Results for 'infanticide'

174 found
Order:
  1.  98
    The Ethics of Killing: Problems at the Margins of Life.Jeff McMahan - 2002 - Oup Usa.
    This magisterial work is the first comprehensive study of the ethics of killing, where the moral status of the individual is uncertain or controversial. Drawing on philosophical notions of personal identity and the wrongness of killing, McMahan looks carefully at a host of practical issues including abortion, infanticide, the killing of animals, assisted suicide and euthanasia.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   117 citations  
  2. After-Birth Abortion: Why Should the Baby Live?A. Giubilini & F. Minerva - 2013 - Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (5):261-263.
    Abortion is largely accepted even for reasons that do not have anything to do with the fetus' health. By showing that (1) both fetuses and newborns do not have the same moral status as actual persons, (2) the fact that both are potential persons is morally irrelevant and (3) adoption is not always in the best interest of actual people, the authors argue that what we call ‘after-birth abortion’ (killing a newborn) should be permissible in all the cases where abortion (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   19 citations  
  3. Abortion and Infanticide.Michael Tooley - 1972 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 2 (1):37-65.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   98 citations  
  4.  36
    If Abortion, Then Infanticide.David B. Hershenov & Rose J. Hershenov - 2017 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 38 (5):387-409.
    Our contention is that all of the major arguments for abortion are also arguments for permitting infanticide. One cannot distinguish the fetus from the infant in terms of a morally significant intrinsic property, nor are they morally discernible in terms of standing in different relationships to others. The logic of our position is that if such arguments justify abortion, then they also justify infanticide. If we are right that infanticide is not justified, then such arguments will fail (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  5. The Ethics of Abortion: Women's Rights, Human Life, and the Question of Justice.Christopher Kaczor - 2010 - Routledge.
    Appealing to reason rather than religious belief, this book is the most comprehensive case against the choice of abortion yet published. _The Ethics of Abortion_ critically evaluates all the major grounds for denying fetal personhood, including the views of those who defend not only abortion but also infanticide. It also provides several justifications for the conclusion that all human beings, including those in utero, should be respected as persons. This book also critiques the view that abortion is not wrong (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   10 citations  
  6.  11
    Why Arguments Against Infanticide Remain Convincing: A Reply to Räsänen.Rodger Daniel, Bruce Blackshaw & Wilcox Clinton - forthcoming - Bioethics.
    In ‘Pro-life arguments against infanticide and why they are not convincing’ Joona Räsänen argues that Christopher Kaczor's objections to Giubilini and Minerva's position on infanticide are not persuasive. We argue that Räsänen's criticism is largely misplaced, and that he has not engaged with Kaczor's strongest arguments against infanticide. We reply to each of Räsänen's criticisms, drawing on the full range of Kaczor's arguments, as well as adding some of our own.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  7. Bananas Enough for Time Travel?Nicholas J. J. Smith - 1997 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 48 (3):363-389.
    This paper argues that the most famous objection to backward time travel can carry no weight. In its classic form, the objection is that backward time travel entails the occurrence of impossible things, such as auto-infanticide—and hence is itself impossible. David Lewis has rebutted the classic version of the objection: auto-infanticide is prevented by coincidences, such as time travellers slipping on banana peels as they attempt to murder their younger selves. I focus on Paul Horwich‘s more recent version (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   28 citations  
  8.  17
    Pro‐Life Arguments Against Infanticide and Why They Are Not Convincing.Joona Räsänen - 2016 - Bioethics 30 (9):656-662.
    Alberto Giubilini and Francesca Minerva's controversial article ‘After-Birth Abortion: Why Should the Baby Live?’ has received a lot of criticism since its publishing. Part of the recent criticism has been made by pro-life philosopher Christopher Kaczor, who argues against infanticide in his updated book ‘Ethics of Abortion’. Kaczor makes four arguments to show where Giubilini and Minerva's argument for permitting infanticide goes wrong. In this article I argue that Kaczor's arguments, and some similar arguments presented by other philosophers, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  9. Killing Fetuses and Killing Newborns.Ezio Di Nucci - 2013 - Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (5):19-20.
    The argument for the moral permissibility of killing newborns is a challenge to liberal positions on abortion because it can be considered a reductio of their defence of abortion. Here I defend the liberal stance on abortion by arguing that the argument for the moral permissibility of killing newborns on ground of the social, psychological and economic burden on the parents recently put forward by Giubilini and Minerva is not valid; this is because they fail to show that newborns cannot (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  10. The Ethics of Killing, an Amoral Enquiry.Cheng-Chih Tsai - 2015 - Applied Ethics Review 59:25-49.
