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  1. What Thomas More Learned About Utopia From Herodotus.Thornton Lockwood - 2021 - In Jan Opsomer & Pierre Destrée (eds.), Ancient Utopian Thought. Berlin, Germany: pp. 57-76.
    In Thomas More’s Utopia, the character of Raphael Hythloday bestows upon the islanders of Utopia a library of Greek authors that includes Herodotus (alongside more traditional political thinkers such as Plato, Aristotle, and Thucydides). Herodotus’ inclusion on the Utopian reading list invites the question of whether his Histories is in any sense a work in utopian political theory. Although Herodotus is sometimes excluded from the canon of the Histories of political thought because of his lack of interest in political constitutions, (...)
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  2. A Hot Mess: Girolamo Cardano, the Inquisition and the Soul.Jonathan Regier - forthcoming - Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science.
  3. Healing the Body Politic: The Political Thought of Christine de Pizan.Karen Green & Constant Mews (eds.) - 2005 - Turnhout: Brepols.
    The essays in this collection focus on Christine as a political writer and provide an important resource for those wishing to understand her political thought. They locate her political writing in the late medieval tradition, discussing her indebtedness to Aristotle, Aquinas and Augustine as well as her transformations of their thought. They also illuminate Christines political epistemology her understanding of political wisdom as a part of theology, the knowledge of God. New light is thrown on the circumstances which prompted Christine (...)
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  4. Commentary on Aristotle’s ‘Nicomachean Ethics’.Peter Martyr Vermigli - 2006 - Kirksville: Truman State University Press.
  5. On the Law of Nature: A Demonstrative Method.Niels Hemmingsen - 2018 - Grand Rapids: CLP Academic.
  6. Writing Faith and Telling Tales: Literature, Politics, and Religion in the Work of Thomas More.Thomas Betteridge - 2013 - Notre Dame, IN: University of Notre Dame Press.
    Thomas More is a complex and controversial figure who has been regarded as both saint and persecutor, leading humanist and a representative of late medieval culture. His religious writings, with their stark and at times violent attacks on what More regarded as heresy, have been hotly debated. In Writing Faith and Telling Tales, Thomas Betteridge sets More's writings in a broad cultural and chronological context, compares them to important works of late fourteenth- and fifteenth-century vernacular theology, and makes a compelling (...)
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  7. Αναζητώντας διεξόδους για την επιβίωση του Βυζαντίου: Η περίπτωση του Βησσαρίωνα (1403/8-1472) » [Searching for the Salvation of Byzantium: Bessarion’s case (1403/8-1472)].Athanasia Theodoropoulou - 2020 - Dia-Logos 10:203-223.
    Bessarion, bishop of Nicaea and later cardinal of the Roman Church, was one of the most significant figures of the fifteenth century. He devoted himself to preserving the Greek heritage, to uniting the Orthodox and Latin Churches, and to promoting a crusade against the Ottomans. The aim of this paper is to interpret Bessarion’s views concerning the salvation of Byzantium by giving an overview of his key works, orations and letters, focusing on the rise of the Ottomans: his Oratio dogmatica (...)
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  8. Możliwość niewiary u progu nowoczesności.Jakub Dadlez - 2018 - In Szymon Wróbel & Krzysztof Skonieczny (eds.), Ateizm. Próba dokończenia projektu. Warszawa, Polska: pp. 167-178.
    Po Kartezjuszu wątpienie w istnienie Boga staje się zwolna elementem systematycznego myślenia. Wiek XVII to wyjście z ostatniego po średniowieczu stulecia, „które chce wierzyć” (Lucien Febvre), początek rewolucji naukowej i wyzwolenia od chrześcijańskich dogmatów. Taka wizja zdaje się przekonująca, potwierdzają ją pełne religijnych odniesień przednowoczesne teksty – czy jednak trzymanie się ich litery i rozwijanie na ich podstawie historii mentalności nie jest pochopne? Czy myślenie bez odwołania do Boga to specyficzne osiągnięcie nowoczesności? Polskie ujęcie filozofii wczesnonowożytnej spod znaku Leszka Kołakowskiego, (...)
