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  1. A Review of Alexander Broadie's A History of Scottish Philosophy. [REVIEW]Elena Yi-Jia Zeng - 2018 - NTU Philosophical Review 56:177-202.
    Scottish philosophy and intellectual history have become the increasingly fashionable fields of academic studies. Alexander Broadie, one of the pioneers and an accomplished scholar of the Scottish Enlightenment, returns to the basic question, namely, “what is Scottish philosophy?”, and presents a comprehensive work on the history of Scottish philosophy. Broadie successfully elucidates the nature and significance of Scottish philosophy both historically and philosophically. He argues that Scottish philosophy must be studied in its historical context, for it is not only a (...)
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  2. Arsehole Aristocracy.Christopher Brooke - 2018 - European Journal of Political Theory 17 (4):391-410.
    The 18th-century French political theorist the Baron de Montesquieu described honour as the ‘principle’ – or animating force – of a well-functioning monarchy, which he thought the appropriate regime type for an economically unequal society extended over a broad territory. Existing literature often presents this honour in terms of lofty ambition, the desire for preference and distinction, a spring for political agency or a spur to the most admirable kind of conduct in public life and the performance of great deeds. (...)
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  3. A Itália Política Do Século XVII Vista Por Olhos portuguesesThe Political Italy of the 18th Century Seen Through Portuguese Eyes.Abreu Alberto Antunes de - 2006 - Cultura:231-244.
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  4. Wollstonecraft and the Political Value of Contempt.Ross Carroll - 2015 - European Journal of Political Theory 18 (1):1474885115593762.
    In her Vindication of the Rights of Men, Mary Wollstonecraft accused Edmund Burke of having contempt for his political opponents. Yet she herself expressed contempt for Burke and did so unapologetically. Readers have long regarded Wollstonecraft’s decision to match Burke’s contempt with one of her own as either a tactical blunder or evidence that she sought merely to ridicule Burke rather than argue with him. I offer an interpretation and defence of Wollstonecraft's rhetorical choices by situating the Vindication within eighteenth-century (...)
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  5. Harmony in Spinoza and His Critics.Timothy Yenter - 2018 - In Beth Lord (ed.), Spinoza's Philosophy of Ratio. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press.
    Spinoza is in a potentially untenable position. On the one hand, he argues that those who claim to see harmony in the universe are badly mistaken; they are falsely imagining rather than properly reasoning. On the other hand, harmony is positively discussed in his ethical writings and even serves as the basis for his vision of society. How can both be maintained? In this chapter l argue that this prima facie conflict between the two treatments of harmony is resolvable, but (...)
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  6. The Sources of the Encyclopedia Article on Justice: A Reply to Professor Thielemann.Burns Tony - 1986 - Diderot Studies 22:27-40.
  7. Descartes, The Concept of Woman and the French Revolution.Sr Prudence Allen - 1990 - Social Philosophy Today 3:61-78.
  8. On Galileo’s Letter to the Grand Duchess Christina.Mavaddat Javid - 2007 - Academia.Edu.
    Far from egalitarian, Galileo’s epistemology asserts an uncompromising hierarchy between science and Scripture — an idea he suggests originates with early Christian author Tertullian of Carthage. For Galileo, when the scientific data causes us to disagree with the apparent meaning of scripture, it is not the data that we discard nor is it the scientist whose word is subject to doubt. Rather, whenever a disagreement arises, we always reinterpret the Bible and Holy Fathers such that we can make them agree (...)
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  9. Catharine Macaulay’s Republican Conception of Social and Political Liberty.Alan M. S. J. Coffee - 2018 - Political Studies 4 (65):844-59.
    Catharine Macaulay was one of the most significant republican writers of her generation. Although there has been a revival of interest in Macaulay amongst feminists and intellectual historians, neo-republican writers have yet to examine the theoretical content of her work in any depth. Since she anticipates and addresses a number of themes that still preoccupy republicans, this neglect represents a serious loss to the discipline. I examine Macaulay’s conception of freedom, showing how she uses the often misunderstood notion of virtue (...)
