Results for 'Deborah Savage'

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  1.  53
    Transforming Conflict Through Insight. By Kenneth R. Melchin and Cheryl A. Picard and Love and Objectivity in Virtue Ethics: Aristotle, Lonergan, and Nussbaum on Emotions and Moral Insight. By Robert J. Fitterer and The Relevance of Bernard Lonergan's Notion of Self-Appropriation to a Mystical-Political Theology. By Ian B. Bell and The Subjective Dimension of Human Work: The Conversion of the Acting Person According to Karol Wojtyla/John Paul II and Bernard Lonergan. By Deborah Savage[REVIEW]Patrick Riordan - 2010 - Heythrop Journal 51 (2):356-359.
  2.  9
    Savage Inequalities Revisited: Adequacy, Equity, and State High Court Decisions.Deborah A. Verstegen, Kristan Venegas & Robert Knoeppel - 2006 - Educational Studies 40 (1):60-76.
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  3.  25
    Woman as Knower.Deborah Savage - 2014 - The Lonergan Review 5 (1):109-138.
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  4.  7
    When the Starting Place Is Lived Experience: The Pastoral and Therapeutic Implications of John Paul II’s Account of the Person.Deborah Savage - forthcoming - Christian Bioethics.
    The aim of this article1 is to provide insight into the anthropological framework that could inform the pastoral and therapeutic care of those we encounter, professionally or in our personal lives, who experience same-sex attraction. Our question here is not whether or not persons are free to ignore the natural order but to consider how to minister to those who wish to engage in the struggle to conform themselves to it—or those whom we hope to persuade to do so. Since (...)
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  5. Exploring New Terrain in Stakeholder Management and Firm Performance Through the Constructs of Procedural Justice, Commitment, and Trust. Turner Jr, Deborah Crown Core & Grant T. Savage - 2004 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 15:436-440.
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  6. The Foundations of Statistics.Leonard J. Savage - 1954 - Wiley Publications in Statistics.
    Classic analysis of the subject and the development of personal probability; one of the greatest controversies in modern statistcal thought.
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  7. In Savage-Rumbaugh, Fields, and Spiricu (Vol 19, Pg 541, 2005).S. Savage-Rumbaugh, W. M. Fields & T. Spircu - 2005 - Biology and Philosophy 20 (1):191-191.
     
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  8.  59
    The Savage Mind.Alasdair MacIntyre & Claude Levi-Strauss - 1967 - Philosophical Quarterly 17 (69):372.
    "Every word, like a sacred object, has its place. No _précis_ is possible. This extraordinary book must be read."—Edmund Carpenter, _New York Times Book Review _ "No outline is possible; I can only say that reading this book is a most exciting intellectual exercise in which dialectic, wit, and imagination combine to stimulate and provoke at every page."—Edmund Leach, _Man _ "Lévi-Strauss's books are tough: very scholarly, very dense, very rapid in argument. But once you have mastered him, human history (...)
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  9.  8
    Groups as Agents.Deborah Tollefsen - 2015 - Polity.
    In the social sciences and in everyday speech we often talk about groups as if they behaved in the same way as individuals, thinking and acting as a singular being. We say for example that "Google intends to develop an automated car", "the U.S. Government believes that Syria has used chemical weapons on its people", or that "the NRA wants to protect the rights of gun owners". We also often ascribe legal and moral responsibility to groups. But could groups literally (...)
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  10.  13
    Spontaneous Symbol Acquisition and Communicative Use by Pygmy Chimpanzees.Sue Savage-Rumbaugh, Kelly McDonald, Rose A. Sevcik, William D. Hopkins & Elizabeth Rubert - 1986 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 115 (3):211-235.
  11.  23
    Can a Chimpanzee Make a Statement?E. Sue Savage-Rumbaugh, James L. Pate, Janet Lawson, S. Tom Smith & Steven Rosenbaum - 1983 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 112 (4):457-492.
