Results for 'Carrie Packwood Freeman'

(not author) ( search as author name )
999 found
Order:
  1.  16
    A Greater Means to the Greater Good: Ethical Guidelines to Meet Social Movement Organization Advocacy Challenges.Carrie Packwood Freeman - 2009 - Journal of Mass Media Ethics 24 (4):269-288.
    Existing public relations ethics literature often proves inadequate when applied to social movement campaigns, considering the special communication challenges activists face as marginalized moral visionaries in a commercial public sphere. The communications of counter-hegemonic movements is distinct enough from corporate, nonprofit, and governmental organizations to warrant its own ethical guidelines. The unique communication guidelines most relevant to social movement organizations include promoting asymmetrical advocacy to a greater extent than is required for more powerful organizations and building flexibility into the TARES (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  2.  38
    Framing Animal Rights in the “Go Veg” Campaigns of U.S. Animal Rights Organizations.Carrie Packwood Freeman - 2010 - Society and Animals 18 (2):163-182.
    How much do animal rights activists talk about animal rights when they attempt to persuade America’s meat-lovers to stop eating nonhuman animals? This study serves as the basis for a unique evaluation and categorization of problems and solutions as framed by five major U.S. animal rights organizations in their vegan/food campaigns. The findings reveal that the organizations framed the problems as: cruelty and suffering; commodification; harm to humans and the environment; and needless killing. To solve problems largely blamed on factory (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  3. Embracing Humanimality : Deconstructing the Human/Animal Dichotomy.Carrie Packwood Freeman - 2010 - In Greg Goodale & Jason Edward Black (eds.), Arguments About Animal Ethics. Lexington Books.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  4. Arguments About Animal Ethics.Wendy Atkins-Sayre, Renee S. Besel, Richard D. Besel, Carrie Packwood Freeman, Laura K. Hahn, Brett Lunceford, Patricia Malesh, Sabrina Marsh, Jane Bloodworth Rowe & Mary Trachsel - 2014 - Lexington Books.
    Bringing together the expertise of rhetoricians in English and communication as well as media studies scholars, Arguments about Animal Ethics delves into the rhetorical and discursive practices of participants in controversies over the use of nonhuman animals for meat, entertainment, fur, and vivisection. Both sides of the debate are carefully analyzed, as the contributors examine how stakeholders persuade or fail to persuade audiences about the ethics of animal rights or the value of using animals.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5.  14
    Unnamed Sources: A Utilitarian Exploration of Their Justification and Guidelines for Limited Use.Matt J. Duffy & Carrie P. Freeman - 2011 - Journal of Mass Media Ethics 26 (4):297-315.
    This article critically examines the practice of unnamed sourcing in journalism. A literature review highlights arguments in favor of and against their use. The authors examine some common examples of anonymous sourcing using the lens of utilitarianism, the ethical model commonly used to justify the practice. We find that few uses of unnamed sourcing can be justified when weighed against diminished credibility and threats to fair, transparent reporting. The authors suggest specific guidelines for journalists that, if followed, would curb many (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  6. The Construction of Social Reality. Anthony Freeman in Conversation with John Searle.J. Searle & A. Freeman - 1995 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 2 (2):180-189.
    John Searle began to discuss his recently published book `The Construction of Social Reality' with Anthony Freeman, and they ended up talking about God. The book itself and part of their conversation are introduced and briefly reflected upon by Anthony Freeman. Many familiar social facts -- like money and marriage and monarchy -- are only facts by human agreement. They exist only because we believe them to exist. That is the thesis, at once startling yet obvious, that philosopher (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   544 citations  
  7. Ending the so-Called 'Friedman-Freeman'Debate.R. Edward Freeman - 2008 - Business Ethics Quarterly 18 (2):153-190.
  8.  21
    Pieces of Mind: The Proper Domain of Psychological Predicates.Carrie Figdor - 2018 - Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.