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  9. "Medieval Mystics on Persons: What John Locke Didn’T Tell You".Christina VanDyke - 2019 - In Persons: a History. Oxford: pp. 123-153.
    The 13th-15th centuries were witness to lively and broad-ranging debates about the nature of persons. In this paper, I look at how the uses of ‘person’ in logical/grammatical, legal/political, and theological contexts overlap in the works of 13th-15th century contemplatives in the Latin West, such as Hadewijch, Meister Eckhart, and Catherine of Siena. After explicating the key concepts of individuality, dignity, and rationality, I show how these ideas combine with the contemplative use of first- and second-person perspectives, personification, and introspection (...)
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  10. Kritik über Fidora, Niederberger & Scattola (2013): Phronesis – Prudentia – Klugheit. Das Wissen des Klugen in Mittelalter, Renaissance und Neuzeit.Stefan Düfel - 2014 - Bochumer Philosophisches Jahrbuch Fur Antike Und Mittelalter 17 (1):260-262.
  11. Review of Monaco (2010): Deus Trinitas. Dio Come Non Altro Nel Pensiero di Nicolò Cusano. [REVIEW]Max Rohstock - 2012 - Bochumer Philosophisches Jahrbuch Fur Antike Und Mittelalter 15 (1):298-300.
  12. Kritik Über Vasoli & Pissavino (2002): Le Filosofie Del Rinascimento.Paolo Rubini - 2006 - Bochumer Philosophisches Jahrbuch Fur Antike Und Mittelalter 11 (1):271-283.
  13. Kritik Über Vasoli & Pissavino (2002): Le Filosofie Del Rinascimento.Paolo Rubini - 2006 - Bochumer Philosophisches Jahrbuch Fur Antike Und Mittelalter 11 (1):271-283.
  14. Review of Cusa, Bond & Watanabe (1997): Selected Spiritual Writings. [REVIEW]Markus L. Führer - 1997 - Bochumer Philosophisches Jahrbuch Fur Antike Und Mittelalter 2 (1):297-300.
  15. Review of Cusa, Bond & Watanabe (1997): Selected Spiritual Writings. [REVIEW]Markus L. Führer - 1997 - Bochumer Philosophisches Jahrbuch Fur Antike Und Mittelalter 2 (1):297-300.
  16. Kritik über Thurner (2001): Gott als das offenbare Geheimnis nach Nikolaus von Kues.Karl-Hermann Kandler - 2002 - Bochumer Philosophisches Jahrbuch Fur Antike Und Mittelalter 7 (1):267-272.
  17. Kritik über Thurner (2001): Gott als das offenbare Geheimnis nach Nikolaus von Kues.Karl-Hermann Kandler - 2002 - Bochumer Philosophisches Jahrbuch Fur Antike Und Mittelalter 7 (1):267-272.
  18. On Methods, Volume 2: Books III-IV. On Regressus.Jacopo Zabarella & John P. McCaskey - 2014 - Harvard University Press.
    Jacopo Zabarella’s two treatises On Methods and On Regressus (1578) are among the most important Renaissance discussions of how scientific knowledge should be acquired, arranged, and transmitted. They belong to a lively debate about the order in which sciences should be taught and the method to be followed in scientific demonstration that roiled the Late Renaissance world for decades. In these famous works Zabarella rejected the views of Ramists and modern Galenists in favor of the pure doctrine of Aristotle, freed (...)
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  19. On Methods, Volume 1: Books I-II.Jacopo Zabarella & John P. McCaskey - 2014 - Harvard University Press.
    Jacopo Zabarella’s two treatises On Methods and On Regressus (1578) are among the most important Renaissance discussions of how scientific knowledge should be acquired, arranged, and transmitted. They belong to a lively debate about the order in which sciences should be taught and the method to be followed in scientific demonstration that roiled the Late Renaissance world for decades. In these famous works Zabarella rejected the views of Ramists and modern Galenists in favor of the pure doctrine of Aristotle, freed (...)