  12.  25
    Linguistically Mediated Tool Use and Exchange by Chimpanzees.E. Sue Savage-Rumbaugh, Duane M. Rumbaugh & Sally Boysen - 1978 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 1 (4):539-554.
  13.  73
    Do Apes Use Language?E. S. Savage-Rumbaugh, Duane M. Rumbaugh & Sarah T. Boysen - 1980 - American Scientist 68:49-61.
  14.  24
    Elicitation of Personal Probabilities and Expectations.Leonard Savage - 1971 - Journal of the American Statistical Association 66 (336):783-801.
  15.  10
    Music as a Coevolved System for Social Bonding.Patrick E. Savage, Psyche Loui, Bronwyn Tarr, Adena Schachner, Luke Glowacki, Steven Mithen & W. Tecumseh Fitch - forthcoming - Behavioral and Brain Sciences:1-36.
    Why do humans make music? Theories of the evolution of musicality have focused mainly on the value of music for specific adaptive contexts such as mate selection, parental care, coalition signaling, and group cohesion. Synthesizing and extending previous proposals, we argue that social bonding is an overarching function that unifies all of these theories, and that musicality enabled social bonding at larger scales than grooming and other bonding mechanisms available in ancestral primate societies. We combine cross-disciplinary evidence from archaeology, anthropology, (...)
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  16.  28
    Language as a Cause‐Effect Communication System.E. S. Savage‐Rumbaugh - 1990 - Philosophical Psychology 3 (1):55-76.
    Abstract Christopher Gauker has argued that a cause?effect analysis of the acquisition of communication skills in chimpanzees is adequate to describe the data reported in our work at the Language Research Center. I agree that the cause?effect approach to language function is the only viable method of analyzing language. Language must be studied as a process that functions to organize behavior between two or more individuals. However, the problem of language understanding is not addressed satisfactorily by the perspective offered by (...)
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  17. Review of Deborah Achtenberg's Cognition of Value in Aristotle's Ethics: Promise of Enrichment, Threat of Destruction. [REVIEW]Deborah Achtenberg - 2004 - Philosophical Quarterly 54 (216):465-468.
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  18. Sixty Years on Deborah Evans.Deborah Evans - 2009 - In B. P. O'Donohoe & R. O. Elveton (eds.), Sartre's Second Century. Cambridge Scholars Press. pp. 73.
     
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  19. Samuel Hellman and Deborah S. Hellman.Deborah S. Hellman - 1994 - Contemporary Issues in Bioethics 324:163.
     
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  20. From Extended Mind to Collective Mind.Deborah Tollefsen - 2006 - Cognitive Systems Research 7 (2):140-150.
  21.  9
    Communication, Symbolic Communication, and Language: Reply to Seidenberg and Pettito.E. Sue Savage-Rumbaugh - 1987 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 116 (3):288-292.
  22.  65
    Quid Quidditism Est?Deborah Smith - 2016 - Erkenntnis 81 (2):237-257.
    Over the last decade or so, there has been a renewed interest in a view about properties known as quidditism. However, a review of the literature reveals that ‘quidditism’ is used to cover a range of distinct views. In this paper I explore the logical space of distinct types of quidditism. The first distinction noted is between quidditism as a thesis explicitly about property individuation and quidditism as a principle of unrestricted property recombination. The distinction recently drawn by Dustin Locke (...)
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  23.  15
    Language Comprehension in Ape and Child: Evolutionary Implications.E. S. Savage-Rumbaugh & E. Rubert - 1992 - In Y. Christen & P. S. Churchland (eds.), Neurophilosophy and Alzheimer's Disease. Springer Verlag. pp. 30--48.
  24. Organizations as True Believers.Deborah Tollefsen - 2002 - Journal of Social Philosophy 33 (3):395–410.
  25. Let’s Pretend!: Children and Joint Action.Deborah Tollefsen - 2005 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 35 (1):75-97.