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  10. Inventing the French Revolution: Essays on French Political Culture in the Eighteenth Century.Keith Michael Baker - 1990 - Cambridge University Press.
    How did the French Revolution become thinkable? Keith Michael Baker, a leading authority on the ideological origins of the French Revolution, explores this question in his wide-ranging collection of essays. Analyzing the new politics of contestation that transformed the traditional political culture of the Old Regime during its last decades, Baker revises our historical map of the political space in which the French Revolution took form. Some essays study the ways in which the revolutionaries' break with the past was prepared (...)
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  11. Inventing the French Revolution `: Essays on French Political Culture in the Eighteenth Century.Keith Michael Baker - 1990 - Cambridge University Press.
    How did the French Revolution become thinkable? Keith Michael Baker, a leading authority on the ideological origins of the French Revolution, explores this question in his wide-ranging collection of essays. Analyzing the new politics of contestation that transformed the traditional political culture of the Old Regime during its last decades, Baker revises our historical map of the political space in which the French Revolution took form. Some essays study the ways in which the revolutionaries' break with the past was prepared (...)
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  12. Seventeenth-Century Political Arithmetic: Civil Strife and Vital Statistics.Peter Buck - 1977 - Isis 68 (1):67-84.
  13. Beyond Denial and Exclusion: The History of Relations Between Christians and Muslims in the Cape Colony During the 17th-18th Centuries with Lessons for a Post-Colonial Theology of Religions. [REVIEW]Jaco Beyers - 2016 - Hts Theological Studies 72 (1):01-10.
    Learning from the past prepares one for being able to cope with the future. History is made up of strings of relationships. This article follows a historical line from colonialism, through apartheid to post-colonialism in order to illustrate inter-religious relations in South-Africa and how each context determines these relations. Social cohesion is enhanced by a post-colonial theology of religions based on the current context. By describing the relationship between Christians and Muslims during the 17th-18th centuries in the Cape Colony, lessons (...)
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  14. Ideologies.Dustin Garlitz - 2014 - In Sherwood Thompson (ed.), Encyclopedia of Diversity and Social Justice. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
  15. Edmund Burke, the Imperatives of Empire and the American Revolution.H. G. Callaway - 2016 - Cambridge Scholar's Publishing.
    Book Description -/- Edmund Burke (1730-1797) was a friend and advocate of America during the political crisis of the 1760s and the 1770s, and he spoke out eloquently and forcefully in defense of the rights of the colonial subjects of the British empire—in America, Ireland and India alike. However, he is often best remembered for his extremely critical Reflections on the Revolution in France. The present volume is based on classic Burke, including his most famous writings and speeches on the (...)
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  16. Multitude.Ericka Tucker - 2015 - In Andre Santos Campos (ed.), Spinoza: Basic Concepts. Imprint Academic. pp. 129-141.
    Spinoza’s ‘multitude’, while a key concept of his political philosophy, allows us to better understand Spinoza’s work both in its historical context and as a systematic unity. In this piece, I will propose that we understand Spinoza’s concept of the ‘multitude’ in the context of the development of his political thought, in particular his reading and interpretation of Thomas Hobbes, for whom ‘multitude’ was indeed a technical term. I will show that Spinoza develops his own notion of multitude as an (...)
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  17. The Invisible Foole.Peter Vanderschraaf - 2010 - Philosophical Studies 147 (1):37-58.
    I review the classic skeptical challenges of Foole in Leviathan and the Lydian Shepherd in Republic against the prudential rationality of justice. Attempts to meet these challenges contribute to the reconciliation project (Kavka in Hobbesian moral and political theory , 1986 ) that tries to establish that morality is compatible with rational prudence. I present a new Invisible Foole challenge against the prudential rationality of justice. Like the Lydian Shepherd, the Invisible Foole can violate justice offensively (Kavka, Hobbesian moral and (...)
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  18. Why Can’T We All Just Get Along: The Reasonable Vs. The Rational According to Spinoza.Eugene Garver - 2010 - Political Theory 38 (6):838-858.
