Works by Wailoo, Keith (exact spelling)

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  1.  4
    Medicine, Culture, and Sickle Cell DiseaseDying in the City of the Blues: Sickle Cell Anemia and the Politics of Race and Health.Troy Duster & Keith Wailoo - 2002 - Hastings Center Report 32 (4):46.
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  2.  37
    Genetic Marker of Segregation: Sickle Cell Anemia, Thalassemia, and Racial Ideology in American Medical Writing 1920-1950.Keith Wailoo - 1996 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 18 (3):305 - 320.
    This paper focuses on sickle cell anemia and thalassemia as case studies of genetic disease in America. Before the 1950s, these two diseases were perceived by many physicians as closely related (indeed, by some, as indistinguishable). Sickle cell anemia was defined by most American physicians as a Mendelian dominant disorder specific to African-Americans. As such, it could be 'spread' by any individual parent 'carrier' through reproduction. This view of the disease fed into (and was supported by) prevalent social concerns about (...)
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  3.  12
    Thinking Through the Pain.Keith Wailoo - 2016 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 59 (2):253-262.
    While researching my 2001 book on sickle cell disease, I became aware of the politics of pain. In that malady—a painful disorder associated with African Americans and characterized by frequent infections and recurring painful “crises”—the politics of pain recognition and adequate relief intersect not only with drug concerns, but also with American racial politics. One cannot understand fully the history of sickle cell patients without understanding politics on two levels: the macropolitics of race in America and the micropolitics of medicinal (...)
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