    In ‘What Makes Killing Wrong?’ Sinnott-Armstrong and Miller make the bold claim that killing in itself is not wrong, what is wrong is totally-disabling. In ‘After-Birth Abortion: Why Should the Baby Live?’ Giubilini and Minerva argue for allowing infanticide. Both papers challenge the stigma commonly associated with killing, and emphasize that killing is not wrong at some margins of life. In this paper, we first generalize the above claims to the thesis that there is nothing morally wrong with killing (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11. Of Course the Baby Should Live: Against 'After-Birth Abortion'.Regina A. Rini - 2013 - Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (5):353-356.
    In a recent paper, Giubilini and Minerva argue for the moral permissibility of what they call ‘after-birth abortion’, or infanticide. Here I suggest that they actually employ a confusion of two distinct arguments: one relying on the purportedly identical moral status of a fetus and a newborn, and the second giving an independent argument for the denial of moral personhood to infants (independent of whatever one might say about fetuses). After distinguishing these arguments, I suggest that neither one is (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  12.  47
    The Signal Functions of Early Infant Crying.Joseph Soltis - 2004 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (4):443-458.
    In this article I evaluate recent attempts to illuminate the human infant cry from an evolutionary perspective. Infants are born into an uncertain parenting environment, which can range from indulgent care of offspring to infanticide. Infant cries are in large part adaptations that maintain proximity to and elicit care from caregivers. Although there is not strong evidence for acoustically distinct cry types, infant cries may function as a graded signal. During pain-induced autonomic nervous system arousal, for example, neural input (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   11 citations  
  13. Killing Humans and Killing Animals.Peter Singer - 1979 - Inquiry : An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 22 (1-4):145 – 156.
    It is one thing to say that the suffering of non-human animals ought to be considered equally with the like suffering of humans; quite another to decide how the wrongness of killing non-human animals compares with the wrongness of killing human beings. It is argued that while species makes no difference to the wrongness of killing, the possession of certain capacities, in particular the capacity to see oneself as a distinct entity with a future, does. It is claimed, however, that (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   12 citations  
  14. The Moral Significance of Birth.Mary Anne Warren - 1989 - Hypatia 4 (3):46 - 65.
    Does birth make a difference to the moral rights of the fetus/infant? Should it make a difference to its legal rights? Most contemporary philosophers believe that birth cannot make a difference to moral rights. If this is true, then it becomes difficult to justify either a moral or a legal distinction between late abortion and infanticide. I argue that the view that birth is irrelevant to moral rights rests upon two highly questionable assumptions about the theoretical foundations of moral (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   10 citations  
  15. Sex Selection and the Procreative Liberty Framework.Inmaculada de Melo-Martín - 2013 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 23 (1):1-18.
    Although surprising to some proponents of sex selection for non-medical reasons (Dahl 2005), a considerable amount of critical debate has been raised by this practice (Blyth, Frith, and Crawshaw 2008; Dawson and Trounson 1996; Dickens 2002; Harris 2005; Heyd 2003; Holm 2004; Macklin 2010; Malpani 2002; McDougall 2005; Purdy 2007; Seavilleklein and Sherwin 2007; Steinbock 2002; Strange and Chadwick 2010; Wilkinson 2008). While abortion or infanticide has long been used as means of sex selection, a new technology—preimplantation genetic diagnosis (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  16.  96
    The Moral Significance of Birth.José Luis Bermúdez - 1996 - Ethics 106 (2):378 - 403.
    The author challenges the view that birth cannot be a morally relevant fact in the process of development from zygote to child. He reviews specific arguments against giving any moral significance to the fact of birth. Drawing on recent work in developmental psychology, he contends that the lives of neonates can have a level of self-consciousness that confers moral significance but can only be possessed after birth. He shows that the position he has argued for provides a framework within which (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   11 citations  
  17.  8
    Beyond Infanticide: How Psychological Accounts of Persons Can Justify Harming Infants.Daniel Rodger, Bruce P. Blackshaw & Calum Miller - forthcoming - The New Bioethics:1-16.
    It is commonly argued that a serious right to life is grounded only in actual, relatively advanced psychological capacities a being has acquired. The moral permissibility of abortion is frequently argued for on these grounds. Increasingly it is being argued that such accounts also entail the permissibility of infanticide, with several proponents of these theories accepting this consequence. We show, however, that these accounts imply the permissibility of even more unpalatable acts than infanticide performed on infants: organ harvesting, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18.  95
    Consciousness and the Moral Permissibility of Infanticide.Nicole Hassoun & Uriah Kriegel - 2008 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 25 (1):45–55.