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  20. The Book of the City of Ladies.Christine De Pizan - 2000 - Penguin Classics.
    Christine de Pisan (circa 1364–1430) was born in Italy and came to France at the age of four with her father. Arguably the first woman in Europe to earn a living as an author, she is widely regarded as an early feminist who spoke out for the rights of women and espoused female achievement. She wrote poems and prose texts that were often allegorical and philosophical and that reflected her own original and engaged personality. She prepared the books with the (...)
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  21. How Mind, Logic and Language, Have Evolved From Medieval Philosophy to Early Modern Philosophy? A Critical Study.Mudasir A. Tantray - 2018 - World Wide Journal of Multidisciplinary Research and Development 4 (5):222-229.
    This paper determines the state of mind, logic and language in medieval philosophy. It also exhibits the journey from medieval to early modern philosophy. In medieval philosophy, concept of mind was intimately connected soul or spirit with its harmony with religious tradition. Logic and language as well were corresponding with religion and faith. However in early modern philosophy the schema of mind, logic and language were different. These concepts were bailed from the clutches of religious dogmatism and faith towards the (...)
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  22. Listening, Phronein and the First Principle of Happiness.Pablo Muruzábal Lamberti - forthcoming - In Walter Omar Kohan & Barbara Weber (eds.), On Childhood, Thinking and Time: Educating Responsibly. Lanham, MD 20706, USA:
  23. Lutero, Descartes y Rousseau: la autonomía del espíritu humano.Leopoldo José Prieto Lopez - 2008 - Ecclesia: Revista de Cultura Católica 22 (2):205-215.
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  24. Oratio de hominis dignitate = Mowa o godności człowieka.Giovanni Pico Della Mirandola, Zbigniew Nerczuk, Mikołaj Olszewski & Danilo Facca - 2010 - Warsaw: Wydawnictwo IFiS PAN.
    To początkowy fragment mowy O godności człowieka Pico della Mirandoli." Wstępem poprzedział Danilo Facca, przełożyli Zbigniew Nerczuk i Mikołaj Olszewski. -/- This is an excerpt from the Polish translation of Pico della Mirandola's De dignitate hominis. The preface to the translation by Danilo Facca. Translation by Zbigniew Nerczuk and Mikołaj Olszewski.
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  25. 'But Following the Literal Sense, the Jews Refuse to Understand': Hermeneutic Conflicts in the Nicholas of Cusa's De Pace Fidei.Jason Aleksander - 2014 - American Cusanus Society Newsletter 31:13-19.
    In the midst of the De pace fidei’s imagined heavenly conference on the theme of the possibility of religious harmony, Nicholas of Cusa has Saint Peter acknowledge to the Persian interlocutor that it will be difficult to bring Jews to the acceptance of Christ’s divine nature because they refuse to accept the implicit meaning of their own history of revelation. What is peculiar about this line in the dialogue is not merely that it flies in the face of what Cusanus (...)
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  26. Time, History, and Providence in the Philosophy of Nicholas of Cusa.Jason Aleksander - 2014 - Mirabilia 19 (2).
    Although Nicholas of Cusa occasionally discussed how the universe must be understood as the unfolding of the absolutely infinite in time, he left open questions about any distinction between natural time and historical time, how either notion of time might depend upon the nature of divine providence, and how his understanding of divine providence relates to other traditional philosophical views. From texts in which Cusanus discussed these questions, this paper will attempt to make explicit how Cusanus understood divine providence. The (...)
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  27. Nicholas of Cusa.Jason Aleksander - 2016 - Oxford Bibliographies in Medieval Studies.
    Given the significance of Nicholas of Cusa’s ecclesiastical career, it is no surprise that a good deal of academic attention on Nicholas has focused on his role in the history of the church. Nevertheless, it would also be fair to say that a good deal of the attention that is focused on the life and thought of Nicholas of Cusa is the legacy of prior generations of scholars who saw in his theoretical work an opportunity to define the most salient (...)
