322X Print ISSN 1187-7863.
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  26.  5
    On Ultimate Ends: Aquinas’s Thesis That Loving God is Better Than Knowing Him.Daniel Shields - 2014 - The Thomist 78 (4):581-607.
    I argue that, according to St. Thomas Aquinas, God--and not one's own happiness through union with God--is the ultimate end of the moral life strictly speaking. Although He is the source of happiness, God Himself, and not the happiness of knowing Him, is the center of the virtuous agent's life. Thus Aquinas, while incorporating all of the strengths of a virtue ethical framework, is not a eudaimonist in the normal sense, and is thus immune to any self-centeredness objections. I set (...)
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  27.  18
    'God so Loved the World, That He Was Born of a Woman': Mary's Place in God's Loving of His Creation.Birute Arendarcikas - 2014 - The Australasian Catholic Record 91 (2):194.
    Arendarcikas, Birute Since the Second Vatican Council and the historic embrace of Paul VI and the Patriarch of Constantinople Athenagoras I in January 1964, the pope and the hierarchs of the Roman Catholic and Eastern Orthodox Churches have, after centuries of mutual separation, embraced each other once again as sister churches. On many occasions the pope and the hierarchs of the respective churches have drawn attention to the loving veneration of, and special devotion to, Mary, the Mother of God, (...)
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  28.  13
    Loving Persons.T. Brian Mooney - unknown
    A perennial problem in the philosophy of love has centered around what it is to love persons qua persons. Plato has usually been interpreted as believing that when we love we are attaching ourselves to qualities that inhere in the objects of our love and that these qualities transcend the objects. Vlastos has argued, along with Nussbaum, Price and many others that such an account tells against a true love of persons as unique and irreplaceable individuals. I argue that Plato’s (...)
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  29.  6
    Towards a Semiotics of the "Loving Light”: The Transmodern Turn.Traian-Dinorel D. Stănciulescu∗ - 2015 - Human and Social Studies 4 (2):119-134.
    The core of what we call transmodern turn is sustained by the shaping of an ontological model of the “Essentials Unity”, in which Human Being, the World and God should be in a non-conflictual relationship of togetherness, by a resonant / holographic mechanism of light. cognizing that the world-object and metalanguage have an objective interface, religion, philosophy and modern sciences harmonise their specific assertions through a semiotics of the "loving light” capable of proving that: syntactically, the world is governed (...)
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  30. Loving Immigrants in America: An Experiential Philosophy of Personal Interaction.Daniel Campos - 2017 - Lexington Books.
    This book is a philosophical account of a Central American immigrant's personal experience in the United States. Narrative and reflective at once, it is written from the standpoint of American philosophy enriched by fiction, poetry, song lyrics and memoirs from the Americas. It recommends an ethic of love—resilient loving—for the interpersonal relations and day-to-day interactions between immigrants and hosts in the United States today.
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  31. Loving and Living. By E.M.T.M. T. E. & Loving - 1891
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  32. Loving and Dying: A Reading of Plato's Phaedo, Symposium, and Phaedrus.Richard Gotshalk - 2001 - University Press of America.
    Loving and Dying is a reading of three dialogues which, using the figure of Socrates conversing in three different concrete situations, in complementary fashion address death, love, and reflection, as matters central to finding and understanding life's meaning and to sharing in the kind of immortality that is open to a human being. The intent of the work is simply to bring to attention how the dialogues register as drama and how they achieve this provocation of the reader to (...)
     
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  33. Sinners in the Presence of a Loving God: An Essay on the Problem of Hell.R. Zachary Manis - 2019 - Oup Usa.
    In Sinners in the Presence of a Loving God, R. Zachary Manis examines in detail the several facets of the problem of hell, considers the reasons why the usual responses to the problem are unsatisfying, and suggests how an adequate solution to the problem can be constructed.
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  34. Loving Animals: Toward a New Animal Advocacy.Kathy Rudy - 2013 - Univ of Minnesota Press.
    The contemporary animal rights movement encompasses a wide range of sometimes-competing agendas from vegetarianism to animal liberation. For people for whom pets are family members—animal lovers outside the fray—extremist positions in which all human–animal interaction is suspect often discourage involvement in the movement to end cruelty to other beings. In _Loving Animals_, Kathy Rudy argues that in order to achieve such goals as ending animal testing and factory farming, activists need to be better attuned to the profound emotional, even spiritual, (...)
     
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  35. Loving Justice, Living Shakespeare.Regina Mara Schwartz - 2016 - Oxford University Press UK.
    Loving Justice, Living Shakespeare asks why love is regarded as the highest human value in some cultural sectorsDLreligion, literature and the artsDL and is not even on the map in othersDLphilosophy, law, and political thought. In the biblical vision, 'love the neighbor' is both the law and the just way to live. And yet, while religious thinkers cannot conceive of justice without love, for political philosophers, justice and love belong in completely different spheres, rational and public vs. emotional and (...)
     
