Results for 'Caragh Brosnan'

(not author) ( search as author name )
22 found
Order:
  1.  19
    The Significance of Scientific Capital in UK Medical Education.Caragh Brosnan - 2011 - Minerva 49 (3):317-332.
    For decades, debates over medical curriculum reform have centred on the role of science in medical education, but the meaning of ‘science’ in this domain is vague and the persistence of the debate has not been explained. Following Bourdieu, this paper examines struggles over legitimate knowledge and the forms of capital associated with science in contemporary UK medical education. Data are presented from a study of two UK medical schools, one with a traditional, science-oriented curriculum, another with an integrated curriculum. (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  2.  3
    Between the Bench, the Bedside and the Office: The Need to Build Bridges Between Working Neuroscientists and Ethicists.Caragh Brosnan & Alan Cribb - 2014 - Clinical Ethics 9 (4):113-119.
    This paper presents findings from an empirical study that explored the meaning of ethics in the everyday work of neuroscientists. Observation and interviews were carried out in one neuroscience research group that was involved in bench-to-bedside translational research. We focus here specifically on the scientists’ perceptions of bioethics. Interviewees were often unfamiliar with bioethics as a discipline, particularly the more junior members of the group. Those who were aware of its existence largely viewed it as something distant from them, and (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  3.  15
    Examining Interprofessional Education Through the Lens of Interdisciplinarity: Power, Knowledge and New Ontological Subjects.Rebecca E. Olson & Caragh Brosnan - 2017 - Minerva 55 (3):299-319.
    Interprofessional education – students of different professions learning together, from and about each other – is increasingly common in health professional degrees. Despite its explicit aims of transforming identities, practices and relationships within/across health professions, IPE remains under-theorised sociologically, with most IPE scholarship focussed on evaluating specific interventions. In particular, the significance of a shared knowledge base for shaping professional power and subjectivity in IPE has been overlooked. In this paper we begin to develop a framework for theorising IPE in (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  4.  6
    Disclosure of Suicidal Thoughts During an E-Mental Health Intervention: Relational Ethics Meets Actor-Network Theory.Milena Heinsch, Jenny Geddes, Dara Sampson, Caragh Brosnan, Sally Hunt, Hannah Wells & Frances Kay-Lambkin - 2021 - Ethics and Behavior 31 (3):151-170.
    ABSTRACT The technological revolution has created enormous opportunities for the provision of affordable, accessible, and flexible mental healthcare. Yet it also creates complexities and ethical challenges. While some of these challenges may be similar to face-to-face care, their nuance in the online milieu is different, as relationships, identities and boundaries in this setting are fluid, and there is an absence of physical presence. In this paper we consider the specific ethical complexities involved in the provision of a social networking intervention (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. Do the Evolutionary Origins of Our Moral Beliefs Undermine Moral Knowledge?Kevin Brosnan - 2011 - Biology and Philosophy 26 (1):51-64.
    According to some recent arguments, if our moral beliefs are products of natural selection, then we do not have moral knowledge. In defense of this inference, its proponents argue that natural selection is a process that fails to track moral facts. In this paper, I argue that our having moral knowledge is consistent with, the hypothesis that our moral beliefs are products of natural selection, and the claim that natural selection fails to track moral facts. I also argue that natural (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   47 citations  
  6.  42
    Quasi-Independence, Fitness, and Advantageousness.Kevin Brosnan - 2009 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 40 (3):228-234.
    I argue that the idea of ‘quasi-independence’ [Lewontin, R. C. . Adaptation. Scientific American, 239, 212–230] cannot be understood without attending to the distinction between fitness and advantageousness [Sober, E. . Philosophy of biology. Boulder: Westview Press]. Natural selection increases the frequency of fitter traits, not necessarily of advantageous ones. A positive correlation between an advantageous trait and a disadvantageous one may prevent the advantageous trait from evolving. The quasi-independence criterion is aimed at specifying the conditions under which advantageous traits (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  7.  36
    A Proximate Perspective on Reciprocal Altruism.Sarah F. Brosnan & Frans B. M. de Waal - 2002 - Human Nature 13 (1):129-152.
    The study of reciprocal altruism, or the exchange of goods and services between individuals, requires attention to both evolutionary explanations and proximate mechanisms. Evolutionary explanations have been debated at length, but far less is known about the proximate mechanisms of reciprocity. Our own research has focused on the immediate causes and contingencies underlying services such as food sharing, grooming, and cooperation in brown capuchin monkeys and chimpanzees. Employing both observational and experimental techniques, we have come to distinguish three types of (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  8.  12
    Incongruence Between Observers’ and Observed Facial Muscle Activation Reduces Recognition of Emotional Facial Expressions From Video Stimuli.Tanja S. H. Wingenbach, Mark Brosnan, Monique C. Pfaltz, Michael M. Plichta & Chris Ashwin - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  9.  14
    Quasi-Independence, Fitness, and Advantageousness.Kevin Brosnan - 2009 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 40 (3):228-234.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  10.  71
    Power and Participation: An Examination of the Dynamics of Mental Health Service-User Involvement in Ireland.Liz Brosnan - 2012 - Studies in Social Justice 6 (1):45-66.