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  28. Faith as Poeisis in Nicholas of Cusa's Pursuit of Wisdom.Jason Aleksander - 2018 - In Thomas Izbicki, Jason Aleksander & Donald Duclow (eds.), Nicholas of Cusa in Ages of Transition. Leiden: E. J. Brill. pp. 197-218.
    This article discusses how Nicholas of Cusa’s speculative philosophy harbors an ecumenical spirit that is deeply entwined and in tension with his commitment to incarnational mystical theology. On the basis of my discussion of this tension, I intend to show that Nicholas understands “faith” as a poietic activity whose legitimacy is rooted less in the independent veracity of the beliefs in question than in the potential of particular religious conventions to aid intellectual processes of self-interpretation. In undertaking this analysis, the (...)
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  29. “Azioni in Modo L’Una Dall’Altra”: Action for Action's Sake in Machiavelli's The Prince : [Political Action, Machiavelli, Virtù and Fortuna, The Prince, Political Causality].Charles D. Tarlton - 2003 - History of European Ideas 29 (2):123-140.
    It has come to be increasingly recognized that The Prince fails to offer a viable and practical guide to successful political action. Violent force provides Machiavelli's theory with the only even tentative form of purposive action he can theoretically sustain. In violence, elements of the action itself seem to appear as consequences, thus restoring a semblance of connection between deliberate action and outcomes. As a result, successful political action becomes less a question of examples and precepts than a matter of (...)
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  30. Giovanni Pico Della Mirandola, Über Das Seiende Und Das Eine. De Ente Et Uno.Paul Richard Blum, Gregor Damschen, Dominic Kaegi, Martin Mulsow, Enno Rudolph & Alejandro G. Vigo - 2006 - Hamburg: Meiner.
    This edition of Giovanni Pico della Mirandola’s “De ente et uno” (“On being and the one”) offers for the first time a key text for the reformation of metaphysics in Renaissance philosophy in German translation. The Latin text is added. The detailed introduction and careful commentary reveal the guiding points Pico has set with this work.
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  31. Meredith K. Ray, Daughters of Alchemy. Women and Scientific Culture in Early Modern Italy (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 2015). [REVIEW]Maria Vittoria Comacchi - 2016 - Philosophical Readings 8 (2):121-124.
  32. Andrew D. Berns, The Bible and Natural Philosophy in Renaissance Italy. Jewish and Christian Physicians in Search of Truth (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2014). [REVIEW]Maria Vittoria Comacchi - 2015 - Philosophical Readings 7 (3):61-63.
  33. Der Philosophiebegriff im florentinischen Renaissanceplatonismus.Jens Lemanski - 2016 - Archiv für Begriffsgeschichte 58:9-44.
    The paper examines the definitions of the concept ‘philosophy’ resp. ‘the philosopher’ in Florentine renaissance Platonism, namely Marsilio Ficino and his scholar Francesco di Zanobi Cattani da Diacceto. Following Socrates and Pythagoras, Ficino distinguishes between mundane philosophy and divine sapientia. In contrast to his teacher, Diacceto’s Aristotelism rejects the Pythagoreanism and connects philosophy with sapientia. In order to show how the differences between Ficino and Diacceto emerge, three more contemporaries are taken into consideration: Christoforo Landino, Angelo Poliziano and Giovanni Pico (...)
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  34. Bruno's Trial. [REVIEW]Paul O. Kristeller - 1947 - Journal of the History of Ideas 8 (2):240.
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  35. Moderation and Its Discontents: Recent Work on Renaissance WomenVirtue of Necessity: English Women's Writing, 1649-1688Women of the RenaissanceOppositional Voices: Women as Writers and Translators of Literature in the English RenaissanceWriting Women in Jacobean England. [REVIEW]Margaret W. Ferguson, Elaine Hobby, Margaret L. King, Tina Krontiris & Barbara Kiefer Lewalski - 1994 - Feminist Studies 20 (2):349.
