Works by Churchland, Patricia S. (exact spelling)

48 found
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  1. Braintrust: What Neuroscience Tells Us About Morality.Patricia S. Churchland - 2011 - Princeton University Press.
    What is morality? Where does it come from? And why do most of us heed its call most of the time? In Braintrust, neurophilosophy pioneer Patricia Churchland argues that morality originates in the biology of the brain. She describes the "neurobiological platform of bonding" that, modified by evolutionary pressures and cultural values, has led to human styles of moral behavior. The result is a provocative genealogy of morals that asks us to reevaluate the priority given to religion, absolute rules, and (...)
     
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  2. Reduction and the Neurobiological Basis of Consciousness.Patricia S. Churchland - 1988 - In Anthony J. Marcel & E. Bisiach (eds.), Consciousness in Contemporary Science. Oxford University Press.
  3. Consciousness: The Transmutation of a Concept.Patricia S. Churchland - 1983 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 64 (January):80-95.
     
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  4. A Critique of Pure Vision.Patricia S. Churchland, V. S. Ramachandran & Terrence J. Sejnowski - 1993 - In Christof Koch & Joel L. David (eds.), Large-scale neuronal theories of the brain. MIT Press. pp. 23.
    Anydomainofscientificresearchhasitssustainingorthodoxy. Thatis, research on a problem, whether in astronomy, physics, or biology, is con- ducted against a backdrop of broadly shared assumptions. It is these as- sumptionsthatguideinquiryandprovidethecanonofwhatisreasonable-- of what "makes sense." And it is these shared assumptions that constitute a framework for the interpretation of research results. Research on the problem of how we see is likewise sustained by broadly shared assump- tions, where the current orthodoxy embraces the very general idea that the business of the visual system is to (...)
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  5. Stalking the Wild Epistemic Engine.Paul M. Churchland & Patricia S. Churchland - 1983 - Noûs 17 (1):5-18.
  6. Could a Machine Think?Paul M. Churchland & Patricia S. Churchland - 1990 - Scientific American 262 (1):32-37.
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  7. Control: Conscious and Otherwise.Christopher L. Suhler & Patricia S. Churchland - 2009 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 13 (8):341-347.
  8. The Neural Mechanisms of Moral Cognition: A Multiple-Aspect Approach to Moral Judgment and Decision-Making. [REVIEW]William D. Casebeer & Patricia S. Churchland - 2003 - Biology and Philosophy 18 (1):169-194.
    We critically review themushrooming literature addressing the neuralmechanisms of moral cognition (NMMC), reachingthe following broad conclusions: (1) researchmainly focuses on three inter-relatedcategories: the moral emotions, moral socialcognition, and abstract moral reasoning. (2)Research varies in terms of whether it deploysecologically valid or experimentallysimplified conceptions of moral cognition. Themore ecologically valid the experimentalregime, the broader the brain areas involved.(3) Much of the research depends on simplifyingassumptions about the domain of moral reasoningthat are motivated by the need to makeexperimental progress. This is a (...)
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  9. Can Neurobiology Teach Us Anything About Consciousness?Patricia S. Churchland - 1994 - Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 67 (4):23-40.
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    Content: Semantic and Information-Theoretic.Paul M. Churchland & Patricia S. Churchland - 1983 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 6 (1):67-68.
  11. Intertheoretic Reduction: A Neuroscientist's Field Guide.Paul M. Churchland & Patricia S. Churchland - 1992 - In Y. Christen & P. S. Churchland (eds.), Neurophilosophy and Alzheimer's Disease. Cambridge: Springer Verlag. pp. 18--29.
  12. Neural Representation and Neural Computation.Patricia S. Churchland & Terrence J. Sejnowski - 1989 - In L. Nadel (ed.), Philosophical Perspectives. MIT Press. pp. 343-382.
  13. Filling In: Why Dennett is Wrong.Patricia S. Churchland & Vilayanur S. Ramachandran - 1993 - In B. Dahlbom (ed.), Dennett and His Critics. Blackwell.
     
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  14. Moral Decision-Making and the Brain.Patricia S. Churchland - 2005 - In Judy Illes (ed.), Neuroethics: Defining the Issues in Theory, Practice, and Policy. Oxford University Press.
     
