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  1. Intersemiotic Translation and Transformational Creativity.Daniella Aguiar, Pedro Ata & Joao Queiroz - 2015 - Punctum 1 (2):11-21.
    In this article we approach a case of intersemiotic translation as a paradigmatic example of Boden’s ‘transformational creativity’ category. To develop our argument, we consider Boden’s fundamental notion of ‘conceptual space’ as a regular pattern of semiotic action, or ‘habit’ (sensu Peirce). We exemplify with Gertrude Stein’s intersemiotic translation of Cézanne and Picasso’s proto-cubist and cubist paintings. The results of Stein’s IT transform the conceptual space of modern literature, constraining it towards new patterns of semiosis. Our association of Boden’s framework (...)
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  2. Could Perspective Ever Be a Symbolic Form? Revisiting Panofsky with Cassirer.Emmanuel Alloa - 2015 - Journal of Aesthetics and Phenomenology 2 (1):51-72.
    Erwin Panofsky’s essay “Perspective as Symbolic Form” from 1924 is among the most widely commented essays in twentieth-century aesthetics and was discussed with regard to art theory, Renaissance painting, Western codes of depiction, history of optical devices, psychology of perception, or even ophthalmology. Strangely enough, however, almost nothing has been written about the philosophical claim implicit in the title, i.e. that perspective is a symbolic form among others. The article situates the essay within the intellectual constellation at Aby Warburg’s Kulturwissenschaftliche (...)
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  3. Aesthetics and Logic: An Analogy.Karl Aschenbrenner - 1964 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 23 (1):63-79.
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  4. Art and Understanding. In Defence of Aesthetic Cognitivism.Christoph Baumberger - 2013 - In Marc Greenlee, Rainer Hammwöhner, Bernd Köber, Christoph Wagner & Christian Wolff (eds.), Bilder sehen. Perspektiven der Bildwissenschaft. Schnell + Steiner. pp. 41-67.
    Aesthetic cognitivism is best thought of as a conjunction of an epistemic and an aesthetic claim. The epistemic thesis is that artworks have cognitive functions, the aesthetic thesis that cognitive functions of artworks partly determine their artistic value. In this article, my first aim is to defend the epistemic thesis of aesthetic cognitivism. Since it seems undeniable that artworks have cognitive functions, yet less clear whether they have them as artworks, I will focus on cognitive functions that plausibly belong to (...)
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  5. Aesthetic Theory and Aesthetic Science: Prospects for Integration.Vincent Bergeron & Dominic McIver Lopes - 2012 - In Steven Palmer & Arthur Shimamura (eds.), , with Vincent Bergeron, Aesthetic Science: Connecting Minds, Brains, and Experience. Oxford University Press.
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  6. Paganini Does Not Repeat. Musical Improvisation and the Type/Token Ontology.Alessandro Bertinetto - 2012 - Teorema: International Journal of Philosophy 31 (3):105-126.
    This paper explores the ontology of musical improvisation (MI). MI, as process in which creative and performing activities are one and the same generative occurrence, is contrasted with the most widespread conceptual resource used in inquiries about music ontology of the Western tradition: the type/token duality (TtD). TtD, which is used for explaining the relationship between musical works (MWs) and performances, does not fit for MI. Nonetheless MI can be ontologically related to MWs. A MW can ensue from MI and (...)
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  7. Henri Maldiney, Art et existence. [REVIEW]Guy Bouchard - 1986 - Philosophy in Review 6:505-507.
    Cet ouvrage se propose de "dire ce qu'est la présence de l'oeuvre d'art dans ce qu'elle a d'absolument propre et qui est son être même: sa façon d'être le 'là'". Dans cette entreprise, une métaphysique de la présence, associée à une ontologie du Rien, scande l'écoute de l'oeuvre d'art. Les autres types d'approche sont disqualifiés sans procès, "la" sémiotique, par exemple, n'étant représentée que par un article encyclopédique. Le propos de l'auteur, en fait, s'inscrit dans un espace fort voisin de (...)
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  8. Chess Composition as an Art.Miro Brada - manuscript
    The article presents the chess composition as a logical art, with concrete examples. It began with Arabic mansuba, and later evolved to new-strategy designed by Italian Alberto Mari. The redefinition of mate (e.g. mate with a free field) or a theme to quasi-pseudo theme, opens the new space for combinations, and enables to connect it with other fields like computer science. The article was exhibited in Holland Park, W8 6LU, The Ice House between 18. Oct - 3. Nov. 2013.
