Results for 'Lord Kames'

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  1.  82
    Hard Theological Determinism and the Illusion of Free Will: Sri Ramakrishna Meets Lord Kames, Saul Smilansky, and Derk Pereboom.Ayon Maharaj - 2018 - Journal of World Philosophies 3 (2):24-48.
    This essay reconstructs the sophisticated views on free will and determinism of the nineteenth-century Hindu mystic Sri Ramakrishna and brings them into dialogue with the views of three western philosophers—namely, the Scottish Enlightenment philosopher Lord Kames and the contemporary analytic philosophers Saul Smilansky and Derk Pereboom. Sri Ramakrishna affirms hard theological determinism, the incompatibilist view that God determines everything we do and think. At the same time, however, he claims that God, in His infinite wisdom, has endowed ordinary (...)
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  2.  5
    A History of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens 1882–1942. By L. E. Lord. Pp. Xiv + 417; Pl. 44 + 2 Plans. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press for American School of Classical Studies, 1947. $5. [REVIEW]J. M. Cook & L. E. Lord - 1949 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 69:99-99.
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  3.  25
    Arthur E. McGuiness, "Henry Home, Lord Kames"; and William C. Lehman, "Henry Home, Lord Kames and the Scottish Enlightenment". [REVIEW]David Fate Norton - 1973 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 11 (4):547.
  4.  10
    Andreas Rahmatian, Ed., Lord Kames: Selected Writings. [REVIEW]Rachel Zuckert - 2018 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 16 (2):200-204.
  5.  19
    Ian Simpson Ross, "Lord Kames and the Scotland of His Day". [REVIEW]Roger L. Emerson - 1975 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 13 (1):111.
  6.  16
    Henry Home, Lord Kames, Principles of Equity, Edited and with an Introduction by Michael Lobban. Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2014. 603 Pp. $24 Hb. ISBN 9780865976153. [REVIEW]Colin Heydt - 2015 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 13 (2):175-178.
  7.  11
    Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries Henry Home, Lord Kames, and the Scottish Enlightenment. By William C. Lehmann. The Hague: Martinus Nijhoff, 1971. Pp. Xxvi + 358. 60.15 Guilders. Lord Kames and the Scotland of His Day. By Ian Simpson Ross. Oxford: Clarendon Press: Oxford University Press, 1972. Pp. Ix + 420. £6. [REVIEW]J. B. Morrell - 1973 - British Journal for the History of Science 6 (3):326-327.
  8.  9
    James Burnett, Lord MonboddoE. L. CloydHenry Home, Lord Kames, and the Scottish Enlightenment: A Study in National Character and in the History of IdeasWilliam C. Lehmann. [REVIEW] Stocking - 1974 - Isis 65 (3):416-418.
  9.  6
    David Hume and Lord Kames on Personal Identity.Albert Tsugawa - 1961 - Journal of the History of Ideas 22 (3):398.
  10.  7
    1694-1746 Francis Hutcheson 1696-1782 Henry Home, Raised to the Bench as Lord Kames 1752 1698-1746 Colin Maclaurin 1698-1748 George Turnbull 1704 Isaac Newton's Opticks. [REVIEW]Thomas Reid - 2004 - In Terence Cuneo Rene van Woudenberg (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Thomas Reid. Cambridge University Press.
  11.  3
    Andreas Rahmatian, Lord Kames: Legal and Social Theorist. [REVIEW]Christopher A. Shrock - 2017 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 15 (2):233-235.
  12.  5
    James Burnett, Lord Monboddo by E. L. Cloyd; Henry Home, Lord Kames, and the Scottish Enlightenment: A Study in National Character and in the History of Ideas by William C. Lehmann. [REVIEW]George Stocking Jr - 1974 - Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 65:416-418.
  13.  5
    The Historicity of Morality: Necessity and Necessary Agents in the Ethics of Lord Kames.Ari Helo - 2001 - History of European Ideas 27 (3):239-255.