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  36. It's Not About the Gift: From Givenness to Loving.Anthony J. Steinbock - 2018 - Rowman & Littlefield International.
    Leading phenomenologist Tony Steinbock intervenes in contemporary discussion around the concept of the gift, providing a critical reading of the main figures on the problem of the gift and offering a new perspective on the gift, situating it in the emotional sphere, specifically in relation to loving and humility.
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  37. Romantic Love and Loving Commitment: Articulating a Modern Ideal.Neil Delaney - 1996 - American Philosophical Quarterly 33 (4):339-356.
    This essay presents an ideal for modern Western romantic love.The basic ideas are the following: people want to form a distinctive sort of plural subject with another, what Nozick has called a "We", they want to be loved for properties of certain kinds, and they want this love to establish and sustain a special sort of commitment to them over time.
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  38. If I Could Just Stop Loving You: Anti-Love Biotechnology and the Ethics of a Chemical Breakup.Brian D. Earp, Olga A. Wudarczyk, Anders Sandberg & Julian Savulescu - 2013 - American Journal of Bioethics 13 (11):3-17.
    ?Love hurts??as the saying goes?and a certain amount of pain and difficulty in intimate relationships is unavoidable. Sometimes it may even be beneficial, since adversity can lead to personal growth, self-discovery, and a range of other components of a life well-lived. But other times, love can be downright dangerous. It may bind a spouse to her domestic abuser, draw an unscrupulous adult toward sexual involvement with a child, put someone under the insidious spell of a cult leader, and even inspire (...)
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  39. Loving Someone in Particular.Benjamin Bagley - 2015 - Ethics 125 (2):477-507.
    People loved for their beauty and cheerfulness are not loved as irreplaceable, yet people loved for “what their souls are made of” are. Or so literary romance implies; leading philosophical accounts, however, deny the distinction, holding that reasons for love either do not exist or do not include the beloved’s distinguishing features. In this, I argue, they deny an essential species of love. To account for it while preserving the beloved’s irreplaceability, I defend a model of agency on which people (...)
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  40. Loving the Good Beyond Being: The Paradoxical Sense of Levinas's “Return” to Platonism.Sarah Allen - 2007 - Studia Phaenomenologica 7 (1):75-107.
     
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  41.  32
    Loving the Eternal Recurrence.Neil Sinhababu & Kuong Un Teng - 2019 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 50 (1):106-124.
    According to the doctrine of the eternal recurrence, physical events will repeat themselves in an endless cycle, so everyone will live the same lives again and again for eternity. The first published discussion of the eternal recurrence, in GS, lays out the idea and the emotional responses one might have to it: What if some day or night a demon were to steal into your loneliest loneliness and say to you: "This life as you now live it and have lived (...)
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  42. Book Review: Compassion: Loving Our Neighbor in an Age of GlobalizationCompassion: Loving Our Neighbor in an Age of Globalization by O'ConnellMaureen H.Orbis, Maryknoll, N.Y., 2009. 242 Pp. $32.00. ISBN 978-1-57075-845-4. [REVIEW]Sharon M. Tan - 2011 - Interpretation: A Journal of Bible and Theology 65 (2):209-210.
  43.  28
    Infotality: On Living, Loving, and Dying Through Information.Joel Michael Reynolds - 2018 - American Journal of Bioethics 18 (2):33-35.
    Responding to Danaher et al. on self-tracking technologies, I argue that human lived experience is becoming increasingly mediated by generalized, statistical information, which I term our "infotality." Drawing on the work of Foucault, I argue that infotality is historically novel and best understood as the product of biopolitics, healthism, and informatics. I then critique the authors' "stance of cautious openness,” which misunderstands the aims of the technology in question and the fundamental ambiguity of the role information plays in the achievement (...)
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  44. Cultivating Loving Kindness: A Two-Stage Model of the Effects of Meditation on Empathy, Compassion, and Altruism.Jean L. Kristeller & Thomas Johnson - 2005 - Zygon 40 (2):391-408.
  45.  5
    The Effect of Loving-Kindness Meditation on Positive Emotions: A Meta-Analytic Review.Xianglong Zeng, Cleo P. K. Chiu, Rong Wang, Tian P. S. Oei & Freedom Y. K. Leung - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  46.  4
    Hating the Cute Kitten or Loving the Aggressive Pit-Bull: EC Effects Depend on CS–US Relations.Sabine Förderer & Christian Unkelbach - 2012 - Cognition and Emotion 26 (3):534-540.
  47.  17
    Loving-Kindness Meditation: A Field Study.Beatrice Alba - 2013 - Contemporary Buddhism 14 (2):187-203.
    Surveys were conducted at two metta meditation retreats in order to examine the psychological effects of metta meditation. Participants were invited to complete the survey at the beginning of the retreat, at the end of the retreat, and two weeks after the end of the retreat. Participants completed the same scales at each time phase, which included measures of happiness, compassionate love, revenge and avoidance motivation, gratitude, and a depression, anxiety and stress scale. Significant increases were found in happiness and (...)
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  48.  68
    Book Review: Honest Patriots: Loving A Country Enough To Remember Its MisdeedsHonest Patriots: Loving A Country Enough To Remember Its MisdeedsbyShriverDonald W.Jr.Oxford University Press, New York, 2005. 348 Pp. ISBN 978-0-19-515153-4. [REVIEW]Dean K. Thompson - 2008 - Interpretation: A Journal of Bible and Theology 62 (2):216-217.
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  49. Respect and Loving Attention.Carla Bagnoli - 2003 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 33 (4):483-516.
    On Kant's view, the feeling of respect is the mark of moral agency, and is peculiar to us, animals endowed with reason. Unlike any other feeling, respect originates in the contemplation of the moral law, that is, the idea of lawful activity. This idea works as a constraint on our deliberation by discounting the pretenses of our natural desires and demoting our selfish maxims. We experience its workings in the guise of respect. Respect shows that from the agent's subjective perspective, (...)
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  50.  87
    Sacred Mountains and Beloved Fetuses: Can Loving or Worshipping Something Give It Moral Status?Elizabeth Harman - 2007 - Philosophical Studies 133 (1):55-81.
    Part One addresses the question whether the fact that some persons love something, worship it, or deeply care about it, can endow moral status on that thing. I argue that the answer is “no.” While some cases lend great plausibility to the view that love or worship can endow moral status, there are other cases in which love or worship clearly fails to endow moral status. Furthermore, there is no principled way to distinguish these two types of cases, so we (...)
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