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Summary Epicureanism is the philosophical system formulated by Epicurus (341-271 BCE). It was one of the most influential and popular philosophical schools in the Hellenistic era. Epicureanism revives the atomism of Democritus and rejects the teleology of Aristotle and the immaterial soul and forms of Plato. All events are the result of indivisible bodies (atoms) interacting in the void, and the gods have no role in the workings of the world. Epicurean ethics is a form of ascetic egoistic hedonism. Only one's own pleasure is intrinsically valuable, but the limit of pleasure is freedom from bodily distress and (especially) peace of mind, and the way to acquire peace of mind is by limiting your desires. The Epicurean arguments against the fear of death have been especially influential: death is annihilation, and so your death is bad for you neither when you are alive (as you are not dead) nor when you are dead (as you no longer exist).
Key works Most of Epicurus' writings are lost, but book ten of Diogenes Laertius' Lives of Eminent Philosophers, in its summary of Epicurus' life and teachings, contains three letters by Epicurus that summarize his physics, views on celestial and meteorological phenomena, and ethics. It also includes the "Principal Doctrines," short sayings mainly on ethics. The Roman poet and fervent Epicurean Lucretius (c. 94-55 BCE) composed "On the Nature of Things," a massive 6-book summary of Epicurean physics. The Roman statesmen Cicero (106–43 BCE) includes important summaries of Epicurean arguments in his philosophical works. Long & Sedley 1987 and Inwood & Gerson 1994 are compendiums of many of the crucial texts, with Long & Sedley 1987 including extensive commentary.
Introductions Konstan 2008 is a good encyclopedia entry on Epicurus. O'Keefe 2010 is an accessible book-length overview of the Epicurean philosophical system, while Warren 2009 contains chapters that deal more extensively with the current scholarly literature.
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  1. Antonina M. Alberti, Jonathan Barnes, Anna Maria Ioppolo & Christopher Kirwan (1990). Logica, Mente E Persona Studi Sulla Filosofia Antica.
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  2. James Allen (1998). Études Sur les Philosophies Hellénistiques. Review of Metaphysics 52 (1):132-134.
  3. Robert J. Ball (2005). Further Observations on the Correspondence of Gilbert Highet and Cyril Bailey. Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 98 (4).
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  4. Robert J. Ball (2004). The Correspondence of Gilbert Highet and Cyril Bailey. Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 98 (1).
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  5. Rafael Ramis Barceló (2009). Hacia una lectura unitaria de la obra doxográfica de Diógenes Laercio: S. Grau Guijarro: La imatge del filòsof i de l'activitat filosòfica a la Grècia antiga, Anàlisi dels tòpics biogràfics presents a les "Vides i doctrines dels filòsofs més il·lustres" de Diògenes Laerci , Barcelona, PPU, 2009. Astrolabio: Revista Internacional de Filosofía 9:241-245.
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  6. Jonathan Barnes & France) Hellenistic Philosophy and Science Paris (1982). Science and Speculation Studies in Hellenistic Theory and Practice /Edited by Jonathan Barnes ... [Et Al.]. --. --. Cambridge University Press Editions de la Maison des Sciences de l'Homme, 1982.
  7. S. J. Bastomsky (1973). The Talmudic View of Epicureanism. Apeiron 7 (1):17 - 19.
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  8. Jean Bodin, Colloquium Heptaplomeres de Rerum Sublimium Arcanis Abditis (in Latin).
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  9. Giulia Bonasio (2016). The Pleasures of Reason in Plato, Aristotle, and the Hellenistic Hedonists by James Warren. Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 109 (4):556-557.
  10. Barbara Weiden Boyd (2015). Ovid’s Early Poetry: From His Single Heroides to His Remedia Amoris by Thea S. Thorsen. Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 109 (1):130-131.
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  11. K. R. Bradley (2015). The Material Life of Roman Slaves by Sandra R. Joshel, Lauren Hackworth Petersen. Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 108 (3):451-452.
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  12. J. Wood Brown (1895). The Corrections in the Florence Ms. Of Nonius. The Classical Review 9 (8):396-403.
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  13. Jacques Brunschwig & Martha C. Nussbaum (eds.) (1993). Passions and Perceptions: Studies in Hellenistic Philosophy of Mind. Cambridge University Press.