    Carrie Figdor presents a critical assessment of how psychological terms are used to describe the non-human biological world. She argues against the anthropocentric attitude which takes human cognition as the standard against which non-human capacities are measured, and offers an alternative basis for naturalistic explanation of the mind.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  9. Is Metaphysical Dependence Irreflexive?Carrie Jenkins - 2011 - The Monist 94 (2):267-276.
    The article explores the irreflexivity of metaphysical dependence in the physical structure of reality. It stresses that the word dependence denotes quasi-ireflexivity which affects the metaphysical relations of a physical structure. It focuses on the view that irreflexivity assumption has been made without discussion of the dependence relations on the structure of reality.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   135 citations  
  10. Neuroscience and the Multiple Realization of Cognitive Functions.Carrie Figdor - 2010 - Philosophy of Science 77 (3):419-456.
    Many empirically minded philosophers have used neuroscientific data to argue against the multiple realization of cognitive functions in existing biological organisms. I argue that neuroscientists themselves have proposed a biologically based concept of multiple realization as an alternative to interpreting empirical findings in terms of one‐to‐one structure‐function mappings. I introduce this concept and its associated research framework and also how some of the main neuroscience‐based arguments against multiple realization go wrong. *Received October 2009; revised December 2009. †To contact the author, (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   19 citations  
  11. Rawls.Samuel Freeman - 2007 - Routledge.
    In this superb introduction, Samuel Freeman introduces and assesses the main topics of Rawls' philosophy. Starting with a brief biography and charting the influences on Rawls' early thinking, he goes on to discuss the heart of Rawls's philosophy: his principles of justice and their practical application to society. Subsequent chapters discuss Rawls's theories of liberty, political and economic justice, democratic institutions, goodness as rationality, moral psychology, political liberalism, and international justice and a concluding chapter considers Rawls' legacy. Clearly setting (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   102 citations  
  12.  2
    Interview: Norma Guillard Limonta with Carrie Hamilton, Havana, April 2013.Carrie Hamilton - 2014 - Feminist Review 106 (1):104-121.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13. Jung's Wandering Archetype: Race and Religion in Analytical Psychology.Carrie B. Dohe - 2016 - Routledge.
    Is the Germanic god Wotan really an archaic archetype of the Spirit? Was the Third Reich at first a collective individuation process? After Friedrich Nietzsche heralded the "death of God," might the divine have been reborn as a collective form of self-redemption on German soil and in the Germanic soul? In _Jung’s Wandering Archetype_ Carrie Dohe presents a study of Jung’s writings on Germanic psychology from 1912 onwards, exploring the links between his views on religion and race and providing (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  14. The Psychological Speciesism of Humanism.Carrie Figdor - 2020 - Philosophical Studies (n.a.):1-25.
    Humanists argue for assigning the highest moral status to all humans over any non-humans directly or indirectly on the basis of uniquely superior human cognitive abilities. They may also claim that humanism is the strongest position from which to combat racism, sexism, and other forms of within-species discrimination. I argue that changing conceptual foundations in comparative research and discoveries of advanced cognition in many non-human species reveal humanism’s psychological speciesism and its similarity with common justifications of within-species discrimination.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  15. Relationship Between Cognition and Moral Status Needs Overhaul.Carrie Figdor - 2020 - Animal Sentience 29 (3):1-2.
    I commend Mikhalevich & Powell for extending the discussion of cognition and its relation to moral status with their well researched and argued target article on invertebrate cognition. I have two small criticisms: that the scala naturae still retains its appeal to some in biology as well as psychology, and that drawing the line at invertebrates requires a bit more defense given the larger comparative cognitive-scientific context.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  16.  20
    Ancilla to the Pre–Socratic Philosophers: A Complete Translation of the Fragments in Diels, Fragmente der Vorsokratiker. By K. Freeman. Pp. X + 162. Oxford: Blackwell, 1948. 8s. 6d. [REVIEW]J. S. Morrison & K. Freeman - 1949 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 69 (22):92-92.