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  9. The Aesthetic Stance - on the Conditions and Consequences of Becoming a Beholder.Maria Brincker - 2015 - In Alfonsina Scarinzi (ed.), Aesthetics and the Embodied Mind: Beyond Art Theory and the Cartesian Mind-Body Dichotomy. Springer. pp. 117-138.
    What does it mean to be an aesthetic beholder? Is it different than simply being a perceiver? Most theories of aesthetic perception focus on 1) features of the perceived object and its presentation or 2) on psychological evaluative or emotional responses and intentions of perceiver and artist. In this chapter I propose that we need to look at the process of engaged perception itself, and further that this temporal process of be- coming a beholder must be understood in its embodied, (...)
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  10. Ordering Our Attributions-of-Order: Commentary on McMahon.Cameron Buckner - 2012 - Essays in Philosophy 13 (2):423-429.
    In her target article, Jennifer McMahon argues that we understand art not by explicitly interpreting “raw percepts,” but rather by engaging with our implicit tendencies to interpret complex stimuli in terms of culturally-engrained preconceptions and narratives. These attributions of order require a shared conceptual and cultural background, and thus one might worry that in denying access to raw percepts, the view dulls art’s critical edge. Against this worry, McMahon argues that art can continue to create and innovate by inviting us (...)
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  11. Embodied Reflection.Camille Buttingsrud - 2018 - Body of Knowledge 2016 (1):1-12.
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  12. Methodological Issues in the Study of the Depiction of Cast Shadows: A Case Study in the Relationships Between Art and Cognition.Roberto Casati - 2003 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 62 (2):163–174.
    The relationships between art and cognition constitute a very wide set of largely unexplored and at times undefined or much too speculative problems. The field is narrowed down by imposing some constraints. It is proposed that the depiction of cast shadows, in its early history, could provide an ideal case study which conforms to the constraints. This paper addresses some methodological problems of the study of this case. A sample of relevant Renaissance images is discussed. A typology of depicted cast (...)
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  13. Phenomenology and Radio Drama.Clive Cazeaux - 2005 - British Journal of Aesthetics 45 (2):157-174.
    Radio drama is often considered an incomplete or ‘blind’ artform because it creates worlds through sound alone. The charge of incompleteness, I suggest, rests upon the orthodox empiricist conception of sensation as the receipt of separate modalities of sensory impression. However, alternative theories of sensation are offered by phenomenology and—of particular importance to this study—the restructuring of cognition that takes place in these theories plays a central role in phenomenology's account of artistic expression. The significance of this phenomenological link between (...)
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  14. The Emotional Experience of the Sublime.Tom Cochrane - 2012 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 42 (2):125-148.
    The literature on the venerable aesthetic category of the sublime often provides us with lists of sublime phenomena — mountains, storms, deserts, volcanoes, oceans, the starry sky, and so on. But it has long been recognized that what matters is the experience of such objects. We then find that one of the most consistent claims about this experience is that it involves an element of fear. Meanwhile, the recognition of the sublime as a category of aesthetic appreciation implies that attraction, (...)
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  15. Aesthetic Alienation and the Art of Modernity.Rory J. Conces - 1994 - Southwest Philosophy Review 10 (2):149-64.
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  16. Arte, Historia y Lenguaje: La Perspectiva Ontológica de Verdad y Método.Andrés-Francisco Contreras - 2015 - In Daniel Jerónimo Tobón Giraldo (ed.), Arte, hermenéutica y cultura: homenaje a Javier Domínguez Hernández. Facultad de Artes, Universidad de Antioquia. pp. 82-92.
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  17. SEEKING PHILOSOPHY BY WORDS 1 ART and META-ART.Ulrich De Balbian - 2017 - Oxford: Academic Publishers.
    ABSTRACT -/- One increasingly reads about different aspects of the death of philosophy. One reason or cause being its institutionalization, as just another academic discipline, while research universities demand their tenured professionals to produve endless streams of really irrelevant publications, resulting in dealing with more detailed, microscopic issues and fabricated ‘problems’. The professionalization of philosophers created other problems of this socio-cultural practice. The dying out of philosophy is not only cased by external social and cultural factors, but also by internal (...)
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  18. Medium, Subject Matter and Representation.John Dilworth - 2003 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 41 (1):45-62.
    I argue that the physical marks on a canvas resulting from an artist's intentional, stylistic and expressive acts cannot themselves be the artist's expression, but instead they serve to signify or indicate those acts. Thus there is a kind of indicative content associated with a picture that is distinct from its subject matter (or 'representational content'). I also argue that this kind of indicative content is closely associated with the specific artistic medium chosen by the artist as her expressive medium, (...)