    In this paper, we present a conditional argument for the moral permissibility of some kinds of infanticide. The argument is based on a certain view of consciousness and the claim that there is an intimate connection between consciousness and infanticide. In bare outline, the argument is this: it is impermissible to intentionally kill a creature only if the creature is conscious; it is reasonable to believe that there is some time at which human infants are conscious; therefore, it (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  19. Infanticide.Jeff McMahan - 2007 - Utilitas 19 (2):131-159.
    It is sometimes suggested that if a moral theory implies that infanticide can sometimes be permissible, that is sufficient to discredit the theory. I argue in this article that the common-sense belief that infanticide is wrong, and perhaps even worse than the killing of an adult, is challenged not so much by theoretical considerations as by common-sense beliefs about abortion, the killing of non-human animals, and so on. Because there are no intrinsic differences between premature infants and viable (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  20.  31
    Sex, Abortion, and Infanticide: The Gulf Between the Secular and the Divine.Mark J. Cherry - 2011 - Christian Bioethics 17 (1):25-46.
    This paper critically explores key aspects of the gulf between traditional Christian bioethics and the secular moral reflections that dominate contemporary bioethics. For example, in contrast to traditional Christian morality, the established secular bioethics judges extramarital sex acts among consenting persons, whether of the same or different sexes, as at least morally permissible, affirms sexual freedom for children to develop their own sexual identity, and holds the easy availability of abortion and infanticide as central to the liberty interests of (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  21. Ethics Beyond Moral Theory.Timothy Chappell - 2009 - Philosophical Investigations 32 (3):206-243.
    I develop an anti-theory view of ethics. Moral theory (Kantian, utilitarian, virtue ethical, etc.) is the dominant approach to ethics among academic philosophers. But moral theory's hunt for a single Master Factor (utility, universalisability, virtue . . .) is implausibly systematising and reductionist. Perhaps scientism drives the approach? But good science always insists on respect for the data, even messy data: I criticise Singer's remarks on infanticide as a clear instance of moral theory failing to respect the data of (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  22.  11
    Abortion and Infanticide.Nancy Davis & Michael Tooley - 1985 - Philosophical Review 94 (3):436.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   14 citations  
  23.  12
    A Dubious Defense of ‘After‐Birth Abortion’: A Reply to Räsänen.Christopher Kaczor - 2018 - Bioethics 32 (2):132-137.
    Scholars have offered various critiques of Alberto Giubilini and Francesca Minerva's controversial article, ‘After-birth abortion: Why should the baby live?’ My book The Ethics of Abortion: Women's Rights, Human Life, and the Question of Justice presents four such critiques. First, Giubilini and Minerva argue from the deeply controversial to the even more controversial. Second, they presuppose a false view of personal identity called body-self dualism. Third, their view cannot secure human equality. And fourth, their account of harm cannot account for (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24. The Moral Difference Between Infanticide and Abortion: A Response to Robert Card.Mary Anne Warren - 2000 - Bioethics 14 (4):352–359.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  25.  15
    Chimpanzees’ Bystander Reactions to Infanticide.Claudia Rudolf von Rohr, Carel P. van Schaik, Alexandra Kissling & Judith M. Burkart - 2015 - Human Nature 26 (2):143-160.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  26.  6
    Why Arguments Against Infanticide Remain Convincing: A Reply to Räsänen.Daniel Rodger, Bruce P. Blackshaw & Clinton Wilcox - 2018 - Bioethics 32 (3):215-219.
    In ‘Pro-life arguments against infanticide and why they are not convincing’ Joona Räsänen argues that Christopher Kaczor's objections to Giubilini and Minerva's position on infanticide are not persuasive. We argue that Räsänen's criticism is largely misplaced, and that he has not engaged with Kaczor's strongest arguments against infanticide. We reply to each of Räsänen's criticisms, drawing on the full range of Kaczor's arguments, as well as adding some of our own.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27. Leo Strauss and Anglo-American Democracy: A Conservative Critique.Grant N. Havers - 2013 - Northern Illinois University Press.
    In this original new study, Grant Havers critically interprets Leo Strauss’s political philosophy from a conservative perspective. Most mainstream readers of Strauss have either condemned him from the Left as an extreme right-wing opponent of liberal democracy or celebrated him from the Right as a traditional defender of Western civilization. Rejecting both of these portrayals, Havers shifts the debate beyond the conventional parameters of our age. He persuasively shows that Strauss was neither a man of the Far Right nor a (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  28.  15
    Dowry and Public Policy in Contemporary India.Mary K. Shenk - 2007 - Human Nature 18 (3):242-263.