  17.  71
    Societies of Brains: Walter Freeman in Conversation with Jean Burns.Walter J. Freeman & J. Burns - 1996 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 3 (2):172-180.
    [opening paragraph]: Walter Freeman discusses with Jean Burns some of the issues relating to consciousness in his recent book. Burns: To understand consciousness we need know its relationship to the brain, and to do that we need to know how the brain processes information. A lot of people think of brain processing in terms of individual neurons, and you're saying that brain processing should be understood in terms of dynamical states of populations?
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18. Justice and the Social Contract: Essays on Rawisian Political Philosophy.Samuel Freeman - 2006 - Oxford University Press USA.
    Samuel Freeman was a student of the influential philosopher John Rawls, he has edited numerous books dedicated to Rawls' work and is arguably Rawls' foremost interpreter. This volume collects new and previously published articles by Freeman on Rawls. Among other things, Freeman places Rawls within historical context in the social contract tradition, and thoughtfully addresses criticisms of this position. Not only is Freeman a leading authority on Rawls, but he is an excellent thinker in his own (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   51 citations  
  19. Assessing Freeman’s Stakeholder Theory.James A. Stieb - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 87 (3):401 - 414.
    At least since the publication of the monumental Strategic Management: A Stakeholder Approach (1984), the “stakeholder theory” originated by R. E. Freeman has engrossed much of the business ethics literature. Subsequently, some advocates have moved a bit too quickly and without proper definition or argument. They have exceeded Freeman’s intentions which are more libertarian and free-market than is often thought. This essay focuses on the versions of stakeholder theory directly authored or coauthored by Freeman in an effort (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  20. Intrinsically/Extrinsically.Carrie Figdor - 2008 - Journal of Philosophy 105 (11):691-718.
    I separate two intrinsic/extrinsic distinctions that are often conflated: one between properties (the intrinsic/extrinsic, or I/E, distinction) and one between the ways in which properties are had by individuals (the intrinsically/extrinsically, or I-ly/E-ly, distinction). I propose an analysis of the I-ly/E-ly distinction and its relation to the I/E distinction that explains, inter alia, the puzzle of cross-classification: how it can be, for example, that the property of being square can be classified as an intrinsic property and yet individuals can be (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  21. On the Proper Domain of Psychological Predicates.Carrie Figdor - 2017 - Synthese 194 (11):4289-4310.
    One question of the bounds of cognition is that of which things have it. A scientifically relevant debate on this question must explain the persistent and selective use of psychological predicates to report findings throughout biology: for example, that neurons prefer, fruit flies and plants decide, and bacteria communicate linguistically. This paper argues that these claims should enjoy default literal interpretation. An epistemic consequence is that these findings can contribute directly to understanding the nature of psychological capacities.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  22. What’s the Use of an Intrinsic Property?Carrie Figdor - 2014 - In Robert M. Francescotti (ed.), Companion to Intrinsic Properties. De Gruyter. pp. 139-156.
    Work on the intrinsic/extrinsic distinction is often motivated by its use in other areas, such as intrinsic value, real vs. Cambridge change, supervenience and other topics. With the exception of Figdor 2008, philosophers have sought to articulate a global distinction -- a distinction between kinds of properties, rather than ways in which individuals have properties. I argue that global I/E distinctions are unable to do the work that allegedly motivates them, focusing on the case of intrinsic value.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  23.  50
    Systematicity and Arbitrariness in Novel Communication Systems.Carrie Ann Theisen, Jon Oberlander & Simon Kirby - 2010 - Interaction Studies 11 (1):14-32.
  24.  17
    The Sophists. By M. Untersteiner. Translated From the Italian by K. Freeman. Pp. Xvi + 368. Oxford: Blackwell, 1954. 31s. 6d. [REVIEW]G. B. Kerferd, M. Untersteiner & K. Freeman - 1955 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 75:166-167.