    Discourse and rhetoric of service-user involvement are pervasive in all mental health services that see themselves as promoting a Recovery ethos. Yet, for the service-user movement internationally, ‘Recovery’ was articulated as an alternative discourse of overcoming and resisting an institutionalized and oppressive psychiatric model of care. Power is all pervasive within mental health services yet often overlooked in official discourse on user-involvement. Critical research is required to expose the unacknowledged structural and power constraints on participants. My research problematizes practices of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11. Book Review: Nobler Imaginings and Mightier Struggles’: Octavia Hill, Social Activism and the Remaking of British Society. [REVIEW]Jennifer Brosnan - 2017 - European Journal of Women's Studies 24 (3):304-306.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12.  59
    A Cross-Species Perspective on the Selfishness Axiom.Sarah F. Brosnan & Frans B. M. de Waal - 2005 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (6):818-818.
    Henrich et al. describe an innovative research program investigating cross-cultural differences in the selfishness axiom (in economic games) in humans, yet humans are not the only species to show such variation. Chimpanzees and capuchin monkeys show signs of deviating from the standard self-interest paradigm in experimental settings by refusing to take foods that are less valuable than those earned by conspecifics, indicating that they, too, may pay attention to relative gains. However, it is less clear whether these species also show (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13.  1
    Frans B. M. De Waal: Mama’s Last Hug: Animal Emotions and What They Tell Us About Ourselves.Sarah F. Brosnan - 2021 - Evolutionary Studies in Imaginative Culture 5 (1):77-80.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14.  3
    Calcium Channels and Signal Transduction in Plant Cells.Eva Johannes, James M. Brosnan & Dale Sanders - 1991 - Bioessays 13 (7):331-336.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15.  3
    Rational Choices of Humans, Rhesus Macaques, and Capuchin Monkeys in Dynamic Stochastic Environments.Julia Watzek & Sarah F. Brosnan - 2018 - Cognition 178:109-117.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16.  6
    Nudges for Judges: An Experiment on the Effect of Making Sentencing Costs Explicit.Eyal Aharoni, Heather M. Kleider-Offutt, Sarah F. Brosnan & Morris B. Hoffman - 2022 - Frontiers in Psychology 13.
    Judges are typically tasked to consider sentencing benefits but not costs. Previous research finds that both laypeople and prosecutors discount the costs of incarceration when forming sentencing attitudes, raising important questions about whether professional judges show the same bias during sentencing. To test this, we used a vignette-based experiment in which Minnesota state judges reviewed a case summary about an aggravated robbery and imposed a hypothetical sentence. Using random assignment, half the participants received additional information about plausible negative consequences of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17.  13
    Understanding the Challenges of Palliative Care in Everyday Clinical Practice: An Example From a COPD Action Research Project.Geralyn Hynes, Fiona Kavanagh, Christine Hogan, Kitty Ryan, Linda Rogers, Jenny Brosnan & David Coghlan - 2015 - Nursing Inquiry 22 (3):249-260.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  18.  11
    God Infinite and Reason, Concerning the Attributes of God. By William J. Brosnan. S. J. Ph.D. (New York: The American Press, 1928. Pp. 236.). [REVIEW]E. M. Whetnall - 1929 - Philosophy 4 (15):414-.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19. Challenges to Moral and Religious Belief: Disagreement and Evolution.Michael Bergmann & Patrick Kain (eds.) - 2014 - Oxford University Press.
    Challenges to Moral and Religious Belief contains fourteen original essays by philosophers, theologians, and social scientists on challenges to moral and religious belief from disagreement and evolution. Three main questions are addressed: Can one reasonably maintain one's moral and religious beliefs in the face of interpersonal disagreement with intellectual peers? Does disagreement about morality between a religious belief source, such as a sacred text, and a non-religious belief source, such as a society's moral intuitions, make it irrational to continue trusting (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  20.  7
    Moral Markets: The Critical Role of Values in the Economy.Paul J. Zak (ed.) - 2008 - Princeton University Press.
    Like nature itself, modern economic life is driven by relentless competition and unbridled selfishness. Or is it? Drawing on converging evidence from neuroscience, social science, biology, law, and philosophy, Moral Markets makes the case that modern market exchange works only because most people, most of the time, act virtuously. Competition and greed are certainly part of economics, but Moral Markets shows how the rules of market exchange have evolved to promote moral behavior and how exchange itself may make us more (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  21. Joint Ventures Require Joint Payoffs: Fairness Among Primates.Frans de Waal - 2006 - Social Research: An International Quarterly 73:349-364.
    Cooperative animals often find themselves in situations in which they need to monitor and compare pay-offs received from joint ventures. They can compare their pay-offs with a) the history of giving to and receiving from the same partner, b) the effort they put into the venture, or c) what others are getting. There is ample observational evidence that monkeys and apes follow rules of social reciprocity. There is also evidence for market effects of supply and demand. In a series of (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  22. Joint Ventures Require Joint Payoffs: Fairness Among Primates.Frans Bm de Waal - 2006 - Social Research: An International Quarterly 73 (2):349-364.
    Cooperative animals often find themselves in situations in which they need to monitor and compare pay-offs received from joint ventures. They can compare their pay-offs with a) the history of giving to and receiving from the same partner , b) the effort they put into the venture , or c) what others are getting . There is ample observational evidence that monkeys and apes follow rules of social reciprocity. There is also evidence for market effects of supply and demand . (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation