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  1. How Hume Became a Sceptic (2005).McRobert Jennifer - manuscript
  2. Robert Leslie Ellis, William Whewell and Kant: The Role of Rev. H.F.C. Logan.Lukas M. Verburgt - forthcoming - BSHM Bulletin: Journal of the British Society for the History of Mathematics.
    Reverend H.F.C. Logan is put forward as the formerly unidentified figure to which Robert Leslie Ellis referred in a journal entry of 1840 in which he wrote that it was due to his influence that William Whewell came to uphold particular Kantian views on time and space. The historical evidence of Ellis’s early familiarity with, and later commitment to Kant is noteworthy for at least two reasons. Firstly, it puts into doubt the accepted view of the second generation of reformers (...)
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  3. A Recent Defense of Monism Based Upon the Internal Relatedness of All Things.Dean Zimmerman - forthcoming - In Francois Clementz & Jean-Maurice Monnoyer (eds.), The Metaphysics of Relations. Ontos Verlag.
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  4. On the Epistemic Role of Our Passional Nature.Frederick D. Aquino & Logan Paul Gage - 2020 - Newman Studies Journal 17 (2):41-58.
    In this article, we argue that John Henry Newman was right to think that our passional nature can play a legitimate epistemic role. First, we unpack the standard objection to Newman’s understanding of the relationship between our passional nature and the evidential basis of faith. Second, we argue that the standard objection to Newman operates with a narrow definition of evidence. After challenging this notion, we then offer a broader and more humane understanding of evidence. Third, we survey recent scholarship (...)
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  5. A Defense of Shepherd’s Account of Cause and Effect as Synchronous.David Landy - 2020 - Journal of Modern Philosophy 2 (1):1.
    Lady Mary Shepherd holds that the relation of cause and effect consists of the combination of two objects to create a third object. She also holds that this account implies that causes are synchronous with their effects. There is a single instant in which the objects that are causes combine to create the object which is their effect. Hume argues that cause and effect cannot be synchronous because if they were then the entire chain of successive causes and effects would (...)
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  6. Levi Mortera, Emanuele, Dugald Stewart. [REVIEW]Sergio Volodia Marcello Cremaschi - 2018 - Rivista di Filosofia 189 (4).
    A review of Levi Mortera's monograph on Dugald Stewart's philosophy of mind.
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  7. Taking Love Seriously: McTaggart, Absolute Reality and Chemistry.Saunders Joe - 2018 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 26 (4):719-737.
    McTaggart takes love seriously. He rejects rival accounts that look to reduce love to pleasure, moral approbation or a fitting response to someone’s qualities. In addition, he thinks that love reveals something about the structure of the universe, and that in absolute reality, we could all love each other. In this paper, I follow McTaggart in his rejection of rival accounts of love, but distance myself from his own account of love in absolute reality. I argue that in claiming that (...)
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  8. Sir John F. W. Herschel and Charles Darwin: Nineteenth-Century Science and Its Methodology.Charles H. Pence - 2018 - Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 8 (1):108-140.
    There are a bewildering variety of claims connecting Darwin to nineteenth-century philosophy of science—including to Herschel, Whewell, Lyell, German Romanticism, Comte, and others. I argue here that Herschel’s influence on Darwin is undeniable. The form of this influence, however, is often misunderstood. Darwin was not merely taking the concept of “analogy” from Herschel, nor was he combining such an analogy with a consilience as argued for by Whewell. On the contrary, Darwin’s Origin is written in precisely the manner that one (...)
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  9. William Paley.Logan Paul Gage - 2017 - In Paul Copan, I. I. I. Tremper Longman, Christopher L. Reese & Michael G. Strauss (eds.), Dictionary of Christianity and Science: The Definitive Reference for the Intersection of Christian Faith and Contemporary Science. Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan Academic. pp. 500.
    A brief introduction to the life and work of William Paley, including a discussion of the structure of his famous design argument.
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  10. Building a Science of Animal Minds: Lloyd Morgan, Experimentation, and Morgan’s Canon.Grant Goodrich & Simon Fitzpatrick - 2017 - Journal of the History of Biology 50 (3):525-569.
    Conwy Lloyd Morgan (1852–1936) is widely regarded as the father of modern comparative psychology. Yet, Morgan initially had significant doubts about whether a genuine science of comparative psychology was even possible, only later becoming more optimistic about our ability to make reliable inferences about the mental capacities of non-human animals. There has been a fair amount of disagreement amongst scholars of Morgan’s work about the nature, timing, and causes of this shift in Morgan’s thinking. We argue that Morgan underwent two (...)
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  11. Bradley's Acount of Ideal Morality: Self-Realization and Its Equivocations.Damian Ilodigwe - 2017 - Studia Redemptorystowskie 15:81-106.
    Many commentators regard Ethical Studies as the most Hegelian of Bradley’s writings. The common perception is that the Fifth essay of that work, which articulates an ethics of “My Station and its Duties”, expresses Bradley’s position on the question of the nature of morality. Nonetheless when the dialectical structure of Ethical Studies is taken into account, the common perception is not only questionable, but it also emerges that, in interrogating the nature of morality, Bradley’s concern is beyond matters merely ethical, (...)
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  12. Confidence, Humility, and Hubris in Nineteenth Century Philosophies.Ian James Kidd - 2017 - In Herman Paul & Jeroen van Dongen (eds.), Epistemic Virtues in the Sciences and the Humanities (Dordrecht:). Springer. pp. 11-25.
    Most historians explains changes in conceptions of the epistemic virtues and vices in terms of social and historical developments. I argue that such approaches, valuable as they are, neglect the fact that certain changes also reflect changes in metaphysical sensibilities. Certain epistemic virtues and vices are defined relative to an estimate of our epistemic situation that is, in turn, defined by a broader vision or picture of the nature of reality. I defend this claim by charting changing conceptions of the (...)
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  13. Review of J. B. Schneewind, Essays on the History of Moral Philosophy. [REVIEW]Anthony Skelton - 2017 - Mind 126 (503):949-954.
    This is a critical review of J. B. Schneewind's Essays on the History of Moral Philosophy which both praises and raises worries about some of the main claims found in select articles in the volume. It engages with Schneewind's remarks on the historiography of moral philosophy.
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  14. Vom Gott Zum Schriftsteller. Thomas Carlyles Helden-Panorama.Johannes Steizinger - 2017 - In Franziska Thun-Hohenstein & Matthias Schwartz (eds.), Kulturheros Genealogien. Konstellationen. Praktiken. Berlin, Germany: Kulturverlag Kadmos. pp. 77‒97.
  15. Naomi Beck. La Gauche Évolutionniste: Spencer Et Ses Lecteurs En France Et En Italie (Besançon: Presses Universitaires de Franche-Comté, 2014). [REVIEW]Trevor Pearce - 2016 - Isis 107 (2):418-419.
    Naomi Beck’s very readable book examines the reception of Herbert Spencer’s work among Italian and French intellectuals from 1860 to 1900, focusing on the role of biology in analyses of society and politics. Although its topic is narrow, the book is relevant to historians interested in Social Darwinism, positivism, early social science, and comparative history. It also provides a case study for scholars of the reception and transformation of ideas.
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  16. Empiricism and Rationalism in Nineteenth-Century Histories of Philosophy.Alberto Vanzo - 2016 - Journal of the History of Ideas 77 (2):253-282.
    This paper traces the ancestry of a familiar historiographical narrative, according to which early modern philosophy was marked by the development of empiricism, rationalism, and their synthesis by Immanuel Kant. It is often claimed that this narrative became standard in the nineteenth century, due to the influence of Thomas Reid, Kant and his disciples, or German Hegelians and British Idealists. The paper argues that the narrative became standard only at the turn of the twentieth century. This was not due to (...)