    According to many, joint intentional action must be understood in terms of joint intentions. Most accounts of joint intention appeal to a set of sophisticated individual intentional states. The author argues that standard accounts of joint intention exclude the possibility of joint action in young children because they presuppose that the participants have a robust theory of mind, something young children lack. But young children do engage in joint action. The author offers a revision of Michael Bratman’s analysis of joint (...)
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  26. Collective Intentionality and the Social Sciences.Deborah Perron Tollefsen - 2002 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 32 (1):25-50.
    In everyday discourse and in the context of social scientific research we often attribute intentional states to groups. Contemporary approaches to group intentionality have either dismissed these attributions as metaphorical or provided an analysis of our attributions in terms of the intentional states of individuals in the group.Insection1, the author argues that these approaches are problematic. In sections 2 and 3, the author defends the view that certain groups are literally intentional agents. In section 4, the author argues that there (...)
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  27.  11
    The ‘Social Life of Methods’: A Critical Introduction.Mike Savage - 2013 - Theory, Culture and Society 30 (4):3-21.
    This paper explores the distinctive features of the critical agenda associated with the ‘Social Life of Methods’. I argue that although this perspective can be associated with the increasing interest, often associated with scholars in Science and Technology Studies, to reflect on how methods can become objects of inquiry, it also needs to be rooted in the current crisis of positivist methods. I identify the challenge for positivism in terms of the decreasing ability of its procedures to effectively organize increasingly (...)
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  28. Savage and Modern Liberty.Samuel Moyn - 2005 - European Journal of Political Theory 4 (2):164-187.
    This article is a study of the trajectory of the contemporary French liberal philosopher Marcel Gauchet from his early, ‘anarchist’ commitments through the 1970s to his discovery and defense of liberalism, notably as expressed in his 1980 revival and interpretation of his 19th-century countryman Benjamin Constant’s post-revolutionary liberalism. Discussed in the article are Gauchet’s devotion to and revision of the portrait of primitive society he inherited from the French anthropologist Pierre Clastres, how his early political and theoretical concerns are transmuted (...)
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  29. Savage Democracy and Principle of Anarchy.Miguel Abensour - 2002 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 28 (6):703-726.
    This essay offers only a broad description of a possible comparison between 'savage democracy' in the terms of Claude Lefort and the 'principle of anarchy' according to Reiner Schurmann. First, I shall try to define savage democracy. Then, in a second move, after having clarified Schurmann's principle of anarchy, I shall outline the terms for a possible confrontation of their respective views. The point here is to show the extent to which the contextualization of democracy with anarchy, considered (...)
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  30.  21
    John Dewey's Liberalism: Individual, Community, and Self-Development.Daniel Savage - 2001 - Southern Illinois University Press.
    John Dewey's classical pragmatism, Daniel M. Savage asserts, can be used to provide a self-development-based justification of liberal democracy that shows the current debate between liberal individualism and republican communitarianism to ...
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  31. The Paradox of the Stone.C. Wade Savage - 1967 - Philosophical Review 76 (1):74-79.
  32.  6
    Savage Numbers and the Evolution of Civilization in Victorian Prehistory.Michael J. Barany - 2014 - British Journal for the History of Science 47 (2):239-255.
    This paper identifies ‘savage numbers’ – number-like or number-replacing concepts and practices attributed to peoples viewed as civilizationally inferior – as a crucial and hitherto unrecognized body of evidence in the first two decades of the Victorian science of prehistory. It traces the changing and often ambivalent status of savage numbers in the period after the 1858–1859 ‘time revolution’ in the human sciences by following successive reappropriations of an iconic 1853 story from Francis Galton's African travels. In response (...)
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  33.  47
    Parental Influence on Eating Behavior: Conception to Adolescence.Jennifer S. Savage, Jennifer Orlet Fisher & Leann L. Birch - 2007 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 35 (1):22-34.