  14. Henry Home, Lord Kames.Arthur E. McGuinness - 1970 - New York: Twayne Publishers.
  15. Butler's Stone.John J. Tilley - 2018 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 99 (4): 891–909.
    Early in the eleventh of his Fifteen Sermons, Joseph Butler advances his best-known argument against psychological hedonism. Elliott Sober calls that argument Butler’s stone, and famously objects to it. I consider whether Butler’s stone has philosophical value. In doing so I examine, and reject, two possible ways of overcoming Sober’s objection, each of which has proponents. In examining the first way I discuss Lord Kames’s version of the stone argument, which has hitherto escaped scholarly attention. Finally, I show (...)
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  16. The Importance of Being Rational.Errol Lord - 2018 - Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.
    Errol Lord offers a new account of the nature of rationality: what it is for one to be rational is to correctly respond to the normative reasons one possesses. Lord defends novel views about what it is to possess reasons and what it is to correctly respond to reasons, and dispels doubts about whether we ought to be rational.
     
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  17.  8
    Unsocial Sociability in the Scottish Enlightenment: Ferguson and Kames on War, Sociability and the Foundations of Patriotism.Iain McDaniel - 2015 - History of European Ideas 41 (5):662-682.
    SummaryThis article reconstructs a significant historical alternative to the theories of ‘cosmopolitan’ or ‘liberal’ patriotism often associated with the Scottish Enlightenment. Instead of focusing on the work of Andrew Fletcher, Francis Hutcheson, David Hume or Adam Smith, this study concentrates on the theories of sociability, patriotism and international rivalry elaborated by Adam Ferguson and Henry Home, Lord Kames. Centrally, the article reconstructs both thinkers' shared perspective on what I have called ‘unsociable’ or ‘agonistic’ patriotism, an eighteenth-century idiom which (...)
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  18. Ideal Presence: How Kames Solved the Problem of Fiction and Emotion.Eva Dadlez - 2011 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 9 (1):115-133.
    The problem of fiction and emotion is the problem of how we can be moved by the contemplation of fictional events and the plight of fictional characters when we know that the former have not occurred and the latter do not exist. I will give a general sketch of the philosophical treatment of the issue in the present day, and then turn to the eighteenth century for a solution as effective as the best that are presently on offer. The solution (...)
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  19.  30
    Are We Morally Equal by Nature?Beth Lord - unknown
    Beth Lord explores Spinoza’s rejection of natural moral equality and its relevance for modern democracy.
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  20. The Politics.Carnes Lord (ed.) - 1985 - University of Chicago Press.
    This new translation of one of the fundamental texts of Western political thought combines strict fidelity to Aristotle's Greek with a contemporary English prose style. Lord's intention throughout is to retain Aristotle's distinctive style. The accompanying notes provide literary and historical references, call attention to textual problems, and supply other essential information and interpretation. A glossary supplies working definitions of key terms in Aristotle's philosophical-political vocabulary as well as a guide to linguistic relationships that are not always reflected in (...)
     
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  21.  22
    We Practice What You Preach.Rev Daniel A. Lord - 1928 - Modern Schoolman 4 (8):123-124.
    The December 1927 issue of the SCHOOLMAN contained Father Lord's forceful statements contending that philosophers could do nothing more conducive to their scholastic success than give forth again the philosophy they had assimilated by writing it out. The present vivid story is proof that Father Lord himself had "practiced what he preaches," for he wrote it during his own philosophate career. It is through the kind permission of the Editor of America, that this article appears in our magazine.
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  22.  25
    Kames on Ideal Presence.Eva Dadlez - 2010 - Southwest Philosophy Review 26 (1):17-25.
    The problem of fiction and emotion is the problem of how we can be moved by the contemplation of fi ctional events and the plight of fictional characters when we know that the former have not occurred and the latter do not exist. I will give a general sketch of the philosophical treatment of the issue in the present day, and then turn to the eighteenth century for a solution as effective as the best that are presently on offer. The (...)
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  23.  14
    Gerard, Kames, Alison, and Stewart.Rachel Zuckert - 2012 - In Timothy M. Costelloe (ed.), The Sublime: From Antiquity to the Present. Cambridge University Press. pp. 64.
    This essay concerns the theories of the sublime proposed by Alexander Gerard, Henry Home (Lord Kames), Archibald Alison, and Dugald Stewart. All four thinkers, I argue, aim to provide a philosophical account of the unity of the concept of the sublime, i.e., to respond to the question: what might all objects, art works, etc. that have been identified as sublime (or “grand”) in the philosophical, literary, art-theoretical, and rhetorical tradition have in common? Yet because they find the objects (...)