    The philosophers of the Hellenistic schools in ancient Greece and Rome made important contributions to the philosophy of mind and the philosophy of psychology. This volume, which contains the proceedings of the Fifth Symposium Hellenisticum, describes and analyses their contributions on issues such as: the nature of perception, imagination and belief; the nature of the passions and their role in action; the relationship between mind and body; freedom and determinism; the role of pleasure as a goal; the effects of poetry (...)
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  14. Valerio Caldesi Valeri (2015). Sources for Dragons. D. Ogden Dragons, Serpents, and Slayers in the Classical and Early Christian Worlds. A Sourcebook. Pp. XXVI + 319, Ills. New York: Oxford University Press, 2013. Paper, £18.99, Us$29.95 . Isbn: 978-0-19-992511-7. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 65 (2):333-334.
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  15. Supriya Chaudhuri (1981). The Chariot of Venus: A Note on Chapman's Mythographical Sources. Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 44:211-213.
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  16. Sara Chiarini (2015). Monumental Mythography. R.L. Fowler Early Greek Mythography. Volume 1: Text and Introduction. Pp. Xlviii + 459. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2000. Cased, £155, Us$225. Isbn: 978-0-19-814740-4. R.L. Fowler Early Greek Mythography. Volume 2: Commentary. Pp. XXII + 825. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2013. Cased, £160, Us$250. Isbn: 978-0-19-814741-1. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 65 (2):335-338.
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  17. Diskin Clay (2000). Recovering Originals: "Peri Physeos" and "De Rerum Natura". Apeiron 33 (3):259 - 271.
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  18. Diskin Clay (2000). Recovering Originals: Peri Physeos and De Rerum Natura. Apeiron 33 (3).
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  19. Diskin Clay (1990). The Philosophical Inscription of Diogenes of Oenoanda: New Discoveries 1969–1983. In Wolfgang Haase (ed.), Philosophie, Wissenschaften, Technik. Philosophie. De Gruyter. pp. 2446-2560.
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  20. Diskin Clay (1990). The Philosophical Inscription of Diogenes of Oenoanda: New Discoveries 1969–1983. In Wolfgang Haase (ed.), Philosophie, Wissenschaften, Technik. Philosophie. De Gruyter. pp. 3231-3233.
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  21. Jasmin Contos, Fear Not: An Epicurean Exercise.
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  22. John M. Cooper (2012). 5. The Epicurean and Skeptic Ways of Life. In Pursuits of Wisdom: Six Ways of Life in Ancient Philosophy From Socrates to Plotinus. Princeton University Press. pp. 226-304.
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  23. John M. Cooper & Julia Annas (1994). Hellenistic Philosophy of Mind. Philosophical Review 103 (1):182.
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  24. Óscar Cubo Ugarte (2010). Hacia Un Cuidado de Sí : Epicuro. Endoxa 1 (25):89.
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  25. A. S. D. (1919). Virgil, Aen. Vii. 695-6’ Again. The Classical Review 33 (7-8):144-145.
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  26. Alexander Dalzell (1989). Hellenistic Philosophy. [REVIEW] Ancient Philosophy 9 (1):131 - 132.
  27. Erika Zimmermann Damer (2014). Recent Work on Tibullus. Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 107 (4):443-450.
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  28. Charles Dempsey (1966). The Textual Sources of Poussin's Marine Venus in Philadelphia. Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 29:438-442.
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  29. Charles Dempsey (1965). Poussin's Marine Venus at Philadelphia: A Re-Identification Accepted. Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 28:338-343.
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  30. Valentina Denardis (2013). Manilius and His Intellectual Background by Katharina Volk. Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 107 (2):282-283.
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  31. Megan O. Drinkwater (2015). Irreconcilable Differences: Pastoral, Elegy, and Epic in Ovid’s Heroides 5. Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 108 (3):385-402.
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  32. A. M. E. (1942). Philodemus: On Methods of Inference. A Study in Ancient Empiricism. [REVIEW] Journal of Philosophy 39 (2):52-53.
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  33. ) Officina Dei Papiri Ercolanesi, Biblioteca Nazionale & Congresso Internazionale Romano (1993). "Epicuro E l'Epicureismo Nei Papiri Ercolanesi Mostra Bibliografica E Documentaria in Occasione Del Congresso Internazionale "L"Epicureismo Greco E Romano", 19-26 Maggio 1993. Nella Sede Dell'istituto.
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  34. Holger Essler (2014). Space and Movement in Philodemus’ De Dis 3: An Anti-Aristotelian Account. In Christoph Horn, Christoph Helmig & Graziano Ranocchia (eds.), Space in Hellenistic Philosophy: Critical Studies in Ancient Physics. De Gruyter. pp. 101-124.
