Results for 'Michael S. Littleford'

(not author) ( search as author name )
1000+ found
Order:
  1. Michael S. Littleford and James R. Whitt, Giambattista Vico, Post-Mechanical Thought, And Contemporary Psychology Reviewed By. [REVIEW]Thomas Buford - 1989 - Philosophy in Review 9 (7):273-275.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2.  18
    Michael S. Littleford and James R. Whitt. "Giambattista Vico, Post-Mechanical Thought, and Contemporary Psychology". [REVIEW]Amedeo Giorgi - 1989 - New Vico Studies 7:122.
  3.  20
    Book Review Section 6. [REVIEW]Michael S. Littleford, William Hare, Dale L. Brubaker, Louise M. Berman, Lawrence M. Knolle, Raymond C. Carleton, James La Point, Edmonia W. Davidson, Joseph Michel, William H. Boyer, Carol Ann Moore, Walter Doyle, Paul Saettler, John P. Driscoll, Lane F. Birkel, Emma C. Johnson, Bernard Cleveland, Patricia J. R. Dahl, J. M. Lucas, Albert Montare & Lennart L. Kopra - 1974 - Educational Studies 5 (4):292-309.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4.  18
    Toward a Pragmatic Metaphysics: Comments on a Speculative Approach.Michael S. Littleford - 1993 - Man and World 26 (3):339-350.
  5.  4
    Women, Culture, and Morality.Michael S. Littleford - 1989 - Educational Theory 39 (3):273-280.
  6. Causation and Responsibility*: MICHAEL S. MOORE.Michael S. Moore - 1999 - Social Philosophy and Policy 16 (2):1-51.
    In various areas of Anglo-American law, legal liability turns on causation. In torts and contracts, we are each liable only for those harms we have caused by the actions that breach our legal duties. Such doctrines explicitly make causation an element of liability. In criminal law, sometimes the causal element for liability is equally explicit, as when a statute makes punishable any act that has “ caused … abuse to the child….” More often, the causal element in criminal liability is (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   21 citations  
  7. Choice, Character, and Excuse*: MICHAEL S. MOORE.Michael S. Moore - 1990 - Social Philosophy and Policy 7 (2):29-58.
    Freud justified his extensive theorizing about dreams by the observation that they were “the royal road” to something much more general: namely, our unconscious mental life. The current preoccupation with the theory of excuse in criminal law scholarship can be given a similar justification, for the excuses are the royal road to theories of responsibility generally. The thought is that if we understand why we excuse in certain situations but not others, we will have also gained a much more general (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   18 citations  
  8.  83
    Emotional Insight: The Epistemic Role of Emotional Experience.Michael S. Brady - 2013 - Oxford University Press.
    Michael S. Brady offers a new account of the role of emotions in our lives. He argues that emotional experiences do not give us information in the same way that perceptual experiences do. Instead, they serve our epistemic needs by capturing our attention and facilitating a reappraisal of the evaluative information that emotions themselves provide.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   64 citations  
  9.  48
    Suffering and Virtue.Michael S. Brady - 2018 - Oxford University Press.
    Suffering, in one form or another, is present in all of our lives. But why do we suffer? On one reading, this is a question about the causes of physical and emotional suffering. But on another, it is a question about whether suffering has a point or purpose or value. In this ground-breaking book, Michael Brady argues that suffering is vital for the development of virtue, and hence for us to live happy or flourishing lives. After presenting a distinctive (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  10. The Cognitive Neurosciences.Michael S. Gazzaniga (ed.) - 1995 - MIT Press.
  11.  95
    Causation and Responsibility: An Essay in Law, Morals, and Metaphysics.Michael S. Moore - 2009 - Oxford University Press.