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  17. Rational Piety and Social Reform in Glasgow.Stephen Cowley - 2015 - Eugene, OR, USA: Wipf and Stock.
    James Mylne (1757-1839) taught moral philosophy and political economy in Glasgow from 1797 to the mid-1830s. Rational Piety and Social Reform in Glasgow offers readers Mylne's biography, a summary of his lectures on moral philosophy and political economy, several interpretative essays, and a collation of his introductory lecture.
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  18. Providential Naturalism and Miracles: John Fearn's Critique of Scottish Philosophy.Giovanni B. Grandi - 2015 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 13 (1):75-94.
    According to Thomas Reid, the development of natural sciences following the model of Newton's Principia and Optics would provide further evidence for the belief in a provident God. This project was still supported by his student, Dugald Stewart, in the early nineteenth century. John Fearn , an early critic of the Scottish common sense school, thought that the rise of ‘infidelity’ in the wake of scientific progress had shown that the apologetic project of Reid and Stewart had failed. In reaction (...)
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  19. From Aristotle’s Teleology to Darwin’s Genealogy: The Stamp of Inutility, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2015 (Pdf: Contents, Introduction).Marco Solinas - 2015 - Palgrave-Macmillan.
    Starting with Aristotle and moving on to Darwin, Marco Solinas outlines the basic steps from the birth, establishment and later rebirth of the traditional view of living beings, and its overturning by evolutionary revolution. The classic framework devised by Aristotle was still dominant in the 17th Century world of Galileo, Harvey and Ray, and remained hegemonic until the time of Lamarck and Cuvier in the 19th Century. Darwin's breakthrough thus takes on the dimensions of an abandonment of the traditional finalistic (...)
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  20. Human Nature, Free Will, and the Human Sciences. [REVIEW]Francesca Bordogna - 2014 - Isis 105 (1):161-163.
    Free Will and the Human Sciences in Britain, 1870–1910, and Between Mind and Nature, both published in 2013, illustrate a claim dear to Roger Smith: namely, that history—including history of the human sciences—is central to the human sciences. Free Will charts a wide range of conceptions of the will, power, agency, activity, the self, and character, as well as causality, necessity, determinism, and materialism. Victorian physicians, physiologists, scientific and philosophical psychologists, and philosophers, as well as (though that is not the (...)
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  21. Review of William Mander's 'The Oxford Handbook of British Philosophy in the Nineteenth Century'. [REVIEW]Jeremy Dunham - 2014 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 201409.
  22. Was James Ward a Cambridge Pragmatist?Jeremy Dunham - 2014 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 22 (3):557-581.
    Although the Cambridge Professor of Mental Philosophy and Logic James Ward was once one of Britain's most highly regarded Psychologists and Philosophers, today his work is unjustly neglected. This is because his philosophy is frequently misrepresented as a reactionary anti-naturalistic idealist theism. In this article, I argue, first, that this reading is false, and that by viewing Ward through the lens of pragmatism we obtain a fresh interpretation of his work that highlights the scientific nature of his philosophy and his (...)
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  23. The Emergence of Psychology.Gary Hatfield - 2014 - In W. J. Mander (ed.), Oxford Handbook of British Philosophy in the Nineteenth Century. Oxford University Press. pp. 324–4.
    This chapter challenges the view that psychology emerged from philosophy about 1900, when each found its own proper sphere with little relation to the other. It begins by considering the notion of a discipline, defined as a distinct branch of learning. Psychology has been a discipline from the time of Aristotle, though with a wider ambit, to include phenomena of both life and mind. Empirical psychology in a narrower sense arose in the eighteenth century, through the application (in Britain and (...)
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  24. Spencer, Herbert (1820–1903).Roderick Long - 2014 - In Michael Gibbons (ed.), Encyclopedia of Political Thought.