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  35. S. F. (2000). Keimpe Algra, Jonathan Barnes, Jaap Mansfeld and Malcolm Schofield (Eds) the Cambridge History of Hellenistic Philosophy. (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1999). Pp. XIX + 916. £80·00 (Hbk). ISBN 0 521 250285. [REVIEW] Religious Studies 36 (4):505-507.
  36. Janet Fairweather (1987). Ovid's Autobiographical Poem, Tristia 4.10. Classical Quarterly 37 (01):181-.
    Ovid's Tristia4.10 has in the past chiefly been considered as a source of biographical information rather than as a poem, but increasing interest in the poetry of Ovid's exile has now at last started to promote serious efforts to appreciate its literary qualities. The poem presents a formidable challenge to the critic: at first reading it seems a singularly pedestrian account of the poet's life and, although one may adduce plenty of parallels for details in its phrasing elsewhere in the (...)
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  37. Henri Frankfort (1958). The Dying God. Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 21 (3/4):141-151.
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  38. Laurel Fulkerson (2015). Homeric Effects in Vergil’s Narrative by Alessandro Barchiesi. Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 109 (1):128-129.
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  39. David J. Furley (ed.) (1999). From Aristotle to Augustine. Routledge.
    This offering in Routledge's acclaimed History of Philosophy series completes the acclaimed 10-volume collection. This work explores the schools of thought that developed in the wake of Platonism through the time of Augustine. The 11 separately authored in-depth articles include: Aristotle the scientist-- David Furley, Princeton University; Aristotle: logic and metaphysics-- Alan Code, Ohio State University; Aristotle: aesthetics and philosophy of mind -- David Gallop, Trent University, Ontario; Aristotle: ethics and politics-- Stephen White, University of Texas at Austin; The peripatetic (...)
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  40. J. C. A. Gaskin (1998). Sharples, RW-Stoics, Epicureans and Sceptics. Philosophical Books 39:240-240.
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  41. J. C. A. Gaskin (ed.) (1995). The Epicurean Philosophers. C.E. Tuttle.
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  42. Alfred Carl F. Gercke (1899). De Quibusdam Laertii Diogenis Auctoribus.
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  43. Lloyd P. Gerson (1995). Passions and Perceptions: Studies in Hellenistic Philosophy of Mind. Journal of the History of Philosophy 33 (1):165-166.
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  44. Marcello Gigante (1992). Cinismo E Epicureismo.
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  45. Christopher Gill (2009). Stoicism and Epicureanism. In Peter Goldie (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Emotion. Oxford University Press.
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  46. Christopher Gill, Jacques Brunschwig & Martha Nussbaum (1995). Passions and Perceptions: Studies in Hellenistic Philosophy of Mind: Proceedings of the Fifth Symposium Hellenisticum. Philosophical Review 104 (4):583.
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  47. David Kenneth Glidden (1971). The Epicurean Theory of Knowledge. Dissertation, Princeton University
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  48. A. S. F. Gow (1932). Diminutives in Augustan Poetry. Classical Quarterly 26 (3-4):150-.
    In the course of his dispute with Conington on the comparative merits of Catullus and Horace, Munro taxed the Augustans with having made the lyric of the heart impossible in Latin by their virtual exclusion of diminutives from the language of poetry; and, whether that is the result or no, the general fact that diminutives are rare in the serious poetry of the Augustan age is well known. The details, however, are less easy to come by. Stolz and Stolz-Schmalz devote (...)
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  49. Laura Grams (2007). Language and Learning: Philosophy of Language in the Hellenistic Age (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 45 (1):153-154.
    Laura Grams - Language and Learning: Philosophy of Language in the Hellenistic Age - Journal of the History of Philosophy 45:1 Journal of the History of Philosophy 45.1 153-154 Muse Search Journals This Journal Contents Reviewed by Laura Grams University of Nebraska at Omaha Dorothea Frede and Brad Inwood, editors. Language and Learning: Philosophy of Language in the Hellenistic Age. Cambridge-New York: Cambridge University Press, 2005. Pp. xi + 353. Cloth, $90.00. This collection of papers on Hellenistic philosophy of language (...)
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  50. Frank Granger (1915). Some Greek and Roman Ideas of a Future Life. By Cyril Bailey. Pp. 24. Leeds and District Branch of the Classical Association. 1915. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 29 (04):125-126.
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