Results for 'P. Bruce Uhrmacher'

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  1.  24
    Aesthetic, Spiritual, and Flow Experiences: Contrasts and Educational Implications.P. Bruce Uhrmacher, Christy McConnell Moroye & Bradley Conrad - 2016 - Education and Culture 32 (1):131.
    The idea for our paper began with a practical problem. As curricularists dedicated to an aesthetic approach to teaching, curriculum, and learning, we regularly provide workshops on this topic for teachers in K–12 schools. Our own work is based on Dewey’s aesthetic ideas1 and we have developed a theory called CRISPA2 that teachers may employ to create what we might call “wow” experiences in their own classrooms.3 That is, they can set up the conditions for students to have aesthetic experiences (...)
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  2.  21
    An Aesthetic Analysis of Confucian Teaching and Learning: The Case of Qifashi Teaching in China.Lingqi Meng & P. Bruce Uhrmacher - 2017 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 51 (1):24-44.
    In comparative studies, Confucian teaching and learning have multiple meanings. On the one hand, they refer to contemporary educational practices and contexts in Asian countries and regions such as mainland China, Hong Kong, Taiwan, Japan, South Korea, and Singapore. Comparative researchers contend that Confucian heritage Culture, a mixed and blended cultural tradition of Confucianism, Taoism, and Buddhism, has heavily influenced these countries and regions.1 As a result, their educational practices and contexts are different from those in Western countries.2 One indication (...)
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  3. Cultivating Curious and Creative Minds: The Role of Teachers and Teacher Educators, Part I.Annette D. Digby, Gadi Alexander, Carole G. Basile, Kevin Cloninger, F. Michael Connelly, Jessica T. DeCuir-Gunby, John P. Gaa, Herbert P. Ginsburg, Angela McNeal Haynes, Ming Fang He, Terri R. Hebert, Sharon Johnson, Patricia L. Marshall, Joan V. Mast, Allison W. McCulloch, Christina Mengert, Christy M. Moroye, F. Richard Olenchak, Wynnetta Scott-Simmons, Merrie Snow, Derrick M. Tennial, P. Bruce Uhrmacher, Shijing Xu & JeongAe You (eds.) - 2010 - R&L Education.
    Presents a plethora of approaches to developing human potential in areas not conventionally addressed. Organized in two parts, this international collection of essays provides viable educational alternatives to those currently holding sway in an era of high-stakes accountability.
     
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  4.  30
    Motivational Arousal and Task Complexity.Peter Suedfeld & P. Bruce Landon - 1970 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 83 (2p1):329.
  5.  9
    Complexity as Multidimensional Perception: The Effects of Sensory Deprivation on Concept Identification.P. Bruce Landon & Peter Suedfeld - 1977 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 10 (2):137-138.
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  6. The Problem of Spontaneous Abortion: Is the Pro-Life Position Morally Monstrous?Bruce P. Blackshaw & Daniel Rodger - 2019 - The New Bioethics 25 (2):103-120.
    A substantial proportion of human embryos spontaneously abort soon after conception, and ethicists have argued this is problematic for the pro-life view that a human embryo has the same moral status as an adult from conception. Firstly, if human embryos are our moral equals, this entails spontaneous abortion is one of humanity’s most important problems, and it is claimed this is absurd, and a reductio of the moral status claim. Secondly, it is claimed that pro-life advocates do not act as (...)
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  7. Fine-Tuning the Impairment Argument.Bruce P. Blackshaw & Perry Hendricks - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics 1:medethics-2020-106904.
    Perry Hendricks’ original impairment argument for the immorality of abortion is based on the impairment principle (TIP): if impairing an organism to some degree is immoral, then ceteris paribus, impairing it to a higher degree is also immoral. Since abortion impairs a fetus to a higher degree than fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) and giving a fetus FAS is immoral, it follows that abortion is immoral. Critics have argued that the ceteris paribus is not met for FAS and abortion, and so (...)
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  8.  17
    Altmann, EM 117 Altmann, GTM 53. Anderson Jr, D. P. Baker, V. Bruce, M. Bucciarelli, A. M. Burton, C. F. Chabris, F. Chang, N. Chater, M. H. Christiansen & G. S. Cree - 1999 - Cognitive Science 23 (4):637.
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  9.  20
    Stimulus, Task, and Environmental Characteristics as Factors in the Cognitive Processing of English Sentences.Nancy Kalish, P. Bruce Landon, Darylynn S. Rank & Peter Suedfeld - 1983 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 21 (1):1-3.
  10.  43
    Ectogenesis and the Case Against the Right to the Death of the Foetus.Bruce P. Blackshaw & Daniel Rodger - 2019 - Bioethics 33 (1):76-81.
    Ectogenesis, or the use of an artificial womb to allow a foetus to develop, will likely become a reality within a few decades, and could significantly affect the abortion debate. We first examine the implications for Judith Jarvis Thomson’s violinist analogy, which argues for a woman’s right to withdraw life support from the foetus and so terminate her pregnancy, even if the foetus is granted full moral status. We show that on Thomson’s reasoning, there is no right to the death (...)
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  11. Frozen Embryos and The Obligation to Adopt.Bruce P. Blackshaw & Nicholas Colgrove - 2020 - Bioethics (8):1-5.
    Rob Lovering has developed an interesting new critique of views that regard embryos as equally valuable as other human beings: the moral argument for frozen human embryo adoption. The argument is aimed at those who believe that the death of a frozen embryo is a very bad thing, and Lovering concludes that some who hold this view ought to prevent one of these deaths by adopting and gestating a frozen embryo. Contra Lovering, we show that there are far more effective (...)
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  12.  56
    The Impairment Argument for the Immorality of Abortion: A Reply.Bruce P. Blackshaw - 2019 - Bioethics 33 (6):723-724.
    In his recent article Perry Hendricks presents what he calls the impairment argument to show that abortion is immoral. To do so, he argues that to give a fetus fetal alcohol syndrome is immoral. Because killing the fetus impairs it more than giving it fetal alcohol syndrome, Hendricks concludes that killing the fetus must also be immoral. Here, I claim that killing a fetus does not impair it in the way that giving it fetal alcohol syndrome does. By examining the (...)
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  13.  26
    The Ethics of Killing: Strengthening the Substance View with Time-Relative Interests.Bruce P. Blackshaw - 2019 - The New Bioethics (Online):1-17.
    The substance view is an account of personhood that regards all human beings as possessing instrinsic value and moral status equivalent to that of an adult human being. Consequently, substance view proponents typically regard abortion as impermissible in most circumstances. The substance view, however, has difficulty accounting for certain intuitions regarding the badness of death for embryos and fetuses, and the wrongness of killing them. Jeff McMahan’s time-relative interest account is designed to cater for such intuitions, and so I present (...)
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  14.  8
    The Heuristic Basis of Remembering and Classification: Fluency, Generation, and Resemblance.Bruce W. A. Whittlesea & Jason P. Leboe - 2000 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 129 (1):84-106.
  15.  58
    Meeting the Epicurean Challenge: A Reply to Christensen.Bruce P. Blackshaw & Daniel Rodger - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (7):478-479.
    In ’Abortion and deprivation: a reply to Marquis’, Anna Christensen contends that Don Marquis’ influential ’future like ours’ argument for the immorality of abortion faces a significant challenge from the Epicurean claim that human beings cannot be harmed by their death. If deprivation requires a subject, then abortion cannot deprive a fetus of a future of value, as no individual exists to be deprived once death has occurred. However, the Epicurean account also implies that the wrongness of murder is also (...)
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  16.  36
    The Impairment Argument for the Immorality of Abortion Revisited.Bruce P. Blackshaw - 2019 - Bioethics (Online):211-213.
    Perry Hendricks has recently presented the impairment argument for the immorality of abortion, to which I responded and he has now replied. The argument is based on the premise that impairing a fetus with fetal alcohol syndrome is immoral, and on the principle that if impairing an organism is immoral, impairing it to a higher degree is also—the impairment principle. If abortion impairs a fetus to a higher degree, then this principle entails abortion is immoral. In my reply, I argued (...)