    The concept of causation is fundamental to ascribing moral and legal responsibility for events. Yet the precise relationship between causation and responsibility remains unclear. This book clarifies that relationship through an analysis of the best accounts of causation in metaphysics, and a critique of the confusion in legal doctrine.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   38 citations  
  12. Placing Blame: A Theory of the Criminal Law.Michael S. Moore - 1997 - Oxford University Press.
    Originally published: Oxford: Clarendon, 1997.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   63 citations  
  13.  28
    The End of History and the Last Man.Michael S. Roth & Francis Fukuyama - 1993 - History and Theory 32 (2):188.
  14. R. S. Peters' Normative Conception of Education and Educational Aims.Michael S. Katz - 2009 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 43 (s1):97-108.
    This article aims to highlight why R. S. Peters' conceptual analysis of ‘education’ was such an important contribution to the normative field of philosophy of education. In the article, I do the following: 1) explicate Peters' conception of philosophy of education as a field of philosophy and explain his approach to the philosophical analysis of concepts; 2) emphasize several (normative) features of Peters' conception of education, while pointing to a couple of oversights; and 3) suggest how Peters' analysis might be (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  15.  7
    Darwin's Vertical Thinking: Mountains, Mobility, and the Imagination in 19th‐Century Geology.Michael S. Reidy - 2020 - Centaurus 62 (4):631-646.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  16. Mill's Moral Theory and the Problem of Preference Change.Michael S. McPherson - 1982 - Ethics 92 (2):252-273.
    A reconsideration of mill's theory of "higher pleasures," construed as a way of evaluating changes in preferences or character that result from changes in social environment. mill's account is criticized and partly reconstructed in light of modern preference theory, but viewed favorably as an illuminating attempt to address a fundamental problem in moral evaluation of social institutions. mill's advocacy of the higher pleasures is defended in particular against the charge that it is incompatible with his commitment to liberty.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  17.  2
    The Role of Emotion in Intellectual Virtue.Michael S. Brady - 2018 - In Heather Battaly (ed.), The Routledge Handbook of Virtue Epistemology. pp. 47-58.
    Emotions are important for virtue, both moral and intellectual. This chapter aims to explain the significance of emotion for intellectual virtue along two dimensions. The first claim is that epistemic emotions can motivate intellectual inquiry, and thereby constitute ways of 'being for' intellectual goods. As a result, such emotions can constitute the motivational components of intellectual virtue. The second claim is that other emotions, rather than motivating intellectual inquiry and questioning, instead play a vital role in the regulation and control (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18.  54
    John Martin Fischer's The Metaphysics of Free Will: An Essay on Control: Michael S. McKenna.Michael S. McKenna - 1997 - Legal Theory 3 (4):379-397.
    John Martin Fischer's The Metaphysics of Free Will is devoted to two major projects. First, Fischer defends the thesis that determinism is incompatible with a person's control over alternatives to the actual future. Second, Fischer defends the striking thesis that such control is not necessary for moral responsibility. This review essay examines Fischer's arguments for each thesis. Fischer's defense of the incompatibilist thesis is the most innovative to date, and I argue that his formulation restructures the free will debate. To (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19. The Irrationality of Recalcitrant Emotions.Michael S. Brady - 2009 - Philosophical Studies 145 (3):413 - 430.
    A recalcitrant emotion is one which conflicts with evaluative judgement. (A standard example is where someone is afraid of flying despite believing that it poses little or no danger.) The phenomenon of emotional recalcitrance raises an important problem for theories of emotion, namely to explain the sense in which recalcitrant emotions involve rational conflict. In this paper I argue that existing ‘neojudgementalist’ accounts of emotions fail to provide plausible explanations of the irrationality of recalcitrant emotions, and develop and defend my (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   33 citations  
  20.  76
    Painfulness, Desire, and the Euthyphro Dilemma.Michael S. Brady - 2018 - American Philosophical Quarterly 55 (3):239-250.
    The traditional desire view of painfulness maintains that pain sensations are painful because the subject desires that they not be occurring. A significant criticism of this view is that it apparently succumbs to a version of the Euthyphro Dilemma: the desire view, it is argued, is committed to an implausible answer to the question of why pain sensations are painful. In this paper, I explain and defend a new desire view, and one which can avoid the Euthyphro Dilemma. This new (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  21. Curiosity and the Value of Truth.Michael S. Brady - 2009 - In Adrian Haddock, Alan Millar & Duncan Pritchard (eds.), Epistemic Value. Oxford University Press. pp. 265-284.