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  24.  7
    Kames on Ideal Presence: Revisiting the Problem of Fiction and Emotion.Eva Dadlez - 2010 - Southwest Philosophy Review 26 (1):17-25.
    The problem of fiction and emotion is the problem of how we can be moved by the contemplation of fi ctional events and the plight of fictional characters when we know that the former have not occurred and the latter do not exist. I will give a general sketch of the philosophical treatment of the issue in the present day, and then turn to the eighteenth century for a solution as effective as the best that are presently on offer. The (...)
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  25. Artists, Patrons, and the Public: Why Culture Changes.Barry Lord & Gail Dexter Lord - 2010 - Altamira Press.
    Barry Lord and Gail Dexter Lord focus their two lifetimes of international experience working in the cultural sector on the challenging questions of why and how culture changes. The answer is a dynamic and fascinating discourse that sets aesthetic culture in its material, physical, social, and political context, illuminating the primary role of the artist and the essential role of patronage in supporting the artist, from our ancient origins to the knowledge economy culture of today.
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  26. Aristotle's "Politics": Second Edition.Carnes Lord (ed.) - 2013 - University of Chicago Press.
    One of the fundamental works of Western political thought, Aristotle’s masterwork is the first systematic treatise on the science of politics. For almost three decades, Carnes Lord’s justly acclaimed translation has served as the standard English edition. Widely regarded as the most faithful to both the original Greek and Aristotle’s distinctive style, it is also written in clear, contemporary English. This new edition of the _Politics _retains and adds to Lord’s already extensive notes, clarifying the flow of Aristotle’s (...)
     
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  27. Acting for the Right Reasons, Abilities, and Obligation.Errol Lord - 2015 - In Russ Shafer-Landau (ed.), Oxford Studies in Metaethics, Volume 10. Oxford University Press.
    Objectivists about obligation hold that obligations are determined by all of the normatively relevant facts. Perspectivalists, on the other hand, hold that only facts within one's perspective can determine what we are obligated to do. In this paper I argue for a perspectivalist view. On my view, what you are obligated to do is determined by the normative reasons you possess. My argument for my view is anchored in the thought that our obligations have to be action-guiding in a certain (...)
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  28. The Coherent and the Rational.Errol Lord - 2014 - Analytic Philosophy 55 (2):151-175.
  29. Having Reasons and the Factoring Account.Errol Lord - 2010 - Philosophical Studies 149 (3):283 - 296.
    It’s natural to say that when it’s rational for me to φ, I have reasons to φ. That is, there are reasons for φ-ing, and moreover, I have some of them. Mark Schroeder calls this view The Factoring Account of the having reasons relation. He thinks The Factoring Account is false. In this paper, I defend The Factoring Account. Not only do I provide intuitive support for the view, but I also defend it against Schroeder’s criticisms. Moreover, I show that (...)
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  30. From Independence to Conciliationism: An Obituary.Errol Lord - 2013 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy (2):1-13.
    Australasian Journal of Philosophy, Volume 92, Issue 2, Page 365-377, June 2014.
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  31. The Importance of Being Rational.Errol Lord - 2013 - Dissertation, Princeton University
    My dissertation is a systematic defense of the claim that what it is to be rational is to correctly respond to the reasons you possess. The dissertation is split into two parts, each consisting of three chapters. In Part I--Coherence, Possession, and Correctly Responding--I argue that my view has important advantages over popular views in metaethics that tie rationality to coherence (ch. 2), defend a novel view of what it is to possess a reason (ch. 3), and defend a novel (...)
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  32. The Real Symmetry Problem(s) for Wide-Scope Accounts of Rationality.Errol Lord - 2013 - Philosophical Studies (3):1-22.
    You are irrational when you are akratic. On this point most agree. Despite this agreement, there is a tremendous amount of disagreement about what the correct explanation of this data is. Narrow-scopers think that the correct explanation is that you are violating a narrow-scope conditional requirement. You lack an intention to x that you are required to have given the fact that you believe you ought to x. Wide-scopers disagree. They think that a conditional you are required to make true (...)