  25. British Philosophy I the Nineteenth Century.W. J. Mander (ed.) - 2014 - Oxford University Press.
  26. The Oxford Handbook of British Philosophy in the Nineteenth Century.W. J. Mander (ed.) - 2014 - Oxford University Press.
    This is the first full assessment of British philosophy in the 19th century. Specially written essays by leading experts explore the work of the key thinkers of this remarkable period in intellectual history, covering logic and scientific method, metaphysics, religion, positivism, the impact of Darwin, and ethical, social, and political theory.
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  27. La Logique Symbolique En Débat À Oxford À la Fin du XIXe Siècle : Les Disputes Logiques de Lewis Carroll Et John Cook Wilson.Mathieu Marion & Amirouche Moktefi - 2014 - Revue D’Histoire des Sciences 67 (2):185-205.
    The development of symbolic logic is often presented in terms of a cumulative story of consecutive innovations that led to what is known as modern logic. This narrative hides the difficulties that this new logic faced at first, which shaped its history. Indeed, negative reactions to the emergence of the new logic in the second half of the nineteenth century were numerous and we study here one case, namely logic at Oxford, where one finds Lewis Carroll, a mathematical teacher who (...)
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  28. The Dialectical Biologist, Circa 1890: John Dewey and the Oxford Hegelians.Trevor Pearce - 2014 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 52 (4):747-777.
    I argue in this paper that rather than viewing John Dewey as either a historicist or a naturalist, we should see him as strange but potentially fruitful combination of both. I will demonstrate that the notion of organism-environment interaction central to Dewey’s pragmatism stems from a Hegelian approach to adaptation; his turn to biology was not necessarily a turn away from Hegel. I argue that Dewey’s account of the organism-environment relation derives from the work of Oxford Hegelians such as Edward (...)
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  29. Impossible Love and Victorian Values: J. A. Symonds and the Intellectual History of Homosexuality.Emily Rutherford - 2014 - Journal of the History of Ideas 75 (4):605-627.
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  30. On Bernard Bosanquet’s “The Reality of the General Will”.Robert Stern - 2014 - Ethics 125 (1):192-195,.
    This article is a discussion of Bernard Bosanquet's paper 'The Reality of the General Will', in which its main arguments and motivations are explained. His position is compared to Rousseau's on the general will.
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  31. Psychology, Epistemology, and the Problem of the External World : Russell and Before.Gary Hatfield - 2013 - In Erich H. Reck (ed.), The Historical Turn in Analytic Philosophy. Palgrave-Macmillan.
    This chapter examines Russell’s appreciation of the relevance of psychology for the theory of knowledge, especially in connection with the problem of the external world, and the background for this appreciation in British philosophy of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Russell wrote in 1914 that “the epistemological order of deduction includes both logical and psychological considerations.” Indeed, the notion of what is “psychologically derivative” played a crucial role in his epistemological analysis from this time. His epistemological discussions engage psychological factors (...)
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  32. Possession or Insanity?: Two Views From the Victorian Lunatic Asylum.Anthony Ossa-Richardson - 2013 - Journal of the History of Ideas 74 (4):553-575.
  33. Symposium on David Phillips's Sidgwickian Ethics: Introduction.Anthony Skelton - 2013 - Revue d'Etudes Benthamiennes 12.
    This is a brief introduction to a symposium on David Phillips's Sidgwickian Ethics.
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  34. G.F. Stout and the Psychological Origins of Analytic Philosophy.Maria van der Schaar - 2013 - Palgrave McMillan.
    This book shows that Stout's ideas have played a role in Moore and Russell's development from their early idealism towards analytic realism, where Stout's ideas often find their origin in early phenomenology.
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  35. Review of D. Wilson and W. Dixon, A History of Homo Economicus. [REVIEW]Sergio Volodia Marcello Cremaschi - 2012 - History of Economic Ideas 19 (3):224-227.