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  15.  2
    Index.Patricia S. Churchland - 2018 - In Braintrust: What Neuroscience Tells Us About Morality. Princeton University Press. pp. 261-276.
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  16. Recent Work on Consciousness: Philosophical, Theoretical, and Empirical.Paul M. Churchland & Patricia S. Churchland - 2003 - In Naoyuki Osaka (ed.), Neural Basis of Consciousness. Amsterdam: John Benjamins. pp. 49--123.
  17. Neural Worlds and Real Worlds.Patricia S. Churchland & Paul M. Churchland - manuscript
    States of the brain represent states of the world. A puzzle arises when one learns that at least some of the mind/brain’s internal representations, such as a sensation of heat or a sensation of red, do not genuinely resemble the external realities they allegedly represent: the mean kinetic energy of the molecules of the substance felt (temperature) and the mean electromagnetic reflectance profile of the seen object (color). The historical response has been to declare a distinction between objectively real properties, (...)
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  18.  86
    Mind-Brain Reduction: New Light From Philosophy of Science.Patricia S. Churchland - 1982 - Neuroscience 7:1041-7.
  19. Consciousness and the Neurosciences: Philosophical and Theoretical Issues.Ilya B. Farber & Patricia S. Churchland - 1995 - In Michael S. Gazzaniga (ed.), The Cognitive Neurosciences. MIT Press.
  20.  23
    The Co-Evolutionary Research Ideology.Patricia S. Churchland - 1993 - In Alvin Goldman (ed.), Readings in Philosophy and Cognitive Science. Cambridge: MIT Press.
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  21.  37
    The Neurobiological Platform for Moral Values.Patricia S. Churchland - 2015 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 76:97-110.
    What we humans call ethics or morality depends on four interlocking brain processes: caring. Learning local social practices and the ways of others – by positive and negative reinforcement, by imitation, by trial and error, by various kinds of conditioning, and by analogy. Recognition of others' psychological states. Problem-solving in a social context. These four broad capacities are not unique to humans, but are probably uniquely developed in human brains by virtue of the expansion of the prefrontal cortex.1.
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  22.  35
    Human Dignity From a Neurophilosophical Perspective.Patricia S. Churchland - 2008 - In Adam Schulman (ed.), Human Dignity and Bioethics: Essays Commissioned by the President's Council on Bioethics. [President's Council on Bioethics.
  23. Do We Propose to Eliminate Consciousness?Patricia S. Churchland - 1996 - In Robert N. McCauley (ed.), The Churchlands and Their Critics. Blackwell. pp. 297--300.
     
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  24.  6
    Replies to Reviews of Psychology's Place in the Science of the Mind/Brain.Patricia S. Churchland - 1988 - Biology and Philosophy 3 (3):393-402.
  25.  4
    Acknowledgments.Patricia S. Churchland - 2018 - In Braintrust: What Neuroscience Tells Us About Morality. Princeton University Press. pp. 259-260.
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  26. A Neuroscientist's Field Guide In W. Bechtel, P. Mandik, J. Mundale & RS Stufflebeam.Paul M. Churchland & Patricia S. Churchland - 2001 - In William P. Bechtel, Pete Mandik, Jennifer Mundale & Robert S. Stufflebeam (eds.), Philosophy and the Neurosciences: A Reader. Blackwell. pp. 419--430.
     
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  27.  2
    Bibliography.Patricia S. Churchland - 2018 - In Braintrust: What Neuroscience Tells Us About Morality. Princeton University Press. pp. 235-258.
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  28.  3
    2. Brain-Based Values.Patricia S. Churchland - 2018 - In Braintrust: What Neuroscience Tells Us About Morality. Princeton University Press. pp. 12-26.
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  29.  3
    Contents.Patricia S. Churchland - 2018 - In Braintrust: What Neuroscience Tells Us About Morality. Princeton University Press.
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  30.  3
    4. Cooperating and Trusting.Patricia S. Churchland - 2018 - In Braintrust: What Neuroscience Tells Us About Morality. Princeton University Press. pp. 63-94.
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  31.  7
    3. Caring and Caring For.Patricia S. Churchland - 2018 - In Braintrust: What Neuroscience Tells Us About Morality. Princeton University Press. pp. 27-62.
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  32. Discussion: The Timing of Sensations: Reply to Libet.Patricia S. Churchland - 1981 - Philosophy of Science 48 (September):492-497.
  33.  1
    Frontmatter.Patricia S. Churchland - 2018 - In Braintrust: What Neuroscience Tells Us About Morality. Princeton University Press.
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  34.  2
    1. Introduction.Patricia S. Churchland - 2018 - In Braintrust: What Neuroscience Tells Us About Morality. Princeton University Press. pp. 1-11.
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  35.  1
    Illustrations.Patricia S. Churchland - 2018 - In Braintrust: What Neuroscience Tells Us About Morality. Princeton University Press.
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  36. McCauley's Demand for a Co-Level Competitor.Paul M. Churchland & Patricia S. Churchland - 2001 - In William P. Bechtel, Pete Mandik, Jennifer Mundale & Robert S. Stufflebeam (eds.), Philosophy and the Neurosciences: A Reader. Blackwell. pp. 457--465.
     