    The first years of life mark a time of rapid development and dietary change, as children transition from an exclusive milk diet to a modified adult diet. During these early years, children's learning about food and eating plays a central role in shaping subsequent food choices, diet quality, and weight status. Parents play a powerful role in children's eating behavior, providing both genes and environment for children. For example, they influence children's developing preferences and eating behaviors by making some foods (...)
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  34.  17
    Visual Search for Emotional Expressions: Effect of Stimulus Set on Anger and Happiness Superiority.Ruth A. Savage, Stefanie I. Becker & Ottmar V. Lipp - 2016 - Cognition and Emotion 30 (4).
  35.  91
    Alignment, Transactive Memory, and Collective Cognitive Systems.Deborah P. Tollefsen, Rick Dale & Alexandra Paxton - 2013 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 4 (1):49-64.
    Research on linguistic interaction suggests that two or more individuals can sometimes form adaptive and cohesive systems. We describe an “alignment system” as a loosely interconnected set of cognitive processes that facilitate social interactions. As a dynamic, multi-component system, it is responsive to higher-level cognitive states such as shared beliefs and intentions (those involving collective intentionality) but can also give rise to such shared cognitive states via bottom-up processes. As an example of putative group cognition we turn to transactive memory (...)
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  36.  21
    Let’s Pretend!: Children and Joint Action.Deborah Tollefsen - 2005 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 35 (1):75-97.
    According to many, joint intentional action must be understood in terms of joint intentions. Most accounts of joint intention appeal to a set of sophisticated individual intentional states. The author argues that standard accounts of joint intention exclude the possibility of joint action in young children because they presuppose that the participants have a robust theory of mind, something young children lack. But young children do engage in joint action. The author offers a revision of Michael Bratman’s analysis of joint (...)
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  37. Epistemic Reactive Attitudes.Deborah Perron Tollefsen - 2017 - American Philosophical Quarterly 54 (4):353-366.
    Although there have been a number of recent discussions about the emotions that we bring with us to our epistemic endeavors, there has been little, if any, discussion of the emotions we bring with us to epistemic appraisal. This paper focuses on a particular set of emotions, the reactive attitudes. As Peter F. Strawson and others have argued, our reactive attitudes reveal something deep about our moral commitments. A similar argument can be made within the domain of epistemology. Our "epistemic (...)
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  38. Group Testimony.Deborah Tollefsen - 2007 - Social Epistemology 21 (3):299 – 311.
    The fact that much of our knowledge is gained through the testimony of others challenges a certain form of epistemic individualism. We are clearly not autonomous knowers. But the discussion surrounding testimony has maintained a commitment to what I have elsewhere called epistemic agent individualism. Both the reductionist and the anti-reductionist have focused their attention on the testimony of individuals. But groups, too, are sources of testimony - or so I shall argue. If groups can be testifiers, a natural question (...)
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  39.  42
    Scientific Theories.C. Wade Savage (ed.) - 1956 - University of Minnesota Press.
    Churchland proposes a radically new way of representing theories and their acquisition in the terms of connectionist neuro- science. ...
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  40. WIKIPEDIA and the Epistemology of Testimony.Deborah Tollefsen - 2009 - Episteme 6 (1):8-24.
    In “Group Testimony” (2007) I argued that the testimony of a group cannot be understood (or at least cannot always be understood) in a summative fashion; as the testimony of some or all of the group members. In some cases, it is the group itself that testifies. I also argued that one could extend standard reductionist accounts of the justification of testimonial belief to the case of testimonial belief formed on the basis of group testimony. In this paper, I explore (...)
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  41.  43
    Difficulties in the Theory of Personal Probability.Leonard J. Savage - 1967 - Philosophy of Science 34 (4):305-310.
