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  1. William Whewell: A Composite Portrait.James W. Allard - 1992 - Philosophical Books 33 (3):144-146.
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  2. Religion and the Reflective Self: Coleridge's Platonism Revisited.Leslie Armour - 2002 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 10 (3):467 – 475.
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  3. Mr. Abbott and Professor Fraser: A Nineteenth Century Debate About Berkeleys Theory of Vision.Margaret Atherton - 2003 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 85 (1):21-50.
  4. Self-Concern From Priestley to Hazlitt.John Barresi & Raymond Martin - 2003 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 11 (3):499 – 507.
    himself or a proper object of his egoistic self-concern. Hazlitt concluded that belief in personal identity must be an acquired imaginary conception and that since in reality each of us is no more related to his or her future self than to the future self of any other person none of us is 2 ‘.
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  5. The Idealist Tradition. [REVIEW]J. D. Bastable - 1958 - Philosophical Studies 8:197-199.
  6. Inquisitio Philosophica: An Examination of the Principles of Kant and Hamilton.M. P. W. Bolton - 1866 - Routledge/Thoemmes Press.
    Facsim of ed. published: London : Chapman and Hall, 1866.
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  7. Human Nature, Free Will, and the Human Sciences. [REVIEW]Francesca Bordogna - 2014 - Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 105 (1):161-163.
    Free Will and the Human Sciences in Britain, 1870–1910, and Between Mind and Nature, both published in 2013, illustrate a claim dear to Roger Smith: namely, that history—including history of the human sciences—is central to the human sciences. Free Will charts a wide range of conceptions of the will, power, agency, activity, the self, and character, as well as causality, necessity, determinism, and materialism. Victorian physicians, physiologists, scientific and philosophical psychologists, and philosophers, as well as (though that is not the (...)
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  8. British Idealism.Thom Brooks - 2011 - Oxford Bibliographies Online.
    British idealism flourished in the late 19th century and early 20th centuries. It was a movement with a lasting influence on the social and political thought of its time in particular. British idealists helped popularize the work of Immanuel Kant and G. W. F. Hegel in the Anglophone world, but they also sought to use insights from the philosophies of Kant and Hegel to help create a new idealism to address the many pressing issues of the Victorian period in Britain (...)
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  9. William Whewell: Philosopher of Science, And: William Whewell: A Composite Portrait.Robert E. Butts - 1992 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 30 (4):621-623.
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  10. The Scotch Metaphysics: A Century of Enlightenment in Scotland.George Elder Davie - 2001 - Routledge.
    Focusing on the works of Thomas Reid, Dugald Stewart, Sir William Hamilton, Thomas Brown and James Frederick Ferrier, this book offers a definitive account of an important philosophical movement, and represents a ground-breaking contribution to scholarship in the area. Essential reading for philosophers or anyone with an interest in the history of philosophical thought.
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  11. Whewell, Necessity and The Inductive Sciences: A Philosophical-Systematic Survey.S. Ducheyne - 2009 - South African Journal of Philosophy 28 (4):333-358.
    In this paper Whewell’s concept of necessity is scrutinized and its historical development is outlined (ca. 1833-1860). Particular attention will be paid to how Whewell interpreted the laws of the inductive sciences as being necessary since the laws of nature are concretizations of the Fundamental Ideas which can be partially described by Axioms.
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  12. Whewell's Tidal Researches: Scientific Practice and Philosophical Methodology.Steffen Ducheyne - 2010 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 41 (1):26-40.
    Primarily between 1833 and 1840, Whewell attempted to accomplish what natural philosophers and scientists since at least Galileo had failed to do: to provide a systematic and broad-ranged study of the tides and to attempt to establish a general scientific theory of tidal phenomena. In the essay at hand, I document the close interaction between Whewell’s philosophy of science (especially his methodological views) and his scientific practice as a tidologist. I claim that the intertwinement between Whewell’s methodology and his tidology (...)
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  13. Whewell on Necessity. A Study of its Development (William Whewell).Steffen Ducheyne - 2007 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 69 (2):239-265.
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  14. Review of William Mander's 'The Oxford Handbook of British Philosophy in the Nineteenth Century'. [REVIEW]Jeremy Dunham - 2014 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 201409.
  15. Was James Ward a Cambridge Pragmatist?Jeremy Dunham - 2014 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 22 (3):557-581.