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  37.  1
    Notes.Patricia S. Churchland - 2018 - In Braintrust: What Neuroscience Tells Us About Morality. Princeton University Press. pp. 205-234.
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  38.  1
    7. Not as a Rule.Patricia S. Churchland - 2018 - In Braintrust: What Neuroscience Tells Us About Morality. Princeton University Press. pp. 163-190.
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  39.  7
    5. Networking: Genes, Brains, and Behavior.Patricia S. Churchland - 2018 - In Braintrust: What Neuroscience Tells Us About Morality. Princeton University Press. pp. 95-117.
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  40. Preface to the Princeton Science Library Edition.Patricia S. Churchland - 2018 - In Braintrust: What Neuroscience Tells Us About Morality. Princeton University Press.
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  41.  4
    8. Religion and Morality.Patricia S. Churchland - 2018 - In Braintrust: What Neuroscience Tells Us About Morality. Princeton University Press. pp. 191-204.
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  42. Replies to Comments to Symposium on Patricia Smith Churchland's Neurophilosophy.Patricia S. Churchland - 1986 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 29 (June):241-272.
  43.  3
    Reviews-On the Contrary: Critical Essays 1987-1997.Paul M. Churchland, Patricia S. Churchland & Alice Drewery - 2000 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 51 (3):507-512.
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  44.  7
    6. Skills for a Social Life.Patricia S. Churchland - 2018 - In Braintrust: What Neuroscience Tells Us About Morality. Princeton University Press. pp. 118-162.
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  45. The View From Here: The Nonsymbolic Structure of Spatial Representation.Patricia S. Churchland, Ilya B. Farber & Will Peterman - 2001 - In Joao Branquinho (ed.), The Foundations of Cognitive Science. Oxford: Clarendon Press.
  46. What Should We Expect From a Theory of Consciousness?Patricia S. Churchland - 1998 - In H. Jasper, L. Descarries, V. Castellucci & S. Rossignol (eds.), Consciousness: At the Frontiers of Neuroscience. Lippincott-Raven. pp. 19-32.
    Within the domain of philosophy, it is not unusual to hear the claim that most questions about the nature of consciousness are essentially and absolutely beyond the scope of science, no matter how science may develop in the twenty-first century. Some things, it is pointed out, we shall never _ever_ understand, and consciousness is one of them (Vendler 1994, Swinburne 1994, McGinn 1989, Nagel 1994, Warner 1994). One line of reasoning assumes that consciousness is the manifestation of a distinctly nonphysical (...)
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  47. Computation and the Brain.Rick Grush & Patricia S. Churchland - 1998 - In Robert A. Wilson & Frank F. Keil (eds.), Mit Encyclopedia of the Cognitive Sciences (Mitecs). MIT Press.
    Two very different insights motivate characterizing the brain as a computer. One depends on mathematical theory that defines computability in a highly abstract sense. Here the foundational idea is that of a Turing machine. Not an actual machine, the Turing machine is really a conceptual way of making the point that any well-defined function could be executed, step by step, according to simple 'if-you-are-in-state-P-and-have-input-Q-then-do-R' rules, given enough time (maybe infinite time) [see COMPUTATION]. Insofar as the brain is a device whose (...)
     
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  48.  14
    My Behavior Made Me Do It: The Uncaused Cause of Teleological Behaviorism.Jordan Hughes & Patricia S. Churchland - 1995 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (1):130-131.
    Toward a neurobiologically grounded approach to explaining self-control we discuss the case of a patient with a bilateral lesion in frontal ventromedial cortex. Patients with such lesions display a marked deficit in social decision making. Compared with an account that examines the causal antecedents of self-control, Rachlin's behaviorist approach seems lacking in explanatory strength.
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