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  36. Essay Review: Science in its Context: Science, Medicine and Society in the Renaissance: Essays to Honor Walter PagelScience, Medicine and Society in the Renaissance: Essays to Honor Walter Pagel. Edited by DebusAllen G. . Pp. 275 + 338. $50.00.Frances A. Yates - 1973 - History of Science 11 (4):286-291.
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  37. Essay Review: In Search of Thomas Harriot: Thomas Harriot: Renaissance ScientistThomas Harriot: Renaissance Scientist. Edited by ShirleyJ. W. . Pp. X + 181. 4 Plates. £6·50.Derek Thomas Whiteside - 1975 - History of Science 13 (1):61-70.
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  38. Special Section: Lorenzo Simpson' s The Unfinished Project: Sensibilities in Conflict: The Thought of Lorenzo Simpson.Robert Gooding-Williams - 2007 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 33 (3):275-287.
    In the remarks that follow I concentrate on Lorenzo Simpson's two books, Technology, Time and the Conversations of Modernity and The Unfinished Project: Toward a Postmetaphysical Humanism. Common to both works — what unites them, I believe — is a philosophical orientation that has been deeply influenced by Gadamerian hermeneutics. I begin with a discussion of UP.
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  39. Book Review: The Scientific RenaissanceThe Scientific Renaissance1450–1630. BoasMarie . Pp. 380. 30s. [REVIEW]William P. D. Wightman - 1963 - History of Science 2 (1):160-161.
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  40. Early Modern Atheism and Renaissance Philosophy: The Play of Paratexts inTheophrastus Redivivusand Pomponazzi'sDe Immortalitate.Gianni Paganini - 2016 - Intellectual History Review 26 (1):25-31.
  41. The Philosophy of Gemistos Plethon: Platonism in Late Byzantium, Between Hellenism and Orthodoxy. [REVIEW]Demetrios Dedes - 2017 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 25 (1):203-205.
  42. António Manuel Martins, lógica E ontologia em Pedro da Fonseca. [REVIEW]António Pedro Mesquita - 1994 - Philosophica 4:172-176.
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  43. The 'Scholastic' Theology of Giovanni Pico Della Mirandola - Between Biblical Faith and Academic Skepticism.Amos Edelheit - 2007 - Recherches de Theologie Et Philosophie Medievales 74 (2):523-570.
    This article examines Giovanni Pico della Mirandola’s detailed reaction against the condemnation of some of his famous Theses by a papal commission, through a careful reading of his Apology of 1487. This text, which was never studied in detail and still waits for a critical edition, reflects Pico’s remarkable familiarity with the scholastic thinkers up to his own times. As part of his self-defense, Pico deals with the relation between opinions and faith, probable knowledge and certain truth, philosophy and theology, (...)
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  44. David B. Ruderman, "Kabbalah, Magic and Science: The Cultural Universe of a Sixteenth-Century Jewish Physician". [REVIEW]Richard H. Popkin - 1991 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 29 (3):488.
  45. Antonio Antonaci, "Francesco Storella: Filosofo Salentino Del Cinquecento". [REVIEW]Charles B. Schmitt - 1970 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 8 (1):101.
  46. Walter Pagel, "Religion and Neoplatonism in Renaissance Medicine". [REVIEW]John Scarborough - 1988 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 26 (2):318.
  47. Michael J. B. Allen, "The Platonism of Marsilio Ficino. A Study of His "Phaedrus" Commentary, Its Sources and Genesis". [REVIEW]Jill Kraye - 1987 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 25 (4):596.
  48. Renzo Raggiunti, "Logica E Linguistica Nel Pensiero de Guido Calogero". [REVIEW]Herbert Wallace Schneider - 1965 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 3 (1):140.
  49. Maurice Crosland, Ed., "The Emergence of Science in Western Europe". [REVIEW]Peter K. Machamer - 1979 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 17 (3):341.
  50. Michael J. B. Allen, Ed., "Marsilio Ficino and the Phaedran Charioteer: Introduction, Texts, Translations". [REVIEW]Frederick Purnell - 1984 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 22 (1):119.