    Although the Cambridge Professor of Mental Philosophy and Logic James Ward was once one of Britain's most highly regarded Psychologists and Philosophers, today his work is unjustly neglected. This is because his philosophy is frequently misrepresented as a reactionary anti-naturalistic idealist theism. In this article, I argue, first, that this reading is false, and that by viewing Ward through the lens of pragmatism we obtain a fresh interpretation of his work that highlights the scientific nature of his philosophy and his (...)
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  16. Prawdziwie darwinowska etyka.Andrzej Elzanowski - 2010 - Lectiones Et Acroases Philosophicae 3:13-57.
    True Darwinian Ethics -/- Darwin’s model for the evolution of morality as presented in Descent of Man (1871) is shown to comprise three major stages that are here referred to as empathic premorality, tribal morality, and universalizing morality. Empathy, the key component of Darwin’s “social instincts” that started moral evolution, is here recognized as the principal cognitive device that conveys epistemic credibility to moral agency. The two constitutive elements of the tribal morality are conscience that Darwin conceived of as a (...)
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  17. Defining Science: William Whewell, Natural Knowledge, and Public Debate in Early Victorian Britain. Richard Yeo.Menachem Fisch - 1994 - Isis 85 (4):706-707.
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  18. ‘The Emergency Which Has Arrived’: The Problematic History of Nineteenth-Century British Algebra – a Programmatic Outline.Menachem Fisch - 1994 - British Journal for the History of Science 27 (3):247-276.
    More than any other aspect of the Second Scientific Revolution, the remarkable revitalization or British mathematics and mathematical physics during the first half of the nineteenth century is perhaps the most deserving of the name. While the newly constituted sciences of biology and geology were undergoing their first revolution, as it were, the reform of British mathematics was truly and self-consciously the story of a second coming of age. ‘Discovered by Fermat, cocinnated and rendered analytical by Newton, and enriched by (...)
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  19. William Whewell: A Composite Portrait.Menachem Fisch & Simon Schaffer (eds.) - 1991 - Clarendon Press.
    William Whewell was a giant of Victorian intellectual culture. His influence, whether recognized or forgotten, is palpable in areas as diverse as moral philosophy, mineralogy, architecture, the politics of education, physics, engineering, and theology. Recent studies of the place of the sciences in nineteenth-century Britain have repeatedly indicated the significance of Whewell's sweeping and critical proposals for a reformed account of scientific knowledge and moral values. -/- However, until now there has been no detailed study of the context and impact (...)
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  20. Building a Science of Animal Minds: Lloyd Morgan, Experimentation, and Morgan’s Canon.Simon Fitzpatrick & Grant Goodrich - forthcoming - Journal of the History of Biology.
    Conwy Lloyd Morgan (1852–1936) is widely regarded as the father of modern comparative psychology. Yet, Morgan initially had significant doubts about whether a genuine science of comparative psychology was even possible, only later becoming more optimistic about our ability to make reliable inferences about the mental capacities of non-human animals. There has been a fair amount of disagreement amongst scholars of Morgan’s work about the nature, timing, and causes of this shift in Morgan’s thinking. We argue that Morgan underwent two (...)
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  21. The Whewell-Mill Debate in a Nutshell.Malcolm Forster - manuscript
    What is induction? John Stuart Mill (1874, p. 208) defined induction as the operation of discovering and proving general propositions. William Whewell (in Butts, 1989, p. 266) agrees with Mill’s definition as far as it goes. Is Whewell therefore assenting to the standard concept of induction, which talks of inferring a generalization of the form “All As are Bs” from the premise that “All observed As are Bs”? Does Whewell agree, to use Mill’s example, that inferring “All humans are mortal” (...)
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  22. William Whewell (1794-1866).Malcolm Forster - manuscript
    Whewell, William (b Lancaster, England, 24 May 1794; d Cambridge, England, 6 March 1866) Born the eldest son of a carpenter, William Whewell rose to become Master of Trinity College, Cambridge and a central figure in Victorian science. After attending the grammar school at Heversham in Westmorland, Whewell entered Trinity College, Cambridge and graduated Second Wrangler. He became a Fellow of the College in 1817, took his M.A. degree in 1819, and his D.D. degree in 1844.
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  23. American Philosophy and the Romantic Tradition.Russell B. Goodman - 1990 - Cambridge University Press.
    Professional philosophers have tended either to shrug off American philosophy as negligible or derivative or to date American philosophy from the work of twentieth century analytical positivists such as Quine. Russell Goodman expands on the revisionist position developed by Stanley Cavell, that the most interesting strain of American thought proceeds not from Puritan theology or from empirical science but from a peculiarly American kind of Romanticism. This insight leads Goodman, through Cavell, back to Emerson and Thoreau and thence to William (...)