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  17.  19
    No Conscientious Objection Without Normative Justification: A Reply.Bruce P. Blackshaw - 2019 - Bioethics 33 (4):522-523.
    Benjamin Zolf, in his recent paper ‘No conscientious objection without normative justification: Against conscientious objection in medicine’, attempts to establish that in order to rule out arbitrary conscientious objections, a reasonability constraint is necessary. This, he contends, requires normative justification, and the subjective beliefs that ground conscientious objections cannot easily be judged by normative criteria. Zolf shows that the alternative of using extrinsic criteria, such as requiring that unjustified harm must not be caused, are likewise grounded on normative criteria. He (...)
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  18.  6
    A Frequency Theory of Verbal-Discrimination Learning.Bruce R. Ekstrand, William P. Wallace & Benton J. Underwood - 1966 - Psychological Review 73 (6):566-578.
  19.  16
    Resuscitating the Elderly: What Do the Patients Want?P. Bruce-Jones, H. Roberts, L. Bowker & V. Cooney - 1996 - Journal of Medical Ethics 22 (3):154-159.
    OBJECTIVES: To study the resuscitation preferences, choice of decision-maker, views on the seeking of patients' wishes and determinants of these of elderly hospital in-patients. DESIGN: Questionnaire administered on admission and prior to discharge. SETTING: Two acute geriatric medicine units (Southampton and Poole). PARTICIPANTS: Two hundred and fourteen consecutive consenting mentally competent patients admitted to hospital as emergencies. RESULTS: Resuscitation was wanted by 60%, particularly married and functionally independent patients and those who had not already considered it. Not wanted resuscitation was (...)
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  20. Beyond Infanticide: How Psychological Accounts of Persons Can Justify Harming Infants.Daniel Rodger, Bruce P. Blackshaw & Calum Miller - 2018 - The New Bioethics 24 (2):106-121.
    It is commonly argued that a serious right to life is grounded only in actual, relatively advanced psychological capacities a being has acquired. The moral permissibility of abortion is frequently argued for on these grounds. Increasingly it is being argued that such accounts also entail the permissibility of infanticide, with several proponents of these theories accepting this consequence. We show, however, that these accounts imply the permissibility of even more unpalatable acts than infanticide performed on infants: organ harvesting, live experimentation, (...)
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  21.  28
    P.A. Sabatier, W. Focht, M. Lubell, Z. Trachtenberg, A. Vedlitz and M. Matlock : Swimming Upstream. Collaborative Approaches to Watershed Management. [REVIEW]Bruce P. Hooper - 2007 - Knowledge, Technology & Policy 20 (3):215-217.
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  22.  44
    Paradox and Mystery in Theology.Bruce P. Baugus - 2013 - Heythrop Journal 54 (2):238-251.
    The question of paradox in Christian theology continues to attract attention in contemporary philosophical theology. Much of this attention understandably centers on the epistemological problems paradoxical claims pose for Christian faith. But even among those who conclude that certain points of Christian theology are paradoxical and that belief in paradoxical points of doctrine is epistemically supportable, concepts of the nature and function of paradox in Christian theology differ significantly. In this essay, after briefly noting the diversity of phenomena that count (...)
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  23.  81
    An Issue of Originality and Priority: The Correspondence and Theories of Oxidative Phosphorylation of Peter Mitchell and Robert J.P. Williams, 1961–1980. [REVIEW]Bruce H. Weber & John N. Prebble - 2006 - Journal of the History of Biology 39 (1):125-163.
    In the same year, 1961, Peter D. Mitchell and Robert R.J.P. Williams both put forward hypotheses for the mechanism of oxidative phosphorylation in mitochondria and photophosphorylation in chloroplasts. Mitchell's proposal was ultimately adopted and became known as the chemiosmotic theory. Both hypotheses were based on protons and differed markedly from the then prevailing chemical theory originally proposed by E.C. Slater in 1953, which by 1961 was failing to account for a number of experimental observations. Immediately following the publication of Williams (...)