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  19. Four Theories of Inversion in Art and Music.John Dilworth - 2002 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 40 (1):1-19.
    Issues about the nature and ontology of works of art play a central part in contemporary aesthetics. But such issues are complicated by the fact that there seem to be two fundamentally different kinds of artworks. First, a visual artwork such as a picture or drawing seems to be closely identified with a particular physical object, in that even an exact copy of it does not count as being genuinely the same work of art. Nelson Goodman describes such works as (...)
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  20. The Fictionality of Plays.John Dilworth - 2002 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 60 (3):263–273.
    The category of works of fiction is a very broad and heterogeneous one. I do have a general thesis in mind about such works, namely, that they themselves are fictional, in much the same way as are the fictional events or entities that they are about. But a defense of such a broad thesis would provide an intractably complex topic for an introductory essay, so I shall here confine myself to a presentation of a similar thesis for narrative theatrical works (...)
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  21. Fiction and Thought Experiment - A Case Study.Daniel Dohrn - 2016 - Teorema: International Journal of Philosophy 35 (3):185-199.
    Many philosophers are very sanguine about the cognitive contributions of fiction to science and philosophy. I focus on a case study: Ichikawa and Jarvis’s account of thought experiments in terms of everyday fictional stories. As far as the contribution of fiction is not sui generis, processing fiction often will be parasitic on cognitive capacities which may replace it; as far as it is sui generis, nothing guarantees that fiction is sufficiently well-behaved to abide by the constraints of scientific and philosophical (...)
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  22. Conceptual Truth and Aesthetic Truth.Kenneth Dorter - 1990 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 48 (1):37-51.
  23. Reorienting Aesthetics, Reconceiving Cognition.Catherine Z. Elgin - 2000 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 58 (3):219-225.
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  24. Consciousness, Art, and the Brain: Lessons From Marcel Proust.Russell Epstein - 2004 - Consciousness and Cognition 13 (2):213-40.
    In his novel Remembrance of Things Past, Marcel Proust argues that conventional descriptions of the phenomenology of consciousness are incomplete because they focus too much on the highly-salient sensory information that dominates each moment of awareness and ignore the network of associations that lies in the background. In this paper, I explicate Proust’s theory of conscious experience and show how it leads him directly to a theory of aesthetic perception. Proust’s division of awareness into two components roughly corresponds to William (...)
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  25. Acknowledgement and the Paradox of Tragedy.Daan Evers & Natalja Deng - 2016 - Philosophical Studies 173 (2):337-350.
    We offer a new answer to the paradox of tragedy. We explain part of the appeal of tragic art in terms of its acknowledgement of sad aspects of life and offer a tentative explanation of why acknowledgement is a source of pleasure.
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  26. Deception in Chinese Buddhist Thinking : Reflections From the Lotus Sutra and the Vimalakirti Sutra.Anna Ghiglione - 2009 - In Leslie Anne Boldt-Irons, Corrado Federici & Ernesto Virgulti (eds.), Disguise, Deception, Trompe-L'oeil: Interdisciplinary Perspectives. Peter Lang. pp. 99--285.
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  27. "You Don't See with Your Eyes, You Perceive with Your Mind": Knowledge and Perception.Mitchell S. Green - 2005 - In D. Darby & T. Shelby (eds.), Hip Hop and Philosophy. Open Court.
    A major theme in rap lyrics is that the only way to survive is to use your head, be aware, know what’s going on around you. That simple idea packs a lot of background. The most obvious ideas about knowledge turn out if you look at them close up to be pretty questionable. For example: How do we get knowledge about the world? A natural and ancient answer to this question is that much if not all of our knowledge comes (...)
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  28. Toward an Aesthetics of New-Media Environments.Eran Guter - 2016 - Proceedings of the European Society for Aesthetics.
    In this paper I suggest that, over and above the need to explore and understand the technological newness of computer art works, there is a need to address the aesthetic significance of the changes and effects that such technological newness brings about, considering the whole environmental transaction pertaining to new media, including what they can or do offer and what users do or can do with such offerings, and how this whole package is integrated into our living spaces and activities. (...)
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  29. Vulgar Pragmatism.Susan Haack - 1995 - In Herman J. Saatkamp (ed.), Rorty & Pragmatism: The Philosopher Responds to His Critics. Vanderbilt University Press. pp. 136.
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  30. Understanding Plays.James R. Hamilton - 2006 - In Saltz Krasner (ed.), Staging Philosophy.