    This chapter focuses on the question of whether true belief can have final value because it answers our ‘intellectual interest’ or ‘natural curiosity’. The idea is that sometimes we are interested in the truth on some issue not for any ulterior purpose, but simply because we are curious about that issue. It is argued that this approach fails to provide an adequate explanation of the final value of true belief, since there is an unbridgeable gap between our valuing the truth (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   33 citations  
  22. The Epistemic Life of Groups: Essays in the Epistemology of Collectives.Michael S. Brady & Miranda Fricker (eds.) - 2016 - Oxford University Press UK.
    Groups engage in epistemic activity all the time--whether it be the active collective inquiry of scientific research groups or crime detection units, or the evidential deliberations of tribunals and juries, or the informational efforts of the voting population in general--and yet in philosophy there is still relatively little epistemology of groups to help explore these epistemic practices and their various dimensions of social and philosophical significance. The aim of this book is to address this lack, by presenting original essays in (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  23.  29
    Toward a Theory of Human Memory: Data Structures and Access Processes.Michael S. Humphreys, Janet Wiles & Simon Dennis - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (4):655-667.
    Starting from Marr's ideas about levels of explanation, a theory of the data structures and access processes in human memory is demonstrated on 10 tasks. Functional characteristics of human memory are captured implementation-independently. Our theory generates a multidimensional task classification subsuming existing classifications such as the distinction between tasks that are implicit versus explicit, data driven versus conceptually driven, and simple associative versus higher order, providing a broad basis for new experiments. The formal language clarifies the binding problem in episodic (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   68 citations  
  24.  82
    Moore’s Truths About Causation and Responsibility: A Reply to Alexander and Ferzan. [REVIEW]Michael S. Moore - 2012 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 6 (3):445-462.
    In this response to the review of Moore, Causation and Responsibility, by Larry Alexander and Kimberly Ferzan, previously published in this journal, two issues are discussed. The first is whether causation, counterfactual dependence, moral blame, and culpability, are all scalar properties or relations, that is, matters of more-or-less rather than either-or. The second issue discussed is whether deontological moral obligation is best described as a prohibition against using another as a means, or rather, as a prohibition on an agent strongly (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  25.  7
    Different Ways to Cue a Coherent Memory System: A Theory for Episodic, Semantic, and Procedural Tasks.Michael S. Humphreys, John D. Bain & Ray Pike - 1989 - Psychological Review 96 (2):208-233.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   102 citations  
  26.  53
    Safety Vs. Sensitivity: Possible Worlds and the Law of Evidence.Michael S. Pardo - 2018 - Legal Theory 24 (1):50-75.
    ABSTRACTThis article defends the importance of epistemic safety for legal evidence. Drawing on discussions of sensitivity and safety in epistemology, the article explores how similar considerations apply to legal proof. In the legal context, sensitivity concerns whether a factual finding would be made if it were false, and safety concerns how easily a factual finding could be false. The article critiques recent claims about the importance of sensitivity for the law of evidence. In particular, this critique argues that sensitivity does (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  27.  51
    The Destruction of the World Trade Center and the Law on Event-Identity: Michael S. Moore.Michael S. Moore - 2004 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 55:259-342.
    September 11, 2001 brought to legal awareness an issue that has long puzzled metaphysicians. The general issue is that of event-identity, drawing the boundaries of events so that we can tell when there is one event and when there are two. The September 11th version of that issue is: how many occurrences of insured events were there on September 11, 2001 in New York? Was the collapse of the two World Trade Center Towers one event, despite the two separate airliners (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28.  10
    Greater Advaita Vedānta: The Case of Niścaldās.Michael S. Allen - 2017 - International Journal of Hindu Studies 21 (3):275-297.
