Works by Robins, Sarah (exact spelling)

17 found
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  1. Beyond the causal theory? Fifty years after Martin and Deutscher.Kourken Michaelian & Sarah Robins - 2018 - In Kourken Michaelian, Dorothea Debus & Denis Perrin (eds.), New Directions in the Philosophy of Memory. Routledge. pp. 13-32.
    It is natural to think of remembering in terms of causation: I can recall a recent dinner with a friend because I experienced that dinner. Some fifty years ago, Martin and Deutscher (1966) turned this basic thought into a full-fledged theory of memory, a theory that came to dominate the landscape in the philosophy of memory. Remembering, Martin and Deutscher argue, requires the existence of a specific sort of causal connection between the rememberer's original experience of an event and his (...)
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  2. Defending Discontinuism, Naturally.Sarah Robins - 2020 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 11 (2):469-486.
    The more interest philosophers take in memory, the less agreement there is that memory exists—or more precisely, that remembering is a distinct psychological kind or mental state. Concerns about memory’s distinctiveness are triggered by observations of its similarity to imagination. The ensuing debate is cast as one between discontinuism and continuism. The landscape of debate is set such that any extensive engagement with empirical research into episodic memory places one on the side of continuism. Discontinuists concerns are portrayed as almost (...)
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  3. Representing the past: memory traces and the causal theory of memory.Sarah Robins - 2016 - Philosophical Studies 173 (11):2993-3013.
    According to the Causal Theory of Memory, remembering a particular past event requires a causal connection between that event and its subsequent representation in memory, specifically, a connection sustained by a memory trace. The CTM is the default view of memory in contemporary philosophy, but debates persist over what the involved memory traces must be like. Martin and Deutscher argued that the CTM required memory traces to be structural analogues of past events. Bernecker and Michaelian, contemporary CTM proponents, reject structural (...)
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  4.  53
    Mnemonic Confabulation.Sarah Robins - 2020 - Topoi 39 (1):121-132.
    Clinical use of the term “confabulation” began as a reference to false memories in dementia patients. The term has remained in circulation since, which belies shifts in its definition and scope over time. “Confabulation” now describes a range of disorders, deficits, and anomalous behaviors. The increasingly wide and varied use of this term has prompted many to ask: what is confabulation? In recent years, many have offered answers to this question. As a general rule, recent accounts are accounts of broad (...)
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  5.  86
    The Role of Memory Science in the Philosophy of Memory.Sarah Robins - 2022 - Philosophy Compass 17 (10):e12880.
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  6.  80
    Episodic Memory, Simulated Future Planning, and their Evolution.Armin W. Schulz & Sarah Robins - 2023 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 14 (3):811-832.
    The pressures that led to the evolution of episodic memory have recently seen much discussion, but a fully satisfactory account of them is still lacking. We seek to make progress in this debate by taking a step backward, identifying four possible ways that episodic memory could evolve in relation to simulationist future planning—a similar and seemingly related ability. After distinguishing each of these possibilities, the paper critically discusses existing accounts of the evolution of episodic memory. It then presents a novel (...)
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  7.  19
    Why have “revolutionary” tools found purchase in memory science?David Colaço & Sarah Robins - 2023 - Philosophy and the Mind Sciences 4.
    The study of the neural basis of memory has advanced over the past decade. A key contributor to this memory “renaissance” has been new tools. On its face, this matches what might be described as a neuroscientific revolution stemming from the development of tools, where this revolution is largely independent of theory. In this paper, we challenge this tool revolution account by focusing on a problem that arises in applying it to this “renaissance”: it is centered around memory, but the (...)
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  8.  37
    The failures of functionalism.Sarah Robins - 2021 - Estudios de Filosofía (Universidad de Antioquia) 64:201-222.
    In Memory: A Self-Referential Account, Fernández offers a functionalist account of the metaphysics of memory, which is portrayed as presenting significant advantages over causal and narrative theories of memory. In this paper, I present a series of challenges for Fernández’s functionalism. There are issues with both the particulars of the account and the use of functionalism more generally. First, in characterizing the mnemonic role of episodic remembering, Fernández fails to make clear how the mental image type that plays this role (...)
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  9.  17
    In Defense of Vasubandhu's Approach to Episodic Phenomenology.Sarah Robins - 2017 - Australasian Philosophical Review 1 (4):416-419.
    ABSTRACTGaneri [2018] explores three Buddhist approaches to episodic memory and concludes in favor of Buddhaghosa's attentional account. When comparing it to Vasubandhu's, Ganeri argues that Buddhaghosa's is preferable because it does not over-intellectualize episodic memory. In my commentary, I argue that the intellectualism of Vasubandhu's approach makes it both a more plausible account of episodic memory and a more successful strategy for addressing the precarious role of the self in this form of memory.
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  10. The Routledge Companion to Philosophy of Psychology.Sarah Robins, John Symons & Paco Calvo (eds.) - 2009 - New York, NY: Routledge.
    _The Routledge Companion to Philosophy of Psychology, Second Edition_ is an invaluable guide and major reference source to the major topics, problems, concepts and debates in philosophy of psychology and is the first companion of its kind. A team of renowned international contributors provide forty-nine chapters organised into six clear parts: Historical background to Philosophy of Psychology Psychological Explanation Cognition and Representation The biological basis of psychology Perceptual Experience Personhood. _The Companion_ covers key topics such as the origins of experimental (...)
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  11.  8
    Student Voices on GPT-3, Writing Assignments, and the Future College Classroom.Bada Kim, Sarah Robins & Jihui Huang - 2024 - Teaching Philosophy 47 (2):213-231.
    This paper presents a summary and discussion of an assignment that asked students about the impact of Large Language Models on their college education. Our analysis summarizes students’ perception of GPT-3, categorizes their proposals for modifying college courses, and identifies their stated values about their college education. Furthermore, this analysis provides a baseline for tracking students’ attitudes toward LLMs and contributes to the conversation on student perceptions of the relationship between writing and philosophy.
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  12.  21
    Cueing involuntary memory.Sarah Robins & Maziyar Afifi - 2023 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 46:e374.
    We raise two points about cues, which complicate Barzykowski and Moulin's attempt at a unified model of memory retrieval. First, cues operate differently in voluntary and involuntary contexts. Second, voluntary and involuntary memory can be interconnected, as in cases of chaining.
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  13.  29
    Confabulation and epistemic authority.Sarah Robins - 2018 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 41.
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  14.  33
    Letter knowledge in parent–child conversations: differences between families differing in socio-economic status.Sarah Robins, Dina Ghosh, Nicole Rosales & Rebecca Treiman - unknown
    When formal literacy instruction begins, around the age of 5 or 6, children from families low in socioeconomic status tend to be less prepared than children from families of higher SES. The goal of our study is to explore one route through which SES may influence children's early literacy skills: informal conversations about letters. The study builds on previous studies of parent–child conversations that show how U. S. parents and their young children talk about writing and provide preliminary evidence about (...)
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  15.  52
    The Philosophy of Memory: Introduction.Ian O’Loughlin & Sarah Robins - 2018 - Essays in Philosophy 19 (2):174-177.
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  16.  62
    How We Remember: Brain Mechanisms of Episodic Memory.Sarah Robins - 2015 - Philosophical Psychology 28 (6):903-915.
  17.  10
    Mindreading and Tacit Knowledge.Sarah Robins - unknown
    This is the author's final draft. Copyright 2014 Elsevier.
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