  25. Trust Me: News, Credibility Deficits, and Balance.Carrie Figdor - 2018 - In Joe Saunders & Carl Fox (eds.), Media Ethics, Free Speech, and the Requirements of Democracy. New York, USA and Abingdon, UK: Routledge. pp. 69-86.
    When a society is characterized by a climate of distrust, how does this impact the professional practices of news journalism? I focus on the practice of balance, or fair presentation of both sides in a story. I articulate a two-step model of how trust modulates the acceptance of tes-timony and draw out its implications for justifying the practice of balance.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  26. R. Edward Freeman.October Freeman - 1994 - The Politics of Stakeholder Theory: Some Future Direction, Business Ethics Quarterly 4:409-421.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27.  14
    Reply to My Commentator - Freeman.James B. Freeman - unknown
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28. The Politics of Stakeholder Theory: Some Future Directions.R. Edward Freeman - 1994 - Business Ethics Quarterly 4 (4):409-421.
    The purpose of this paper is to enter the conversation about stakeholder theory with the goal of clarifying certain foundational issues. I want to show, along with Boatright, that there is no stakeholder paradox, and that the principle on which such a paradox is built, the Separation Thesis, is nicely self-serving to business and ethics academics. If we give up such a thesis we find there is no stakeholder theory but that stakeholder theory becomes a genre that is quite rich. (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   296 citations  
  29. What Love Is And What It Could Be.Carrie Jenkins - forthcoming - Basic Books.
    This book unpicks the conceptual, ideological, and metaphysical tangles that get in the way of understanding romantic love. -/- Written for a general audience, What Love Is And What It Could Be explores different disciplinary perspectives on love, in search of the bigger picture. It presents a "dual-nature" theory: romantic love is simultaneously both a biological phenomenon and a social construct. The key philosophical insight comes in explaining why this a coherent—and indeed a necessary—position to take. -/- The deep motivation (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  30. The Rise of Cognitive Science in the 20th Century.Carrie Figdor - 2018 - In Amy Kind (ed.), Philosophy of Mind in the Twentieth and Twenty-First Centuries: The History of the Philosophy of Mind, Volume 6. Abingdon, UK and New York: Routledge. pp. 280-302.
    This chapter describes the conceptual foundations of cognitive science during its establishment as a science in the 20th century. It is organized around the core ideas of individual agency as its basic explanans and information-processing as its basic explanandum. The latter consists of a package of ideas that provide a mathematico-engineering framework for the philosophical theory of materialism.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  31. Is Free Will Necessary for Moral Responsibility?: A Case for Rethinking Their Relationship and the Design of Experimental Studies in Moral Psychology.Carrie Figdor & Mark Phelan - 2015 - Mind and Language 30 (5):603-627.
    Philosophical tradition has long held that free will is necessary for moral responsibility. We report experimental results that show that the folk do not think free will is necessary for moral responsibility. Our results also suggest that experimental investigation of the relationship is ill served by a focus on incompatibilism versus compatibilism. We propose an alternative framework for empirical moral psychology in which judgments of free will and moral responsibility can vary independently in response to many factors. We also suggest (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  32. Semantic Externalism and the Mechanics of Thought.Carrie Figdor - 2009 - Minds and Machines 19 (1):1-24.
    I review a widely accepted argument to the conclusion that the contents of our beliefs, desires and other mental states cannot be causally efficacious in a classical computational model of the mind. I reply that this argument rests essentially on an assumption about the nature of neural structure that we have no good scientific reason to accept. I conclude that computationalism is compatible with wide semantic causal efficacy, and suggest how the computational model might be modified to accommodate this possibility.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  33. Quantifying the Gender Gap: An Empirical Study of the Underrepresentation of Women in Philosophy.Molly Paxton, Carrie Figdor & Valerie Tiberius - 2012 - Hypatia 27 (4):949-957.