    In modern Indian political discourse the custom of dowry is often represented as the cause of serious social problems, including the neglect of daughters, sex-selective abortion, female infanticide, and the harassment, abuse, and murder of brides. Attempts to deal with these problems through legislative prohibition of dowry, however, have resulted in virtually no diminution of either dowry or violence against women. In contrast, radically different interpretations of dowry can be found in the literatures of structural-functionalist anthropology, economics, and human (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  29.  1
    Consciousness and the Moral Permissibility of Infanticide 1.Nicole Hassoun - 2008 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 25 (1):45-55.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  30.  33
    Infanticide and Moral Consistency.J. McMahan - 2013 - Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (5):273-280.
    The aim of this essay is to show that there are no easy options for those who are disturbed by the suggestion that infanticide may on occasion be morally permissible. The belief that infanticide is always wrong is doubtfully compatible with a range of widely shared moral beliefs that underlie various commonly accepted practices. Any set of beliefs about the morality of abortion, infanticide and the killing of animals that is internally consistent and even minimally credible will (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  31.  18
    Why Sex Selection Should Be Legal.David McCarthy - 2001 - Journal of Medical Ethics 27 (5):302-307.
    Reliable medically assisted sex selection which does not involve abortion or infanticide has recently become available, and has been used for non-medical reasons. This raises questions about the morality of sex selection for non-medical reasons. But reasonable people continue to disagree about the answers to these questions. So another set of questions is about what the law should be on medically assisted sex selection for non-medical reasons in the face of reasonable disagreement about the morality of sex selection. This (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  32. Infanticide and the Liberal View on Abortion.Robert F. Card - 2000 - Bioethics 14 (4):340–351.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  33. Time-Relative Interests and Abortion.S. Liao - 2007 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 4 (2):242-256.
    The concept of a time-relative interest is introduced by Jeff McMahan to solve certain puzzles about the badness of death. Some people (e.g. McMahan and David DeGrazia) believe that this concept can also be used to show that abortion is permissible. In this paper, I first argue that if the Time-Relative Interest Account permits abortion, then it would also permit infanticide.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  34. Infanticide and the Value of Life.A. G. M. Campbell - 1979 - Journal of Medical Ethics 5 (3):150-150.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35. Taking Life: Humans.Peter Singer - unknown
    In dealing with an objection to the view of abortion presented in Chapter 6, we have already looked beyond abortion to infanticide. In so doing we will have confirmed the suspicion of supporters of the sanctity of human life that once abortion is accepted, euthanasia lurks around the next comer - and for them, euthanasia is an unequivocal evil. It has, they point out, been rejected by doctors since the fifth century B.C., when physicians first took the Oath of (...)
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  36.  13
    Abortion, Infanticide and Allowing Babies to Die, 40 Years On.Julian Savulescu - 2013 - Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (5):257-259.
    In January 2012, the Journal of Medical Ethics published online Giubilini and Minerva's paper, ‘After-birth abortion. Why should the baby live?’.1 The Journal publishes articles based on the quality of their argument, their contribution to the existing literature, and relevance to current medicine. This article met those criteria. It created unprecedented global outrage for a paper published in an academic medical ethics journal. In this special issue of the Journal, Giubilini and Minerva's paper comes to print along with 31 articles (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  37.  13
    The Performativity of Personhood.Catherine Mills - 2013 - Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (5):325-325.
    In debates on infanticide, including the recent defence of so-called ‘after-birth abortion’, philosophers generally treat the term ‘the person’ as descriptive, such that statements claiming that something is a person can be considered true or false, depending on the characteristics of that thing. This obscures important aspects of its usage. J L Austen identified a subset of speech acts as performative, in that they do things in their very declaration or utterance. They do not simply describe states of affairs (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  38.  11
    Infanticide and Madness.Robert P. George - 2013 - Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (5):299-301.
    I am, of course, aware that infanticide was accepted and practiced in ancient Greece and Rome, and is still practiced in places like India and China today; just as I am aware that slavery was accepted and practiced in ancient Greece and Rome , and is still practiced in some places today. But if philosophers, no matter how sophisticated, were to step forward today to argue that slavery is morally acceptable , I would call that madness.Of course, the ‘madness’ (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  39.  25
    Lifelines: Life Beyond the Gene.Steven P. R. Rose - 2003 - Oxford University Press.
    In Life Beyond the Gene, Steven Rose offers a theory of life which insists that we as humans -- and indeed all living creatures -- create our own futures, though in circumstances not of our own choosing. Placing the organism at the center of life, Rose confronts the ideology of reductionism and ultra-Darwinism, with its insistence that all aspects of human life from sexual preference to infanticide, political orientation to violence, male domination to alcoholism, are in our genes and (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  40. Self-Ownership, Abortion and Infanticide.E. F. Paul & J. Paul - 1979 - Journal of Medical Ethics 5 (3):133-138.