    Spinoza presents a picture of the good human life in which being rational and being reasonable or sociable are mutually supporting: the philosopher makes the best citizen, and citizenship is the best route to philosophy and adequate ideas. Crucial to this mutual implication are the roles of religion and politics in promoting obedience. It is through obedience that people can become "of one mind and one body" in the absence of adequate ideas, through the presence of shared empowering imaginations and (...)
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  19. UnParadoxical Hobbes.Deborah Baumgold - 2009 - Political Theory 37 (5):689-693.
  20. The Difficulties of Hobbes Interpretation.Deborah Baumgold - 2008 - Political Theory 36 (6):827-855.
    Idiosyncrasies of Hobbes's composition process, together with a paucity of reliable autobiographical materials and the norms of seventeenth-century manuscript production, render interpretation of his political theory particularly difficult and contentious. These difficulties are surveyed here under three headings: the process of "serial" composition, which was common in the period; the relationship between Hobbes's three political-theory texts-- the "Elements of Law, De Cive ", and "Leviathan", which is basic to defining the textual embodiment of his theory, and controversial; and his method (...)
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  21. A Note On "Reason" and "History" in Late Seventeenth Century Political Thought.Martyn P. Thompson - 1976 - Political Theory 4 (4):491-504.
  22. Pacifying Politics: Resistance, Violence, and Accountability in Seventeenth-Century Contract Theory.D. Baumgold - 1993 - Political Theory 21 (1):6-27.
  23. Eighteenth Century Intimations of Modernity.Michael J. Shapiro - 1993 - Political Theory 21 (2):273-293.
  24. Allegiance and Jurisdiction in Locke's Doctrine of Tacit Consent.Julian H. Franklin - 1996 - Political Theory 24 (3):407-422.
  25. Echoes of Narcisse.M. E. Brint - 1988 - Political Theory 16 (4):617-635.
  26. What We Own Before Property: Hugo Grotius and the Suum.Alejandra Mancilla - 2015 - Grotiana 36 (1):63-77.
    _ Source: _Volume 36, Issue 1, pp 63 - 77 At the basis of modern natural law theories, the concept of the _suum_, i.e. what belongs to the person, has received little scholarly attention despite its importance both in explaining and justifying not only the genealogy of property, but also that of morality and war. In this essay I focus on Grotius’s account of the _suum_ and examine what it is, what things it includes, what rights it gives rise to, (...)
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  27. The Beast and the Sovereign, Volume I.Geoffrey Bennington (ed.) - 2009 - University of Chicago Press.
    When he died in 2004, Jacques Derrida left behind a vast legacy of unpublished material, much of it in the form of written lectures. With _The Beast and the Sovereign, Volume 1_, the University of Chicago Press inaugurates an ambitious series, edited by Geoffrey Bennington and Peggy Kamuf, translating these important works into English. _The Beast and the Sovereign, Volume 1_ launches the series with Derrida’s exploration of the persistent association of bestiality or animality with sovereignty. In this seminar from (...)
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  28. A History of Women's Political Thought in Europe, 1700–1800.Karen Green - 2014 - Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
    During the eighteenth century, elite women participated in the philosophical, scientific, and political controversies that resulted in the overthrow of monarchy, the reconceptualisation of marriage, and the emergence of modern, democratic institutions. In this comprehensive study, Karen Green outlines and discusses the ideas and arguments of these women, exploring the development of their distinctive and contrasting political positions, and their engagement with the works of political thinkers such as Hobbes, Locke, Mandeville and Rousseau. Her exploration ranges across Europe from England (...)
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  29. Rousseau: The Sentiment of Existence.David Gauthier - 2006 - Cambridge University Press.
    Rousseau is often portrayed as an educational and social reformer whose aim was to increase individual freedom. In this volume David Gauthier examines Rousseau's evolving notion of freedom, where he focuses on a single quest: can freedom and the independent self be regained? Rousseau's first answer is given in Emile, where he seeks to create a self-sufficient individual, neither materially nor psychologically enslaved to others. His second is in the Social Contract, where he seeks to create a citizen who identifies (...)
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  30. "Democracy Is So Overrated": The Shortcomings of Popular Rule.Brendan Shea - 2016 - In J. Edward Hackett (ed.), House of Cards and Philosophy: Underwood's Republic. Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 141-152.