    To understand the history of Advaita Vedānta and its rise to prominence, we need to devote more attention to what might be termed “Greater Advaita Vedānta,” or Advaita Vedānta as expressed outside the standard canon of Sanskrit philosophical works. Elsewhere I have examined the works of Niścaldās, whose Hindi-language Vicār-sāgar was once referred to by Swami Vivekananda as the most influential book of its day. In this paper, I look back to one of Niścaldās’s major influences: Sundardās, a well-known Hindi (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  29. Causation and Responsibility.Michael S. Moore - 2008 - Oxford University Press UK.
    The concept of causation is fundamental to ascribing moral and legal responsibility for events. Yet the precise relationship between causation and responsibility remains unclear. This book clarifies that relationship through an analysis of the best accounts of causation in metaphysics, and a critique of the confusion in legal doctrine. The result is a powerful argument in favour of reforming the moral and legal understanding of how and why we attribute responsibility to agents.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   30 citations  
  30. Virtue, Emotion, and Attention.Michael S. Brady - 2010 - Metaphilosophy 41 (1-2):115-131.
    The perceptual model of emotions maintains that emotions involve, or are at least analogous to, perceptions of value. On this account, emotions purport to tell us about the evaluative realm, in much the same way that sensory perceptions inform us about the sensible world. An important development of this position, prominent in recent work by Peter Goldie amongst others, concerns the essential role that virtuous habits of attention play in enabling us to gain perceptual and evaluative knowledge. I think that (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   20 citations  
  31.  66
    The Cognitive Neurosciences III.Michael S. Gazzaniga (ed.) - 2004 - MIT Press.
    "The Cognitive Neurosciences III is a magnificent accomplishment. It covers topics trom ions to consciousness, from reflexes to social psychology. ...
    Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  32.  27
    On Hart's Category Mistake.Michael S. Green - 2013 - Legal Theory 19 (4):347-369.
    This essay concerns Scott Shapiro's criticism that H.L.A. Hart's theory of law suffers from a Although other philosophers of law have summarily dismissed Shapiro's criticism, I argue that it identifies an important requirement for an adequate theory of law. Such a theory must explain why legal officials justify their actions by reference to abstract propositional entities, instead of pointing to the existence of social practices. A virtue of Shapiro's planning theory of law is that it can explain this phenomenon. Despite (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  33. Act and Crime: The Philosophy of Action and its Implications for Criminal Law.Michael S. Moore - 1993 - Oxford University Press.
    This work provides, for the first time, a unified account of the theory of action presupposed by both British and American criminal law and its underlying morality. It defends the view that human actions are volitionally caused body movements. This theory illuminates three major problems in drafting and implementing criminal law--what the voluntary act requirement does and should require, what complex descriptions of actions prohibited by criminal codes both do and should require, and when the two actions are the "same" (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   19 citations  
  34. Placing Blame a General Theory of the Criminal Law.Michael S. Moore - 1997
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   39 citations  
  35. Consciousness and the Cerebral Hemispheres.Michael S. Gazzaniga - 1995 - In The Cognitive Neurosciences. MIT Press.
  36. Law as a Functional Kind.Michael S. Moore - 1992 - In Robert P. George (ed.), Natural Law Theory: Contemporary Essays. Oxford University Press.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  37. Emotions, Perceptions, and Reasons.Michael S. Brady - 2011 - In Carla Bagnoli (ed.), Morality and the Emotions. Oxford University Press.
  38.  30
    The Attention Schema Theory: A Mechanistic Account of Subjective Awareness.Michael S. A. Graziano & Taylor W. Webb - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  39.  16
    Libet's Challenge (s) to Responsible Agency.Michael S. Moore - 2010 - In Walter Sinnott-Armstrong & Lynn Nadel (eds.), Conscious Will and Responsibility: A Tribute to Benjamin Libet. Oup Usa. pp. 207.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  40.  6
    Going From Task Descriptions to Memory Structures.Michael S. Humphreys & Simon Dennis - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (3):483-483.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   48 citations  
  41.  11
    Personality, Motivation, and Performance: A Theory of the Relationship Between Individual Differences and Information Processing.Michael S. Humphreys & William Revelle - 1984 - Psychological Review 91 (2):153-184.