    Doctors have been placed in an anomalous position by abortion laws which sanction the termination of a fetus while in a woman's womb, yet call it murder when a physician attempts to end the life of a fetus which has somehow survived such a procedure. This predicament, the doctors' dilemma, can be resolved by adopting a strategy which posits the right to ownership of one's own body for human beings. Such an approach will generate a consistent policy prescription, one that (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  41. Should Policy Ethics Come in Two Colours: Green or White?Malcolm Oswald - 2013 - Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (5):312-315.
    When writing about policy, do you think in green or white? If not, I recommend that you do. I suggest that writers and journal editors should explicitly label every policy ethics paper either ‘green’ or ‘white’. A green paper is an unconstrained exploration of a policy question. The controversial ‘After-birth abortion’ paper is an example. Had it been labelled as ‘green’, readers could have understood what Giubilini and Minerva explained later: that it was a discussion of philosophical ideas, and not (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  42.  88
    Abortion, Infanticide, and the Changing Grounds of the Wrongness of Killing: Reply to Don Marquis's "Reiman on Abortion".Jeffrey Reiman - 1998 - Journal of Social Philosophy 29 (2):168-174.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  43. Abortion and Infanticide By Michael Tooley Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1983, 441 Pp., £20.00. [REVIEW]Philip E. Devine - 1984 - Philosophy 59 (230):545-.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  44.  4
    Killing and Saving: Abortion, Hunger, and War.John P. J. R. Reeder - 1996 - Pennsylvania State University Press.
    Contrary to the views of Alasdair MacIntyre and others who assert that modern Western morality is in disarray, torn by incommensurable moral views, John Reeder believes that there is much agreement about taking and saving lives. Many people might, in fact, agree on the various circumstances in which the death of a person constitutes a violation of the right to life, or that people have a right to our help, especially a right to life-saving aid. In_ Killing and Saving_, Reeder (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  45.  1
    Sex, Abortion, and Infanticide: The Gulf Between the Secular and the Divine: Articles.Mark J. Cherry - 2011 - Christian Bioethics 17 (1):25-46.
    This paper critically explores key aspects of the gulf between traditional Christian bioethics and the secular moral reflections that dominate contemporary bioethics. For example, in contrast to traditional Christian morality, the established secular bioethics judges extramarital sex acts among consenting persons, whether of the same or different sexes, as at least morally permissible, affirms sexual freedom for children to develop their own sexual identity, and holds the easy availability of abortion and infanticide as central to the liberty interests of (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  46. From Adam Smith to Darwin.Eric S. Schliesser - unknown
    In this paper I call attention to Adam Smith’s 'Considerations Concerning the First Formation of Languages' in order to facilitate understanding Adam Smith from a Darwinian perspective. By ‘Darwinian’ I mean a position that explains differential selection over time through natural mechanisms. First, I argue that right near the start of Wealth of Nations Smith signals that human nature has probably evolved over a very long amount of time. Second, I connect this evidence with an infamous passage on infanticide (...)
    Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  47.  71
    Abortion, Infanticide, and the Asymmetric Value of Human Life.Jeffrey Reiman - 1996 - Journal of Social Philosophy 27 (3):181-200.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  48.  62
    Aristotle on Abortion and Infanticide.Mathew Lu - 2013 - International Philosophical Quarterly 53 (1):47-62.
    Some recent commentators have thought that, if updated with the findings of modern embryology, Aristotle’s views on abortion would yield a pro-life conclusion. On the basis of a careful reading of the relevant passage from Politics VII, I argue that the matter is more complicated than simply replacing his defective empirical embryological claims with our more accurate ones. Since Aristotle’s view on abortion was shaped not only by a defective embryology but also by an acceptance of the classical Greek practice (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  49.  94
    Abortion, Contraception, Infanticide.Philip E. Devine - 1983 - Philosophy 58 (226):513 - 520.
  50.  47
    On Kant, Infanticide, and Finding Oneself in a State of Nature.Jennifer K. Uleman - 2000 - Zeitschrift für Philosophische Forschung 54 (2):173 - 195.
    This paper takes up Kant's argument that infanticides - specifically unwed women who kill their illegitimate children at birth - should not be tried for murder or receive the death penalty. Kant suggests that their actions are committed in a 'state of nature' outside the law's jurisdiction. I aim here both to defend Kant's reasoning against charges that it is cruel , as well as to understand what Kant was thinking in introducing such a 'temporary' state of nature. I claim (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
1 — 50 / 174