    As modern viewers, it is tempting to interpret Frank and Claire’s manipulations of democratic institutions as representing perversions or distortions of democratic ideals. After all, most of us think (or at least hope!) that real-world democracies we actually live in aren’t quite that badly governed. Whatever the moral faults of our leaders are, they don’t (as a rule) murder journalists, crudely provoke international crises for political gain, or cleverly set up their political adversaries with Bond-villain-like cunning. Real politicians, so the (...)
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  31. Nietzsche, Feminism, and Political Theory.Paul Patton (ed.) - 1993 - Routledge.
    _Are you visiting women? Do not forget your whip!' '_Thus Spoke Zarathustra__ _'the democratic movement is...a form assumed by man in decay' _Beyond Good and Evil Nietzsche's views on women and politics have long been the most embarrassing aspects of his thought. Why then has the work of Nietzsche aroused so much interest in recent years from feminist theorists and political philosophers? In answer, this collection comprises twelve outsanding essays on Mietzsche 's work to current debates in feminist and political (...)
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  32. Imagination, Prophecy, and Morality: The Relevance and Limits of Spinoza's Theory of Political Myth.J. Brennan - 2014 - Télos 2014 (169):64-83.
    Myth presents us with two major problems: definition and usage. In this paper I focus on the latter problem and argue in defense of Spinoza’s theory of political myth as opposed to the dichotomy of “myth as progress” and “myth as regression.” Spinoza’s theory is preferable because it allows for a full-bodied understanding of myth, its legitimate uses and its dangers for slipping into superstition. Because myth plays on the imagination, the basest form of knowledge available to all people and (...)
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  33. Submission and Subjection in Leviathan: Good Subjects in the Hobbesian Commonwealth.Michael Byron - 2015 - Palgrave-Macmillan.
    In Leviathan, Thomas Hobbes famously characterizes the state of nature as a predicament in which life is “solitary, poor, nasty, brutish, and short.” The only means of escape from that dire condition is to found the commonwealth, with its notorious sovereign. Hobbes invests the sovereign with virtually absolute power over the poor subjects of the commonwealth, and that vast and unlimited sovereign has drawn the reader’s eye for 350 years. -/- Yet Hobbes has a great deal to say about subjects (...)
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  34. The Right of Necessity: Moral Cosmopolitanism and Global Poverty.Alejandra Mancilla - 2016 - Rowman & Littlefield International.
    What does the basic right to subsistence allow its holders to do for themselves when it goes unfulfilled? This book guides the reader through the morality of infringing property rights for subsistence, in a global context.
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  35. Challenging the State: Teaching Alternative Historiographies in Early Modern Politics.Jacob Affolter - 2015 - Metaphilosophy 46 (3):398-413.
    This article argues that we can improve the way we teach early modern political philosophy if we introduce students to alternative views about the development of the state. First, it summarizes the work of contemporary philosophers and historians who are critical of the modern state. Second, it points out ways in which early social contract theorists take the state for granted. Third, it argues that alternative views about the development of the state can help students take a more critical perspective (...)
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  36. Grotius and Aristotle: The Justice of Taking Too Little.Andrew Blom - 2016 - History of Political Thought 36 (1):84-112.
    The theory of justice that Hugo Grotius developed in De Jure Belli ac Pacis (The Law of War and Peace, 1625) set itself against a certain reading of Aristotle, according to which justice is conceived of as a mean between taking too much and taking too little. I argue that we can best understand the implications of Grotius' mature conception by considering the ends to which he had deployed this Aristotelian notion in his earlier work. Grotius came to perceive that (...)
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  37. Francisco Suarez.C. Faraco - 2014 - Heliopolis.
  38. Rousseau e l'educazione del cittadino.Marcello Ostinelli - 2014 - Civitas Educationis. Education, Politics and Culture 3 (1):165-184.