    The lack of gender parity in philosophy has garnered serious attention recently. Previous empirical work that aims to quantify what has come to be called “the gender gap” in philosophy focuses mainly on the absence of women in philosophy faculty and graduate programs. Our study looks at gender representation in philosophy among undergraduate students, undergraduate majors, graduate students, and faculty. Our findings are consistent with what other studies have found about women faculty in philosophy, but we were able to add (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   44 citations  
  34. What is the “Cognitive” in Cognitive Neuroscience?Carrie Figdor - 2013 - Neuroethics 6 (1):105-114.
    This paper argues that the cognitive neuroscientific use of ordinary mental terms to report research results and draw implications can contribute to public confusion and misunderstanding regarding neuroscience results. This concern is raised at a time when cognitive neuroscientists are increasingly required by funding agencies to link their research to specific results of public benefit, and when neuroethicists have called for greater attention to public communication of neuroscience. The paper identifies an ethical dimension to the problem and presses for greater (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  35.  27
    An Introduction to Philosophy of Education.Carrie Winstanley - 2007 - British Journal of Educational Studies 55 (1):108-110.
  36. Stakeholder Theory: A Libertarian Defense.R. Edward Freeman & Robert A. Phillips - 2002 - Business Ethics Quarterly 12 (3):331-350.
    Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to suggest that at least one strain of what has come to be called “stakeholder theory” has roots that are deeply libertarian. We begin by explicating both “stakeholder theory” and “libertarian arguments.” We show how there are libertarian arguments for both instrumental and normative stakeholder theory, and we construct a version of capitalism, called “stakeholder capitalism,” that builds on these libertarian ideas. We argue throughout that strong notions of “freedom” and “voluntary action” are (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   58 citations  
  37.  18
    Alluring Ideas: Cherry Picking Policy From Around the World.Carrie Winstanley - 2012 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 46 (4):516-531.
    A common feature of contemporary policymaking is the sharing and adaptation of policies from other countries. As neo-liberal globalisation continues to impact on the development of policy, such practices are increasingly commonplace. This article considers the current phenomenon of ‘policy borrowing’ with reference to the use of data from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the 2010 Schools White Paper The Importance of Teaching. The article also traces the origins of policy borrowing and shows what philosophy of education (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  38. Changing School Subjects: Power, Gender and Curriculum.Carrie Paechter - 2002 - British Journal of Educational Studies 50 (3):392-393.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  39.  30
    The Ethical Primate. Anthony Freeman in Discussion with Mary Midgley.M. Midgley & A. Freeman - 1995 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 2 (1):67-75.
    [opening paragraph}: The latest book by moral philosopher Mary Midgley prompted Anthony Freeman to consider some of the cultural and ethical aspects of consciousness and to discuss them with the author. What have ethics to do with consciousness? First, it is consciousness that makes morality possible. Second, neither subject fits comfortably into currently popular reductive schemes. As a consequence both have tended to be isolated in a ghetto, shut off from the rest of the intellectual scene. So believes Mary (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  40. Experimental Philosophy and the Underrepresentation of Women.Carrie Figdor & Matt L. Drabek - 2016 - In W. Buckwalter & J. Sytsma (eds.), A Companion to Experimental Philosophy. Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 590-602.
    This paper summarizes recent and ongoing experimental work regarding the reality, nature, effects, and causes of the underrepresentation of women in academic philosophy. We first present empirical data on several aspects of underrepresentation, and then consider various reasons why this gender imbalance is problematic. We then turn to the published and preliminary results of empirical work aimed at identifying factors that might explain it.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  41.  49
    The Effects of Performance Rating, Leader–Member Exchange, Perceived Utility, and Organizational Justice on Performance Appraisal Satisfaction: Applying a Moral Judgment Perspective.Carrie Dusterhoff, J. Barton Cunningham & James N. MacGregor - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 119 (2):1-9.