    A critical discussion of DAVID WILSON and WILLIAM DIXON, A History of Homo Economicus. The nature of the moral in economic theory, London and New York, Routledge, pp. xviii+123 ISBN 978-0-415-59568-1. I declare agreement with one basic idea in this book, that economic discourse is performative, or economic theory is not pure theorìa. I add several objections to the historical reconstruction carried out os such authors as Malthus and Ricardo and I object to the definition adopted of homo economicus.
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  36. The Spaces of Knowledge: Bertrand Russell, Logical Construction, and the Classification of the Sciences.Omar W. Nasim - 2012 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 20 (6):1163-1182.
    What Russell regarded to be the ?chief outcome? of his 1914 Lowell Lectures at Harvard can only be fully appreciated, I argue, if one embeds the outcome back into the ?classificatory problem? that many at the time were heavily engaged in. The problem focused on the place and relationships between the newly formed or recently professionalized disciplines such as psychology, Erkenntnistheorie, physics, logic and philosophy. The prime metaphor used in discussions about the classificatory problem by British philosophers was a spatial (...)
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  37. Darwin’s Pluralism, Then and Now: David N. Reznick: The Origin Then and Now: An Interpretative Guide to the Origin of Species. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2010, 448pp, $29.95 HB. [REVIEW]Rasmus Grønfeldt Winther - 2012 - Metascience 21 (1):157-161.
    Tom Stoppard’s 1966 play (and 1990 movie) /Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead/ is a metatext – as a text, it interprets, builds upon, and refers to another text, Shakespeare’s Hamlet. Similarly, David N. Reznick’s /The Origin then and now: An interpretative guide to the Origin of Species/ (Princeton UP, 2010) is also a metatext. In this review, I turn to the history of science to evaluate whether Reznick’s book shares three families of virtues with Stoppard’s play: (i) brevity and precision, (...)
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  38. British Idealism.Thom Brooks - 2011 - Oxford Bibliographies Online.
    British idealism flourished in the late 19th century and early 20th centuries. It was a movement with a lasting influence on the social and political thought of its time in particular. British idealists helped popularize the work of Immanuel Kant and G. W. F. Hegel in the Anglophone world, but they also sought to use insights from the philosophies of Kant and Hegel to help create a new idealism to address the many pressing issues of the Victorian period in Britain (...)
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  39. What Did the British Idealists Do for Us?Thom Brooks - 2011 - In New Waves in Ethics. Palgrave-Macmillan. pp. 28--47.
    Perhaps one of the most underappreciated philosophical movements is British Idealism. This movement arose during the latter half of the nineteenth century and began to wane after the outbreak of the First World War. British Idealism has produced a number of important figures, such as Bernard Bosanquet, R. G. Collingwood, F. H. Bradley and T. H. Green, as well as other important, but less well known, figures, such as J. S. Mackenzie, John Henry Muirhead and James Seth. It has also (...)
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  40. The Extension of Color Sensations: Reid, Stewart, and Fearn.Giovanni B. Grandi - 2011 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 41 (S1):50-79.
    According to Reid, color sensations are not extended nor are they arranged in figured patterns. Reid further claimed that ‘there is no sensation appropriated to visible figure.’ Reid justified these controversial claims by appeal to Cheselden's report of the experiences of a young man affected by severe cataracts, and by appeal to cases of perception of visible figure without color. While holding fast to the principle that sensations are not extended, Dugald Stewart tried to show that ‘a variety of colour (...)
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  41. ‘‘Describing Our Whole Experience’’: The Statistical Philosophies of W. F. R. Weldon and Karl Pearson.Charles H. Pence - 2011 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 42 (4):475-485.
    There are two motivations commonly ascribed to historical actors for taking up statistics: to reduce complicated data to a mean value (e.g., Quetelet), and to take account of diversity (e.g., Galton). Different motivations will, it is assumed, lead to different methodological decisions in the practice of the statistical sciences. Karl Pearson and W. F. R. Weldon are generally seen as following directly in Galton’s footsteps. I argue for two related theses in light of this standard interpretation, based on a reading (...)