  42.  50
    Stakeholder Collaboration: Implications for Stakeholder Theory and Practice. [REVIEW]Grant T. Savage, Michele D. Bunn, Barbara Gray, Qian Xiao, Sijun Wang, Elizabeth J. Wilson & Eric S. Williams - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 96 (S1):21-26.
  43.  13
    Parental Influence on Eating Behavior: Conception to Adolescence.Jennifer S. Savage, Jennifer Orlet Fisher & Leann L. Birch - 2007 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 35 (1):22-34.
    Eating behaviors evolve during the first years of life as biological and behavioral processes directed towards meeting requirements for health and growth. For the vast majority of human history, food scarcity has constituted a major threat to survival, and human eating behavior and child feeding practices have evolved in response to this threat. Because infants are born into a wide variety of cultures and cuisines, they come equipped as young omnivores with a set of behavioral predispositions that allow them to (...)
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  44. Collective Intentionality.Deborah Tollefsen - 2004 - Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  45.  81
    Descartes and the Passionate Mind.Deborah J. Brown - 2006 - Cambridge University Press.
    Descartes is often accused of having fragmented the human being into two independent substances, mind and body, with no clear strategy for explaining the apparent unity of human experience. Deborah Brown argues that, contrary to this view, Descartes did in fact have a conception of a single, integrated human being, and that in his view this conception is crucial to the success of human beings as rational and moral agents and as practitioners of science. The passions are pivotal in (...)
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  46.  30
    Gunky Objects, Junky Worlds, and Weak Mereological Universalism.Deborah Smith - 2019 - Erkenntnis 84 (1):41-55.
    Einar Bohn has argued that principles of composition must be contingent if gunky objects and junky worlds are both metaphysically possible. This paper critically examines such a case for contingentism about composition. I argue that weak mereological universalism, the principle that any two objects compose something, is consistent with the metaphysical possibility of both gunky objects and junky worlds. I further argue that, contra A. J. Cotnoir, the weak mereological universalist can accept a plausible mereological remainder axiom. The proponent of (...)
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  47.  14
    A Retrieved Context Model of the Emotional Modulation of Memory.Deborah Talmi, Lynn J. Lohnas & Nathaniel D. Daw - 2019 - Psychological Review 126 (4):455-485.
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  48.  42
    Participant Reactive Attitudes and Collective Responsibility.Deborah Tollefsen - 2003 - Philosophical Explorations 6 (3):218-234.
    The debate surrounding the issue of collective moral responsibility is often steeped in metaphysical issues of agency and personhood. I suggest that we can approach the metaphysical problems surrounding the issue of collective responsibility in a roundabout manner. My approach is reminiscent of that taken by P.F. Strawson in “Freedom and Resentment”. Strawson argues that the participant reactive attitudes - attitudes like resentment, gratitude, forgiveness and so on - provide the justification for holding individuals morally responsible. I argue that the (...)
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  49.  46
    We-Narratives and the Stability and Depth of Shared Agency.Deborah Tollefsen & Shaun Gallagher - 2017 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 47 (2):95-110.
    The basic approach to understanding shared agency has been to identify individual intentional states that are somehow “shared” by participants and that contribute to guiding and informing the actions of individual participants. But, as Michael Bratman suggests, there is a problem of stability and depth that any theory of shared agency needs to solve. Given that participants in a joint action might form shared intentions for different reasons, what binds them to one another such that they have some reason for (...)
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  50.  6
    Savage Democracy 'and 'Principle of Anarchy'.Abensour Miguel - 2002 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 28 (6):703-726.
    This essay offers only a broad description of a possible comparison between ‘savage democracy’ in the terms of Claude Lefort and the ‘principle of anarchy’ according to Reiner Schurmann. First, I shall try to define savage democracy. Then, in a second move, after having clarified Schurmann's principle of anarchy, I shall outline the terms for a possible confrontation of their respective views. The point here is to show the extent to which the contextualization of democracy with anarchy, considered (...)
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