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  24. Three Centuries of Poor Law Administration.Margaret Creech, Edith Abbott, Alice Shaffer, Mary Wysor Keefer, Sophonisba P. Breckinridge & Isabel Campbell Bruce - 1936 - International Journal of Ethics 47 (1):127-128.
     
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  25.  5
    Taste.Bruce P. Halpern - 2002 - In J. Wixted & H. Pashler (eds.), Stevens' Handbook of Experimental Psychology. Wiley.
  26.  9
    A Little Goes a Long Way: Low Working Memory Load Is Associated with Optimal Distractor Inhibition and Increased Vagal Control Under Anxiety.Derek P. Spangler & Bruce H. Friedman - 2017 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 11.
  27.  53
    An Issue of Originality and Priority: The Correspondence and Theories of Oxidative Phosphorylation of Peter Mitchell and Robert J.P. Williams, 1961–1980.Bruce H. Weber & John N. Prebble - 2006 - Journal of the History of Biology 39 (1):125-163.
    In the same year, 1961, Peter D. Mitchell and Robert R.J.P. Williams both put forward hypotheses for the mechanism of oxidative phosphorylation in mitochondria and photophosphorylation in chloroplasts. Mitchell's proposal was ultimately adopted and became known as the chemiosmotic theory. Both hypotheses were based on protons and differed markedly from the then prevailing chemical theory originally proposed by E.C. Slater in 1953, which by 1961 was failing to account for a number of experimental observations. Immediately following the publication of Williams's (...)
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  28.  52
    Why Arguments Against Infanticide Remain Convincing: A Reply to Räsänen.Daniel Rodger, Bruce P. Blackshaw & Clinton Wilcox - 2018 - Bioethics 32 (3):215-219.
    In ‘Pro-life arguments against infanticide and why they are not convincing’ Joona Räsänen argues that Christopher Kaczor's objections to Giubilini and Minerva's position on infanticide are not persuasive. We argue that Räsänen's criticism is largely misplaced, and that he has not engaged with Kaczor's strongest arguments against infanticide. We reply to each of Räsänen's criticisms, drawing on the full range of Kaczor's arguments, as well as adding some of our own.
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  29.  8
    The Stoichedon Style in Greek Inscriptions. By R. P. Austin. Pp. Xii + 130; Pl. 14. Oxford: University Press, 1938. 10s. 6d. [REVIEW]T. Bruce Mitford & R. P. Austin - 1939 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 59 (2):299-299.
  30.  40
    Resuscitation Decisions in the Elderly: A Discussion of Current Thinking.P. N. Bruce-Jones - 1996 - Journal of Medical Ethics 22 (5):286-291.
    Decisions about cardiopulmonary resuscitation may be based on medical prognosis, quality of life and patients' choices. Low survival rates indicate its overuse. Although the concept of medical futility has limitations, several strong predictors of non-survival have been identified and prognostic indices developed. Early results indicate that consideration of resuscitation in the elderly should be very selective, and support "opt-in" policies. In this minority of patients, quality of life is the principal issue. This is subjective and best assessed by the individual (...)
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  31.  23
    From Pixels to People: A Model of Familiar Face Recognition.A. Mike Burton, Vicki Bruce & P. J. B. Hancock - 1999 - Cognitive Science 23 (1):1-31.
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  32. Gestaticide: Killing the Subject of the Artificial Womb.Daniel Rodger, Nicholas Colgrove & Bruce P. Blackshaw - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Ethics.
    The rapid development of artificial womb technologies means that we must consider if and when it is permissible to kill the human subject of ectogestation—recently termed a ‘gestateling’ by Elizabeth Chloe Romanis—prior to ‘birth’. We describe the act of deliberately killing the gestateling as gestaticide, and argue that there are good reasons to maintain that gestaticide is morally equivalent to infanticide, which we consider to be morally impermissible. First, we argue that gestaticide is harder to justify than abortion, primarily because (...)