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  24. Providential Naturalism and Miracles: John Fearn's Critique of Scottish Philosophy.Giovanni B. Grandi - 2015 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 13 (1):75-94.
    According to Thomas Reid, the development of natural sciences following the model of Newton's Principia and Optics would provide further evidence for the belief in a provident God. This project was still supported by his student, Dugald Stewart, in the early nineteenth century. John Fearn , an early critic of the Scottish common sense school, thought that the rise of ‘infidelity’ in the wake of scientific progress had shown that the apologetic project of Reid and Stewart had failed. In reaction (...)
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  25. The Extension of Color Sensations: Reid, Stewart, and Fearn.Giovanni B. Grandi - 2014 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 41 (Supplement 1):51-79.
    It seems to be a consequence of Reid’s views on sensations that colour sensations are not extended nor are they arranged in figured patterns. Reid further claimed that ‘there is no sensation appropriated to visible figure.’ As I show, Reid tried to justify these controversial claims by appeal to Cheselden’s report of the experiences of a young man affected by severe cataracts, and by appeal to cases of perception of visible figure without colour. While holding fast to the principle that (...)
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  26. American Philosophy: ‘Scotch’ or ‘Teutonic’?John Haldane - 2002 - Philosophy 77 (3):311-329.
    Given as an address to the American Philosophical Association on the occasion of its centennial, this paper examines the character and standing of American philosophy now and at the outset of the twentieth century as seen (then and now) from a British point of view. A century ago Britain was itself the unquestioned leader of Anglo-Saxon thought. Now, however, as in so many areas, the US is the pre-eminent world power. This status brings prestige and various benefits but it also (...)
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  27. Darwin and Philosophy.Mark Hannam - manuscript
    A talk on the philosophical implications of Charles Darwin's work.
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  28. Nineteenth-Century British Philosophers.Ross Harrison - 2003 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 11 (4):715 – 726.
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  29. The Emergence of Psychology.Gary Hatfield - 2014 - In W. J. Mander (ed.), Oxford Handbook of British Philosophy in the Nineteenth Century. Oxford University Press. pp. 324–4.
    This chapter challenges the view that psychology emerged from philosophy about 1900, when each found its own proper sphere with little relation to the other. It begins by considering the notion of a discipline, defined as a distinct branch of learning. Psychology has been a discipline from the time of Aristotle, though with a wider ambit, to include phenomena of both life and mind. Empirical psychology in a narrower sense arose in the eighteenth century, through the application (in Britain and (...)
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  30. Psychology, Epistemology, and the Problem of the External World : Russell and Before.Gary Hatfield - 2013 - In Erich H. Reck (ed.), The Historical Turn in Analytic Philosophy. Palgrave-Macmillan.
    This chapter examines Russell’s appreciation of the relevance of psychology for the theory of knowledge, especially in connection with the problem of the external world, and the background for this appreciation in British philosophy of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Russell wrote in 1914 that “the epistemological order of deduction includes both logical and psychological considerations.” Indeed, the notion of what is “psychologically derivative” played a crucial role in his epistemological analysis from this time. His epistemological discussions engage psychological factors (...)
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  31. William Whewell: A Composite Portrait by Menachem Fisch; Simon Schaffer. [REVIEW]Gary Hatfield - 1993 - Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 84:811-811.
    Review of: Menachem Fisch; Simon Schaffer (Editors). William Whewell: A Composite Portrait. xiv + 403 pp., bibl., index. Oxford: Clarendon Press of Oxford University Press, 1991. $98.
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  32. The Singularity of Our Inhabited World: William Whewell Vs. A. R. Wallace in Dissent.William C. Heffernan - 1978 - Journal of the History of Ideas 39 (1):81.
  33. Defining Science: William Whewell, Natural Knowledge, and Public Debate in Early Victorian Britain.Thomas William Heyck - 1996 - History of European Ideas 22 (2):177-178.
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  34. Hegel at Oxford, 1986.Stephen Houlgate - 1987 - The Owl of Minerva 18 (2):225-239.