  42.  38
    The Roles of Cortical Oscillations in Sustained Attention.Michael S. Clayton, Nick Yeung & Roi Cohen Kadosh - 2015 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 19 (4):188-195.
  43.  72
    Juridical Proof and the Best Explanation.Michael S. Pardo & Ronald J. Allen - 2008 - Law and Philosophy 27 (3):223 - 268.
  44.  95
    Recalcitrant Emotions and Visual Illusions.Michael S. Brady - 2007 - American Philosophical Quarterly 44 (3):273 - 284.
  45.  15
    Organizational Ethics Research: A Systematic Review of Methods and Analytical Techniques.Michael S. McLeod, G. Tyge Payne & Robert E. Evert - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 134 (3):429-443.
    Ethics are of interest to business scholars because they influence decisions, behaviors, and outcomes. While scholars have increasingly shown interest in business ethics as a research topic, there are a mounting number of studies that examine ethical issues at the organizational level of analysis. This manuscript reports the results of a systematic review of empirical research on organizational ethics published in a broad sample of business journals over a 33-year period. A total of 184 articles are analyzed to reveal gaps (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  46.  78
    Source Incompatibilism, Ultimacy, and the Transfer of Non-Responsibility.Michael S. McKenna - 2001 - American Philosophical Quarterly 38 (1):37-51.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   39 citations  
  47.  11
    Episodically Unique and Generalized Memories: Applications to Human and Animal Amnesics.Michael S. Humphreys, John D. Bain & J. S. Burt - 1989 - In S. Lewandowsky, J. M. Dunn & K. Kirsner (eds.), Implicit Memory: Theoretical Issues. Lawrence Erlbaum. pp. 139--156.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   47 citations  
  48.  51
    A Bird's Eye View: Biological Categorization and Reasoning Within and Across Cultures.Jeremy N. Bailenson, Michael S. Shum, Scott Atran, Douglas L. Medin & John D. Coley - 2002 - Cognition 84 (1):1-53.
    Many psychological studies of categorization and reasoning use undergraduates to make claims about human conceptualization. Generalizability of findings to other populations is often assumed but rarely tested. Even when comparative studies are conducted, it may be challenging to interpret differences. As a partial remedy, in the present studies we adopt a 'triangulation strategy' to evaluate the ways expertise and culturally different belief systems can lead to different ways of conceptualizing the biological world. We use three groups (US bird experts, US (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   25 citations  
  49. The Limits of Evil and the Role of Moral Address: A Defense of Strawsonian Compatibilism. [REVIEW]Michael S. McKenna - 1998 - The Journal of Ethics 2 (2):123-142.
    P.F. Strawson defends compatibilism by appeal to our natural commitment to the interpersonal community and the reactive attitudes. While Strawson''s compatibilist project has much to recommend it, his account of moral agency appears incomplete. Gary Watson has attempted to fortify Strawson''s theory by appeal to the notion of moral address. Watson then proceeds to argue, however, that Strawson''s theory of moral responsibility (so fortified) would commit Strawson to treating extreme evil as its own excuse. Watson also argues that the reactive (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   25 citations  
  50.  8
    Culture, Identity and Islamic Schooling: A Philosophical Approach.Michael S. Merry - 2007 - New York: Palgrave Macmillan.
    In this book I offer a critical, comparative and empirically-informed defense of Islamic schools in the West. To do so I elaborate an idealized philosophy of Islamic education, against which I evaluate the situation in three different Western countries. I examine in details notions of cultural coherence, the scope of parental authority v. a child's interests, as well as the state's role in regulating religious schools. Further, using Catholic schools as an analogous case, I speculate on the likely future of (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
1 — 50 / 1000