    The performance appraisal process is increasingly seen as a key link between employee behaviour and an organization’s strategic objectives. Unfortunately, performance reviews often fail to change how people work, and dissatisfaction with the appraisal process has been associated with general job dissatisfaction, lower organizational commitment, and increased intentions to quit. Recent research has identified a number of factors related to reactions to performance appraisals in general and appraisal satisfaction in particular. Beyond the appraisal outcome itself, researchers have found that appraisal (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  42.  60
    Dialectics and the Macrostructure of Arguments: A Theory of Argument Structure.James B. Freeman - 1991 - Foris Publications.
    Chapter The Need for a Theory of Argument Structure. THE STANDARD APPROACH The approach to argument diagramming which we call standard was originated, ...
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   75 citations  
  43.  2
    Sex, Work, Meat: The Feminist Politics of Veganism.Carrie Hamilton - 2016 - Feminist Review 114 (1):112-129.
    Since the publication of The Sexual Politics of Meat in 1990, activist and writer Carol J. Adams has put forth a feminist defence of veganism based on the argument that meat consumption and violence against animals are structurally related to violence against women, and especially to pornography and prostitution. Adams’ work has been influential in the growing fields of animal studies and posthumanism, where her research is frequently cited as the prime example of vegan feminism. However, her particular radical feminist (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  44.  97
    Deliberative Democracy: A Sympathetic Comment.Samuel Freeman - 2000 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 29 (4):371-418.
  45. Semantics and Metaphysics in Informatics: Toward an Ontology of Tasks (a Reply to Lenartowicz Et Al. 2010, Towards an Ontology of Cognitive Control).Carrie Figdor - 2011 - Topics in Cognitive Science 3 (2):222-226.
    This article clarifies three principles that should guide the development of any cognitive ontology. First, that an adequate cognitive ontology depends essentially on an adequate task ontology; second, that the goal of developing a cognitive ontology is independent of the goal of finding neural implementations of the processes referred to in the ontology; and third, that cognitive ontologies are neutral regarding the metaphysical relationship between cognitive and neural processes.
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  46. Objectivity in the News: Finding a Way Forward.Carrie Figdor - 2010 - Journal of Mass Media Ethics 25 (1):19 – 33.
    Many media critics believe news reports are inevitably biased and have urged journalists to abandon the objectivity norm. I show that the main arguments for inevitable bias fail but identify factors that make producing objective news difficult. I indicate what the next steps should be to understand bias in the news and to combat it.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  47.  16
    History as Form: Architecture and Liberal Anglican Thought in the Writings of Ea Freeman.Edward A. Freeman - 2011 - Modern Intellectual History 8 (2):299-326.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  48. Law and Bioethics / Edited by Michael Freeman.Michael D. A. Freeman (ed.) - 2008 - Oxford University Press.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49. Verbs and Minds.Carrie Figdor - 2014 - In Mark Sprevak Jesper Kallestrup (ed.), New Waves in Philosophy of Mind.
    I introduce and defend verbialism, a metaphysical framework appropriate for accommodating the mind within the natural sciences and the mechanistic model of explanation that ties the natural sciences together. Verbialism is the view that mental phenomena belong in the basic ontological category of activities. If mind is what brain does, then explaining the mind is explaining how it occurs, and the ontology of mind is verbialist -- at least, it ought to be. I motivate verbialism by revealing a kind of (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  50.  7
    Assessing Freeman’s Stakeholder Theory.James A. Stieb - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 87 (3):401-414.
    At least since the publication of the monumental Strategic Management: A Stakeholder Approach, the "stakeholder theory" originated by R. E. Freeman has engrossed much of the business ethics literature. Subsequently, some advocates have moved a bit too quickly and without proper definition or argument. They have exceeded Freeman's intentions which are more libertarian and free-market than is often thought. This essay focuses on the versions of stakeholder theory directly authored or coauthored by Freeman in an effort to (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
1 — 50 / 999