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  33.  5
    Chakravarthi Ram-Prasad in Conversation with Bruce Janz, Jessica Locke, and Cynthia Willett.Bruce B. Janz, Jessica Locke, Cynthia Willett & Chakravarthi Ram-Prasad - 2019 - Journal of World Philosophies 4 (2):124-153.
    Bruce Janz, Jessica Locke, and Cynthia Willett interact in this exchange with different aspects of Chakravarthi Ram-Prasad’s book Human Being, Bodily Being. Through “constructive inter-cultural thinking”, they seek to engage with Ram-Prasad’s “lower-case p” phenomenology, which exemplifies “how to think otherwise about the nature and role of bodiliness in human experience”. This exchange, which includes Ram-Prasad’s reply to their interventions, pushes the reader to reflect more about different aspects of bodiliness.
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  34.  48
    On Disembodied Resurrected Persons: A Reply: BRUCE R. REICHENBACH.Bruce R. Reichenbach - 1982 - Religious Studies 18 (2):225-229.
    In a recent article in Religious Studies, Professor P. W. Gooch attempts to wean the orthodox Christian from anthropological materialism by consideration of the question of the nature of the post-mortem person in the resurrection. He argues that the view that the resurrected person is a psychophysical organism who is in some physical sense the same as the ante-mortem person is inconsistent with the Pauline view of the resurrected body; rather, according to him, Paul's view is most consistent with that (...)
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  35.  21
    Eric Alden Smith and Bruce Winterhalder, Eds., Evolutionary Ecology and Human Behavior. Aldine de Gruyter, New York, 1992. Pp. XV, 470, Tables, Boxes, Figures, Bibliography, Author Index, Subject Index. $59.95 (Cloth), $29.95 (Paper. [REVIEW]Andrew P. Vayda - 1995 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 25 (2):219-249.
  36. Genetic Selective Abortion: Still a Matter of Choice.Bruce P. Blackshaw - 2020 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 23 (2):445-455.
    Jeremy Williams has argued that if we are committed to a liberal pro-choice stance with regard to selective abortion for disability, we will be unable to justify the prohibition of sex selective abortion. Here, I apply his reasoning to selective abortion based on other traits pregnant women may decide are undesirable. These include susceptibility to disease, level of intelligence, physical appearance, sexual orientation, religious belief and criminality—in fact any traits attributable to some degree to a genetic component. Firstly, I review (...)
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  37.  5
    Civic Learning for a Democracy in Crisis.Bruce Jennings, Michael K. Gusmano, Gregory E. Kaebnick, Carolyn P. Neuhaus & Mildred Z. Solomon - 2021 - Hastings Center Report 51 (S1):2-4.
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  38.  75
    Bruce L. Kinzer, Ann P. Robson and John M. Robson, A Moralist In and Out of Parliament: John Stuart Mill at Westminster, 1865–1868, Toronto, University of Toronto Press, 1992. Pp. Viii + 317. [REVIEW]Richard Ashcraft - 1994 - Utilitas 6 (1):140.
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  39.  13
    Good and Bad Ways to Think About Religion and Politics by Robert Benne, And: The Way of Peace: Christian Life in the Face of Discord by James M. Childs Jr.Bruce P. Rittenhouse - 2013 - Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics 33 (1):195-197.
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  40.  10
    Smith, Wanda J., Richard E. Wokutch, K. Vernard Harrington, And.Bruce Seifert, Sara A. Morris, Barbara R. Bartkus, Mark P. Sharfman, Teresa M. Shaft & Laszlo Tihanyi - 2004 - Business and Society 43 (4):437-439.
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  41. Verse: Of the Sage Tzu Ya.Bruce P. Woodford - 1955 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 36 (1):28.
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  42.  21
    Bruce O’Brien and Barbara Bombi, Eds., “Textus Roffensis”: Law, Language, and Libraries in Early Medieval England. Turnhout: Brepols, 2015. Pp. Xiv, 415; 10 Black-and-White Figures, 1 Map, and 16 Tables. €100. ISBN: 978-2-503-54233-1. [REVIEW]Nicholas P. Schwartz - 2017 - Speculum 92 (4):1226-1228.