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  33. Dancy on Acting for the Right Reason.Errol Lord - 2007 - Journal of Ethics and Social Philosophy (3):1-7.
    It is a truism that agents can do the right action for the right reason. To put the point in terms more familiar to ethicists, it is a truism that one’s motivating reason can be one’s normative reason. In this short note, I will argue that Jonathan Dancy’s preferred view about how this is possible faces a dilemma. Dancy has the choice between accounting for two plausible constraints while at the same time holding an outlandish philosophy of mind by his (...)
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  34. Violating Requirements, Exiting From Requirements, and the Scope of Rationality.Errol Lord - 2011 - Philosophical Quarterly 61 (243):392-399.
    It is generally agreed that many types of attitudinal incoherence are irrational, but there is controversy about why they are. Some think incoherence is irrational because it violates certain wide-scope conditional requirements, others (‘narrow-scopers’) that it violates narrow-scope conditional requirements. In his paper ‘The Scope of Rational Requirements’, John Brunero has offered a putative counter-example to narrow-scope views. But a narrow-scoper should reject a crucial assumption which Brunero makes, namely, the claim that we always violate conditional narrow-scope requirements when we (...)
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  35. Kant and Spinozism: Transcendental Idealism and Immanence From Jacobi to Deleuze.Beth Lord - 2011 - Palgrave-Macmillan.
  36. Epistemic Reasons, Evidence, and Defeaters.Errol Lord - forthcoming - In Daniel Star (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Reasons and Normativity. Oxford University Press.
    The post-Gettier literature contained many views that tried to solve the Gettier problem by appealing to the notion of defeat. Unfortunately, all of these views are false. The failure of these views greatly contributed to a general distrust of reasons in epistemology. However, reasons are making a comeback in epistemology, both in general and in the context of the Gettier problem. There are two main aims of this paper. First, I will argue against a natural defeat based resolution of the (...)
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  37. Wealth and Virtue the Shaping of Political Economy in the Scottish Enlightenment.Istvan Hont & Michael Ignatieff (eds.) - 1983 - Cambridge University Press.
    Wealth and Virtue reassesses the remarkable contribution of the Scottish Enlightenment to the formation of modern economics and to theories of capitalism. Its unique range indicates the scope of the Scottish intellectual achievement of the eighteenth century and explores the process by which the boundaries between economic thought, jurisprudence, moral philosophy and theoretical history came to be established. Dealing not only with major figures like Hume and Smith, there are also studies of lesser known thinkers like Andrew Fletcher, Gershom Carmichael, (...)
     
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  38.  91
    The Psychology Of Kant’s Aesthetics.Paul Guyer - 2008 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 39 (4):483-494.
    Contrary to both his own intentions and the views of both older and more recent commentators, I argue that Kant’s aesthetics remains within the confines of eighteenth-century aesthetics as a branch of empirical psychology, as it was then practiced. Kant established a plausible connection between aesthetic experience and judgment on the one hand and cognition in general on the other, through his explanatory concept of the free play of our cognitive powers. However, there is nothing distinctly ‘a priori’ or ‘transcendental’ (...)
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  39. Education and Culture in the Political Thought of Aristotle.Carnes Lord - 1982 - Cornell University Press.
  40.  50
    ‘Disempowered by Nature’: Spinoza on The Political Capabilities of Women.Beth Lord - 2011 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 19 (6):1085 - 1106.
    This paper examines Spinoza's remarks on women in the Political Treatise in the context of his views in the Ethics about human community and similitude. Although these remarks appear to exclude women from democratic participation on the basis of essential incapacities, I aim to show that Spinoza intended these remarks not as true statements, but as prompts for critical consideration of the place of women in the progressive democratic polity. In common with other scholars, I argue that women, in Spinoza's (...)
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  41. A Note on Ruth Lorand's ‘Free and Dependent Beauty: A Puzzling Issue’.Catherine Lord - 1991 - British Journal of Aesthetics 31 (2):167-168.
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  42.  46
    William Robertson and Scientific Theism.Joshua Ehrlich - 2013 - Modern Intellectual History 10 (3):519-542.