    Hamilton argues that there is a level of understanding of theatrical performances, and narrative performances in particular (called "plays"), that does not require grasp of the large-scale aesthetic features that usually inform the structure of what is presented. This "basic understanding" is required for any spectator to go on to have a deeper understanding and, so, grounds any spectator's understanding of the larger-scale features of a performance.
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  31. Aesthetic Creativity: Insights From Classical Literary Theory on Creative Learning.Tomas Georg Hellström - 2011 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (4):321-335.
    This paper addresses the subject of textual creativity by drawing on work done in classical literary theory and criticism, specifically new criticism, structuralism and early poststructuralism. The question of how readers and writers engage creatively with the text is closely related to educational concerns, though they are often thought of as separate disciplines. Modern literary theory in many ways collapses this distinction in its concern for how literariness is achieved and, specifically, how ‘literary quality’ is accomplished in the textual and (...)
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  32. Mathematics and Aesthetics in Kantian Perspectives.Wenzel Christian Helmut - 2016 - In Peter Cassaza, Steven G. Krantz & Randi R. Ruden (eds.), I, Mathematician II. Further Introspections on the Mathematical Life. The Consortium of Mathematics and its Applications. pp. 93-106.
    This essay will inform the reader about Kant’s views on mathematics and aesthetics. It will also critically discuss these views and offer further suggestions and personal opinions from the author’s side. Kant (1724-1804) was not a mathematician, nor was he an artist. One must even admit that he had little understanding of higher mathematics and that he did not have much of a theory that could be called a “philosophy of mathematics” either. But he formulated a very influential aesthetic theory (...)
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  33. Review: Kukla, Aesthetics and Cognition in Kant's Critical Philosophy. [REVIEW]Fiona Hughes - 2009 - European Journal of Philosophy 17 (3):455-460.
  34. Kunst, Kontext und Erkenntnis.Christoph Jäger - 2005 - In Christoph Jäger & Georg Meggle (eds.), Kunst und Erkenntnis. mentis. pp. 9-39.
  35. La subjetivización de la estética y el valor cognitivo del arte según Gadamer.Pedro Karczmarczyk - 2007 - Analogía Filosófica: Revista de Filosofía, Investigación y Difusión (1):127-173.
    En este trabajo analizamos la reivindicación gadameriana del valor cognitivo de arte como un ejemplo de un modo de conocimiento que permite concebir de mejor manera la comprensión que tiene lugar en las ciencias del espíritu. Dicha reivindicación presupone el desconocimiento del valor cognitivo del arte operado por la subjetivización de la estética con Kant y una vuelta a los presupuestos de la tradición humanista. Por ello en la introducción presentamos en esquema los conceptos humanistas de tacto, gusto, sentido común (...)
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  36. Foreword: The Return of the Subject.Gavin Keeney - 2011 - In Simone Brott (ed.), Architecture for a Free Subjectivity: Deleuze and Guattari at the Horizon of the Real. Farnham: Ashgate.
  37. Music, Language, and Cognition: And Other Essays in the Aesthetics of Music.Peter Kivy - 2007 - Oxford University Press.
    I. History. Mainwaring's Handel : its relation to British aesthetics -- Herbert Spencer and a musical dispute -- II. Opera and film. Handel's operas : the form of feeling and the problem of appreciation -- Anti-semitism in Meistersinger? -- Speech, song, and the transparency of medium : on operatic metaphysics -- III. Performance. On the historically informed performance -- Ars perfecta : toward perfection in musical performance? -- IV. Interpretation. Another go at the meaning of music : Koopman, Davies, and (...)
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  38. Aesthetic Comprehension of Abstract and Emotion Concepts: Kant’s Aesthetics Renewed.Mojca Kuplen - 2018 - Itinera 15:39-56.
    In § 49 of the Critique of the Power of Judgment Kant puts forward a view that the feeling of pleasure in the experience of the beautiful can be stimulated not merely by perceptual properties, but by ideas and thoughts as well. The aim of this paper is to argue that aesthetic ideas fill in the emptiness that abstract and emotion concepts on their own would have without empirical intuitions. That is, aesthetic ideas make these concepts more accessible to us, (...)
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  39. The Inclusive Interpretation of Kant's Aesthetic Ideas.Samantha Matherne - 2013 - British Journal of Aesthetics 53 (1):21-39.