    This paper examines the idea of education of the citizen derived from the texts of Rousseau, with particular attention to the role assigned to patriotism and civil religion. With respect to patriotic education, I critically question Rousseau's thesis about the incompatibility between love of one’s country and a sense of humanity, contrasting them with the idea of constitutional patriotism, founded on loyalty to universal values. I conclude with an examination of the idea that a civil religion constitutes an essential contribution (...)
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  39. Citizens for the Fatherland Education, Educators, and Pedagogical Ideals in Eighteenth Century Russia.J. L. Black & Elizabeth Gorky - 1979
  40. The Idea of Order: Enlightened Revisions.Andreas Dorschel - 2012 - Archiv für Rechts-Und Sozialphilosophie 98 (2):185-196.
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  41. The Bourgeoisie in 18th Century France.Elinor G. Barber, Frank E. Manuel, Alexander Herzen, Jean J. Joughin, Aaron Noland & Val R. Lorwin - 1957 - Science and Society 21 (3):264-272.
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  42. The German Policy of Revolutionary France. A Study of French Diplomacy During the War of the First Coalition, 1792-1797.Sydney Seymour Biro, Albert Soboul, George Rudé & Kare D. Tønnesson - 1959 - Science and Society 23 (4):333-351.
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  43. The Ordeal of Thomas Hutchinson.Bernard Bailyn - 1977 - Science and Society 41 (4):485-488.
  44. Venice and Amsterdam: A Study of Seventeenth-Century Elites.Peter Burke & Frederic C. Lane - 1976 - Science and Society 40 (2):247-249.
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  45. Czech and Slovak Thought in the Second Half of the Eighteenth Century.Robert Auty & Colloquio Slavistico - 1962 - G.C. Sansoni.
  46. Civil Religion and Anticlericalism in James Harrington.Ronald Beiner - 2014 - European Journal of Political Theory 13 (4):388-407.
    In the last few years, there has been a notable surge of interest in the themes of civil religion and the battle against “priestcraft” among historians of political thought. Examples include Eric Nelson’s The Hebrew Republic; Paul Rahe’s Against Throne and Altar; Jeffrey Collins’s The Allegiance of Thomas Hobbes; Jonathan Israel’s work on the legacy of Spinoza; Justin Champion’s work on John Toland; and my own book, Civil Religion. Within the intellectual space created by this recent scholarship, this article focuses (...)
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  47. Grotius, Hugo.Andrew Blom - 2014 - Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Hugo Grotius (1583—1645) Hugo Grotius was a Dutch humanist and jurist whose philosophy of natural law had a major impact on the development of seventeenth century political thought and on the moral theories of the Enlightenment. Valorized by contemporary international theorists as the father of international law, his work on sovereignty, international rights of commerce […].
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  48. Why Hobbes Cannot Limit the Leviathan: A Critical Commentary on Larry May's Limiting Leviathan.Marcus Arvan - 2014 - Hobbes Studies 27 (2):171-177.
    This commentary contends that Larry May’s Hobbesian argument for limitations on sovereignty and lawmaking in Limiting Leviathan does not succeed. First, I show that Hobbes begins with a plausible instrumental theory of normativity. Second, I show that Hobbes then attempts, unsuccessfully—by his own lights—to defend a kind of non-instrumental, moral normativity. Thus, I contend, in order to successfully “limit the Leviathan” of the state, the Hobbesian must provide a sound instrumental argument in favor of the sovereign limiting their actions and (...)
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  49. Responses to Vulnerability: Medicine, Politics and the Body in Descartes and Spinoza.Amy Schmitter - 2012 - In Stephen Pender & Nancy S. Struever (eds.), Rhetoric and Medicine in Early Modern Europe. Ashgate Publishing. pp. 147-171.
  50. Following Orders: Deliberate Defeat at the Little Bighorn.Monette Bebow-Reinhard - 2014 - SOCRATES 2 (1):50-75.
    The battle of Little Bighorn in 1876 marked the beginning of the end of conflict between the U.S. and its military against the various Native American tribes west of the Mississippi River. Historians have given us various ideas of why Lieutenant Colonel Custer met with defeat. But none have noted, in connection with the November 3rd “secret meeting” between Grant and his generals, a movement of troops away from the Black Hills even before decisions were supposedly made to no longer (...)
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