    Scholars have hitherto found little to no place for natural philosophy in the intellectual makeup of the Enlightened historian William Robertson, overlooking his significant contacts with that province and its central relevance to the controversy surrounding David Hume and Lord Kames in the 1750s. Here I reexamine Robertson's Situation of the World at the Time of Christ's Appearance (1755) in light of these contexts. I argue that his foundational sermon drew upon the scientific theism of such thinkers as (...)
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  43. Indexicality, Not Circularity: Dickie's New Definition of Art.Catherine Lord - 1987 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 45 (3):229-232.
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  44.  89
    Religion and the 'Sensitive Branch' of Human Nature.Benjamin D. Crowe - 2010 - Religious Studies 46 (2):251-263.
    While the theses that (1) human beings are primarily passional creatures and that (2) religion is fundamentally a product of our sensible nature are both closely linked to David Hume, Hume's contemporary Henry Home, Lord Kames (1696–1782), also defended them and explored their implications. Importantly, Kames does not draw the same sceptical conclusions as does Hume. Employing a sophisticated account of the rationality of what he calls the 'sensitive branch' of human nature, Kames argues that religion (...)
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  45.  8
    The Continuum Companion to Continental Philosophy.John Mullarkey & Beth Lord (eds.) - 2009 - Continuum.
    The Continuum Companion to Continental Philosophy offers the definitive guide to contemporary continental thought.
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  46.  38
    Lessons From the Experience of U.N. Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities: Addressing the Democratic Deficit in Global Health Governance.Janet E. Lord, David Suozzi & Allyn L. Taylor - 2010 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 38 (3):564-579.
    This article reviews the contributions of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities to the progressive development of both international human rights law and global health law and governance. It provides a summary of the global situation of persons with disabilities and outlines the progressive development of international disability standards, noting the salience of the shift from a medical model of disability to a rights-based social model reflected in the CRPD. Thereafter, the article considers the Convention's structure (...)
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  47. On Moral Sentiments: Contemporary Responses to Adam Smith.John Reeder (ed.) - 1997 - Thoemmes Press.
    This unique anthology brings together for the first time the reactions that greeted the publication of Adam Smith's major philosophical work, The Theory of Moral Sentiments (1759). Spanning over a hundred years of critical responses, the collection includes three different sections: the initial reply from Smith's friends David Hume, Edmund Burke and William Robertson the more considered opinions put forward by Smith's contemporaries, fellow Scots philosophers such as Lord Kames, Thomas Reid, Adam Ferguson or Dugald Stewart and, finally, (...)
     
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  48.  19
    The Scottish Enlightenment and the End of the Philosophical Society of Edinburgh.Roger L. Emerson - 1988 - British Journal for the History of Science 21 (1):33-66.
    The story of the end of the Philosophical Society of Edinburgh in 1783, is linked with that of the founding of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland and the Royal Society of Edinburgh , both of which were given Royal Charters sealed on 6 May 1783. It is a story which has been admirably told by Steven Shapin. He persuasively argued that the P.S.E. was a casualty of bitter quarrels rooted in local Edinburgh politics, in personal animosities and in disputes (...)
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  49.  47
    Scottish Philosophy in the 18th Century.Alexander Broadie - 2001 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Philosophy was at the core of the eighteenth century movement known as the Scottish Enlightenment. The movement included major figures, such as Francis Hutcheson, David Hume, Adam Smith, Thomas Reid and Adam Ferguson, and also many others who produced notable works, such as Gershom Carmichael, George Turnbull, George Campbell, James Beattie, Alexander Gerard, Henry Home (Lord Kames) and Dugald Stewart. I discuss some of the leading ideas of these thinkers, though paying less attention than I otherwise would to (...)
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  50.  5
    Religion and the ‘Sensitive Branch’ of Human Nature: BENJAMIN D. CROWE.Benjamin D. Crowe - 2010 - Religious Studies 46 (2):251-263.
    While the theses that human beings are primarily passional creatures and that religion is fundamentally a product of our sensible nature are both closely linked to David Hume, Hume's contemporary Henry Home, Lord Kames , also defended them and explored their implications. Importantly, Kames does not draw the same sceptical conclusions as does Hume. Employing a sophisticated account of the rationality of what he calls the ‘sensitive branch’ of human nature, Kames argues that religion plays a (...)
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