  35. Hegel at Oxford, 1985.Stephen G. Houlgate - 1986 - The Owl of Minerva 18 (1):103-109.
  36. Henry William Chandler.B. I. - 1889 - The Classical Review 3 (07):321-322.
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  37. An Historic Defence of William Paley's Teleological Argument.Mavaddat Javid - manuscript
    While it may remain difficult for the student of modernity to understand the weight of Paley’s teleological arguments for nineteenth century British scientists, the idea of a design in nature and the implication of a designer nevertheless provided lasting explanatory power amongst competing hypotheses until up to Darwin. As Richard Dawkins points out, it was reasonable for English scientists to maintain telic 'causes' in the explanation of biological origins until the observations of Paley were ascribed to a natural mechanism as (...)
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  38. How Hume Became a Sceptic (2005).McRobert Jennifer - manuscript
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  39. Confidence, Humility, and Virtue in Nineteenth Century Philosophies.Ian James Kidd - forthcoming - In Herman Paul & Jeroen van Dongen (eds.), Epistemic Virtues in the Sciences and the Humanities (Dordrecht:). Springer.
    Most historians explains changes in conceptions of the epistemic virtues and vices in terms of social and historical developments. I argue that such approaches, valuable as they are, neglect the fact that certain changes also reflect changes in metaphysical sensibilities. Certain epistemic virtues and vices are defined relative to an estimate of our epistemic situation that is, in turn, defined by a broader vision or picture of the nature of reality. I defend this claim by charting changing conceptions of the (...)
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  40. William Whewell Philosopher of Science.David Knight - 1992 - History of European Ideas 14 (3):460-461.
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  41. Philosophy at Yale in the Century After Darwin.Bruce Kuklick - 2004 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 21 (3):313 - 336.
  42. Working-Class Autobiographers in Nineteenth-Century Europe: Some Franco-British Comparisons.Martyn Lyons - 1995 - History of European Ideas 20 (1-3):235-241.
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  43. British Technology and European Industrialization: The Norwegian Textile Industry in the Mid Nineteenth Century.Christine MacLeod - 1991 - History of European Ideas 13 (3):307-309.
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  44. The Oxford Handbook of British Philosophy in the Nineteenth Century.W. J. Mander (ed.) - 2014 - Oxford University Press.
    This is the first full assessment of British philosophy in the 19th century. Specially written essays by leading experts explore the work of the key thinkers of this remarkable period in intellectual history, covering logic and scientific method, metaphysics, religion, positivism, the impact of Darwin, and ethical, social, and political theory.
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  45. British Philosophy I the Nineteenth Century.W. J. Mander (ed.) - 2014 - Oxford University Press.
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  46. La Logique Symbolique En Débat À Oxford À la Fin du XIXe Siècle : Les Disputes Logiques de Lewis Carroll Et John Cook Wilson.Mathieu Marion & Amirouche Moktefi - 2014 - Revue D’Histoire des Sciences 67 (2):185-205.
    The development of symbolic logic is often presented in terms of a cumulative story of consecutive innovations that led to what is known as modern logic. This narrative hides the difficulties that this new logic faced at first, which shaped its history. Indeed, negative reactions to the emergence of the new logic in the second half of the nineteenth century were numerous and we study here one case, namely logic at Oxford, where one finds Lewis Carroll, a mathematical teacher who (...)
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  47. ‘The Progeny Of These Two “Fellows”’: Robert Willis, William Whewell and the Sciences of Mechanism, Mechanics and Machinery in Early Victorian Britain.Ben Marsden - 2004 - British Journal for the History of Science 37 (4):401-434.
    This paper examines Robert Willis's science of ‘mechanism’, its relation to the later mechanics textbooks of William Whewell, and its promotion as the key to appreciating, understanding and contriving machinery in Victorian Britain. Responsive, first, to the Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge and later to student audiences at Cambridge, Willis constructed a science of ‘mechanism’ in both words in print and works in practice. With Whewell's sanction in the Philosophy of the Inductive Sciences , Willis's Principles of Mechanism (...)
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  48. John M. E. Mctaggart.Kris McDaniel - 2010 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    This is the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy comprehensive article on J.M.E. MacTaggart, with special focus on his methodology for philosophy, his metaphysical system, and his ethics.
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  49. William Whewell: A Composite Portrait. [REVIEW]Don Mcnally - 1992 - British Journal for the History of Science 25 (3):365-368.
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  50. Introduction.Jennifer McRobert - 2000 - In Philosophical Works of Lady Mary Shepherd, 2 Vols. Thoemmes Press. pp. 21.
    Introductory article in a collection entitled Philosophical Works of Lady Mary Shepherd. Published in 2 volumes. Thoemmes Press, 2000.
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