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  43. Edgar Bruce Wesley (1891-1980): His Contributions to the Past, Present and Future of the Social Studies.Stanley P. Wronski - 1982 - Journal of Thought 17 (3):55-67.
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  44.  30
    Defining Life From Death: Problems with the Somatic Integration Definition of Life.Bruce P. Blackshaw & Daniel Rodger - 2020 - Bioethics (5):1-5.
    To determine when the life of a human organism begins, Mark T. Brown has developed the somatic integration definition of life. Derived from diagnostic criteria for human death, Brown’s account requires the presence of a life‐regulation internal control system for an entity to be considered a living organism. According to Brown, the earliest point at which a developing human could satisfy this requirement is at the beginning of the fetal stage, and so the embryo is not regarded as a living (...)
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  45.  34
    Does the Identity Objection to the Future‐Like‐Ours Argument Succeed?Bruce P. Blackshaw - 2019 - Bioethics 34 (2):203-206.
    Eric Vogelstein has defended Don Marquis’ ‘future-like-ours’ argument for the immorality of abortion against what is known as the Identity Objection, which contends that for a fetus to have a future like ours, it must be numerically identical to an entity like us that possesses valuable experiences some time in the future. On psychological accounts of personal identity, there is no identity relationship between the fetus and the entity with valuable experiences that it will become. Vogelstein maintains that a non‐sentient (...)
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  46. Is Pregnancy Really a Good Samaritan Act?Bruce P. Blackshaw - forthcoming - Christian Bioethics.
    One of the most influential philosophical arguments in favour of the permissibility of abortion is Judith Jarvis Thomson’s violinist analogy, presented in ‘A Defense of Abortion’. Its appeal for pro-choice advocates lies in Thomson’s granting that the fetus is a person with equivalent moral status to any other human being, and yet demonstrating—to those who accept her reasoning—that abortion is still permissible. In her argument, Thomson draws heavily on the parable of the Good Samaritan, arguing that gestating a fetus in (...)
     
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  47.  7
    Legal Punishment, Abortion and the Substance View.Bruce P. Blackshaw - 2019 - The New Bioethics (3):1-3.
    A response to Henrik Friberg-Fernros' commentary on ‘The Ethics of Killing: Strengthening the Substance View with Time-relative Interests’.
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  48.  3
    Legal Punishment, Abortion and the Substance View.Bruce P. Blackshaw - 2019 - The New Bioethics 26 (3):275-277.
    A response to Henrik Friberg-Fernros' commentary on ‘The Ethics of Killing: Strengthening the Substance View with Time-relative Interests’.
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  49. Schrödinger’s Fetus Examined.Bruce P. Blackshaw - 2019 - Medicine, Healthcare and Philosophy:1-3.
    Joona Räsänen has proposed a concept he calls Schrödinger’s Fetus as a solution to reconciling what he believes are two widely held but contradictory intuitions. I show that Elizabeth Harman’s Actual Future Principle, upon which Schrödinger’s Fetus is based, uses a more convincing account of personhood. I also argue that both Räsänen and Harman, by embracing animalism, weaken their arguments by allowing Don Marquis’ ‘future like ours’ argument for the immorality of abortion into the frame.
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  50.  55
    Why a Right to Life Rules Out Infanticide: A Final Reply to Räsänen.Bruce P. Blackshaw & Daniel Rodger - 2019 - Bioethics 33 (8):965-967.
    Joona Räsänen has argued that pro‐life arguments against the permissibility of infanticide are not persuasive, and fail to show it to be immoral. We responded to Räsänen’s arguments, concluding that his critique of pro‐life arguments was misplaced. Räsänen has recently replied in ‘Why pro‐life arguments still are not convincing: A reply to my critics’, providing some additional arguments as to why he does not find pro‐life arguments against infanticide convincing. Here, we respond briefly to Räsänen’s critique of the substance view, (...)
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