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  42. Nietzsche’s Aesthetic Critique of Darwin.Charles H. Pence - 2011 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 33 (2):165-190.
    Despite his position as one of the first philosophers to write in the “post- Darwinian” world, the critique of Darwin by Friedrich Nietzsche is often ignored for a host of unsatisfactory reasons. I argue that Nietzsche’s critique of Darwin is important to the study of both Nietzsche’s and Darwin’s impact on philosophy. Further, I show that the central claims of Nietzsche’s critique have been broadly misunderstood. I then present a new reading of Nietzsche’s core criticism of Darwin. An important part (...)
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  43. The Question of Romanticism.Alistair Welchman & Judith Norman - 2011 - In Alison Stone (ed.), The Edinburgh Critical History of Philosophy: Volume 5—The Nineteenth Century. Edinburgh, UK: pp. 47-68.
    ‘Romanticism’ is one of the more hotly contested terms in the history of ideas. There is a singular lack of consensus as to its meaning, unity, and historical extension, and many attempts to fix the category of romanticism very quickly become blurry. As a result, the great historian of ideas, Arthur Lovejoy, famously concludes that: ‘the word ‘romantic’ has come to mean so many things that, by itself, it means nothing. It has ceased to perform the function of a verbal (...)
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  44. Whewell’s Tidal Researches: Scientific Practice and Philosophical Methodology.Steffen Ducheyne - 2010 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 41 (1):26-40.
    Primarily between 1833 and 1840, William Whewell attempted to accomplish what natural philosophers and scientists since at least Galileo had failed to do: to provide a systematic and broad-ranged study of the tides and to attempt to establish a general scientific theory of tidal phenomena. I document the close interaction between Whewell’s philosophy of science and his scientific practice as a tidologist. I claim that the intertwinement between Whewell’s methodology and his tidology is more fundamental than has hitherto been documented.Keywords: (...)
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  45. Prawdziwie darwinowska etyka.Andrzej Elzanowski - 2010 - Lectiones Et Acroases Philosophicae 3:13-57.
    True Darwinian Ethics -/- Darwin’s model for the evolution of morality as presented in Descent of Man (1871) is shown to comprise three major stages that are here referred to as empathic premorality, tribal morality, and universalizing morality. Empathy, the key component of Darwin’s “social instincts” that started moral evolution, is here recognized as the principal cognitive device that conveys epistemic credibility to moral agency. The two constitutive elements of the tribal morality are conscience that Darwin conceived of as a (...)
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  46. John M. E. Mctaggart.Kris McDaniel - 2010 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    This is the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy comprehensive article on J.M.E. MacTaggart, with special focus on his methodology for philosophy, his metaphysical system, and his ethics.
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  47. Laura Snyder, Reforming philosophy. [REVIEW]Sergio Volodia Marcello Cremaschi - 2009 - Rivista di Filosofia 100 (2):324-325.
    In this book the analysis of the relationship between Whewell and Mill is extended from the theme of induction, the topic the author starts with, to the comparison between the two projects of an overall reform of knowledge. These programmes announce themselves to the general public as proclamations of war for or against the academic, political and religious establishment; however, when viewed from the inside, they more or less consciously share very similar objectives. This applies both to the scientific method (...)
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  48. Whewell, Necessity and The Inductive Sciences: A Philosophical-Systematic Survey.S. Ducheyne - 2009 - South African Journal of Philosophy 28 (4):333-358.
    In this paper Whewell’s concept of necessity is scrutinized and its historical development is outlined (ca. 1833-1860). Particular attention will be paid to how Whewell interpreted the laws of the inductive sciences as being necessary since the laws of nature are concretizations of the Fundamental Ideas which can be partially described by Axioms.
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  49. Darwin's 'Angels': The Women Correspondents of Charles Darwin.Joy Harvey - 2009 - Intellectual History Review 19 (2):197-210.
  50. Bernard Bosanquet.William Sweet - 2008; 2016 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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