    In the Critique of the Power of Judgment, Kant offers a theory of artistic expression in which he claims that a work of art is a medium through which an artist expresses an ‘aesthetic idea’. While Kant’s theory of aesthetic ideas often receives rather restrictive interpretations, according to which aesthetic ideas can either present only moral concepts, or only moral concepts and purely rational concepts, in this article I offer an ‘inclusive interpretation’ of aesthetic ideas, according to which they can (...)
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  40. Immediate Judgment and Non-Cognitive Ideas: The Pervasive and Persistent in the Misreading of Kant’s Aesthetic Formalism.Jennifer A. McMahon - 2017 - In Matthew Altman (ed.), Palgrave Kant Handbook. New York and Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan. pp. 425-446.
    The key concept in Kant’s aesthetics is “aesthetic reflective judgment,” a critique of which is found in Part 1 of the Critique of the Power of Judgment (1790). It is a critique inasmuch as Kant unravels previous assumptions regarding aesthetic perception. For Kant, the comparative edge of a “judgment” implicates communicability, which in turn gives it a public face; yet “reflection” points to autonomy, and the “aesthetic” shifts the emphasis away from objective properties to the subjective response evoked by the (...)
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  41. The Possibility of Objectivity in Aesthetic Evaluation in the Visual Arts.Jennifer A. McMahon - 1990 - Dissertation, The University of Melbourne
    In order to establish a rational framework within which to discuss aesthetic matters, I attempt to find grounds to support the notion that objectivity in aesthetic evaluation is possible, within the visual arts. I begin by exploring the possibility that the foundations of our aesthetic response are innate, because, if this is the case, it would indicate that aesthetic considerations have a common basis within us all, rather than belonging to a purely personal and subjective realm. In Part One, in (...)
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  42. A New Problem for Aesthetics.Kevin Melchionne - 2011 - Contemporary Aesthetics 9.
    The essay introduces the problem of aesthetic unreliability, the variety of ways in which it is difficult to grasp our aesthetic experience and the consequent confusion and unreliability of what we take as our taste.
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  43. The New Sensibility of the 1960s.Harold Osborne - 1976 - British Journal of Aesthetics 16 (2):99-107.
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  44. From an Aesthetic Point of View: Philosophy, Art, and the Senses.Peter Osborne (ed.) - 2000 - Serpent's Tail.
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  45. Does the New Classicism Need Evolutionary Theory?Ray Scott Percival - 2016 - In Elizabeth Millán (ed.), After the Avant-Gardes: Reflections on the Future of the Fine Arts. Chicago: Open Court Publishers. pp. 109-126.
    In what way might the new classicism gain support from evolutionary theory? My rough answer is that evolutionary theory can help defend a return to more classical artistic standards and also explain why classical standards are not simply imposed by social conditioning or by powerful elites, but arise naturally from something more fundamental in the human constitution. Classical standards and themes are an expression of our evolutionary history. The mind can be seen as a biological organ or function, produced by (...)
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  46. Intellektuelle Intuition in Kants erster Kritik und Samkhya-Philosophie.Adrian M. S. Piper - 2007 - In Elke Falat & Thomas Thiel (eds.), into it. Hildesheim, Germany: Kunstverein Hildesheim/Kehrerverlag Heidelberg. pp. 94-104.
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  47. On Eliminating the Art Object.Robin Smith - 1970 - Dialectica 24 (4):261-6.
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  48. The End of Art: Hegel's Appropriation of Artistotle's Nous.Stephen Snyder - 2006 - Modern Schoolman 83 (4):301-316.
    This article investigates a tension that arises in Hegel’s aesthetic theory between theoretical and practical forms of reason. This tension, I argue, stems from Hegel’s appropriation of an Aristotelian framework for a historically unfolding social teleology which puts practical reason to work for the aims of theoretical reason. Recognizing that this aspect of Hegel’s dialectic is essential in overcoming problems left in Kant’s transcendental idealism, the appearance of incongruence does not lessen. Grouped together with absolute spirit, Hegel positions art as (...)
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  49. Activer les concepts. Allers-retours entre art et philosophie.Klaus Speidel - 2014 - Rue Descartes 80 (1):62.
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  50. David Davies, Art as Performance.Reviews by Robert Stecker & John Dilworth - 2005 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 63 (1):75–80.
    In his absorbing book Art as Performance, David Davies argues that artworks should be identified, not with artistic products such as paintings or novels, but instead with the artistic actions or processes that produced such items. Such a view had an earlier incarnation in Currie’s widely criticized “action type hypothesis”, but Davies argues that it is instead action tokens rather than types with which artworks should be identified. This rich and complex work repays the closest study in spite of some (...)
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