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  1. Concepts on the Move.Annette W. Balkema & Henk Slager (eds.) - 2002 - Brill | Rodopi.
    In order to give an impetus to the production of an apparatus of aesthetic concepts, in line with Deleuze and Guattari’s claim to create new concepts for a changing world, this volume publishes statements and discussions of ten Concept on the Move workshops, as well as texts and discussions of the concluding Concept on the Move symposium. The integral outcome of the workshops, the symposium and the discussions does not, however, present some sort of blueprint for the future of visual (...)
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  2. Supervenience and the Justification of Aesthetic Judgments.John Bender - 1987 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 46 (1):31-40.
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  3. Realism, Supervenience, and Irresolvable Aesthetic Disputes.John W. Bender - 1996 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 54 (4):371-381.
  4. Why Sibley is Not a Generalist After All.Anna Bergqvist - 2010 - British Journal of Aesthetics 50 (1):1-14.
    In his influential paper, ‘General Criteria and Reasons in Aesthetics’, Frank Sibley outlines what is taken to be a generalist view (shared with Beardsley) such that there are general reasons for aesthetic judgement, and his account of the behaviour of such reasons, which differs from Beardsley's. In this paper my aim is to illuminate Sibley's position by employing a distinction that has arisen in meta-ethics in response to recent work by Jonathan Dancy in particular. Contemporary research involves two related yet (...)
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  5. "Frank Kupka": Jean Cassou and Denise Fedit. [REVIEW]Ralph Berry - 1965 - British Journal of Aesthetics 5 (4):412.
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  6. Thick Aesthetic Concepts.Roman Bonzon - 2009 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 67 (2):191-199.
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  7. Introduction : Sibley's Vision.Emily Brady - unknown
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  8. Aesthetic Concepts : Essays After Sibley.Emily Brady & J. Levinson - unknown
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  9. Aesthetic Concepts: Essays After Sibley.Emily Brady & Jerrold Levinson (eds.) - 2001 - Oxford University Press.
    Exploring key topics in contemporary aesthetics, this work analyzes the issues that arise from the unique works of Frank Sibley (1923-1996), who developed a distinctive aesthetic theory through a number of papers published between 1955 and 1995. Here, thirteen philosophical aestheticians bring Sibley's insight into a contemporary framework, exploring the ways his ideas foster important new discussion about issues in aesthetics. This collection will interest anyone interested in philosophy, art theory, and art criticism.
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  10. Frank Sibley's "Aesthetic Concepts".R. David Broiles - 1964 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 23 (2):219-225.
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  11. The Characterization of Aesthetic Qualities by Essential Metaphors and Quasi-Metaphors.Malcolm Budd - 2006 - British Journal of Aesthetics 46 (2):133-143.
    My paper examines a vital but neglected aspect of Frank Sibley's pioneering account of aesthetic concepts. This is the claim that many aesthetic qualities are such that they can be characterized adequately only by metaphors or ‘quasi-metaphors’. Although there is no indication that Sibley embraced it, I outline a radical, minimalist conception of the experience of perceiving an item as possessing an aesthetic quality, which, I believe, has wide application and which would secure Sibley's position for those aesthetic qualities that (...)
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  12. Review: Sibley's Aesthetics. [REVIEW]Malcolm Budd - 2002 - Philosophical Quarterly 52 (207):237 - 246.
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  13. Sibley's Aesthetics. [REVIEW]Malcolm Budd - 2002 - Philosophical Quarterly 52 (207):237–246.
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  14. Reasoned and Unreasoned Judgement: On Inference, Acquaintance and Aesthetic Normativity.Dan Cavedon-Taylor - 2017 - British Journal of Aesthetics 57 (1):1-17.
    Aesthetic non-inferentialism is the widely-held thesis that aesthetic judgements either are identical to, or are made on the basis of, sensory states like perceptual experience and emotion. It is sometimes objected to on the basis that testimony is a legitimate source of such judgements. Less often is the view challenged on the grounds that one’s inferences can be a source of aesthetic judgements. This paper aims to do precisely that. According to the theory defended here, aesthetic judgements may be unreasoned, (...)
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  15. Aesthetic/Non-Aesthetic and the Concept of Taste: A Critique of Sibley's Position.Ted Cohen - 1973 - Theoria 39 (1-3):113-152.
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  16. Sibley's Legacy.Brandon Cooke - 2005 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 39 (1):105-118.
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  17. Aesthetic Concepts, Perceptual Learning, and Linguistic Enculturation: Considerations From Wittgenstein, Language, and Music.Adam M. Croom - 2012 - Integrative Psychological and Behavioral Science 46:90-117.
    Aesthetic non-cognitivists deny that aesthetic statements express genuinely aesthetic beliefs and instead hold that they work primarily to express something non-cognitive, such as attitudes of approval or disapproval, or desire. Non-cognitivists deny that aesthetic statements express aesthetic beliefs because they deny that there are aesthetic features in the world for aesthetic beliefs to represent. Their assumption, shared by scientists and theorists of mind alike, was that language-users possess cognitive mechanisms with which to objectively grasp abstract rules fixed independently of human (...)
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  18. Supervenience, Essentialism and Aesthetic Properties.Gregory Currie - 1990 - Philosophical Studies 58 (3):243 - 257.
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  19. Indiscernibility and Perception: A Reply to Joseph Margolis.Arthur C. Danto - 1999 - British Journal of Aesthetics 39 (4):321-329.
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  20. The Concept of an Aesthetic Property.De Clercq Rafael - 2002 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 60 (2):167–176.
    This paper provides an analysis of the concept of an aesthetic property in non-aesthetic terms.
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  21. The Structure of Aesthetic Properties.Rafael De Clercq - 2008 - Philosophy Compass 3 (5):894-909.
    Aesthetic properties are often thought to have either no evaluative component or an evaluative component that can be isolated from their descriptive component. The present article argues that this popular view is without adequate support. First, doubt is cast on the idea that some paradigmatic aesthetic properties are purely descriptive. Second, the idea that the evaluative component of an aesthetic property can always be neatly separated from its descriptive component is called into question. Meanwhile, a speculative hypothesis is launched regarding (...)
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  22. Aesthetic Terms, Metaphor, and the Nature of Aesthetic Properties.Rafael de Clercq - 2005 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 63 (1):27–32.
    The paper argues that an important class of aesthetic terms cannot be used as metaphors because it is impossible to commit a category mistake with them. It then uses this fact to provide a general definition of 'aesthetic property'.
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  23. A Cognitive Approach to the Earliest Art.Johan de Smedt & Helen de Cruz - 2011 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 69 (4):379-389.
    This paper takes a cognitive perspective to assess the significance of some Late Palaeolithic artefacts (sculptures and engraved objects) for philosophicalconcepts of art. We examine cognitive capacities that are necessary to produceand recognize objects that are denoted as art. These include the ability toattribute and infer design (design stance), the ability to distinguish between themateriality of an object and its meaning (symbol-mindedness), and an aesthetic sensitivity to some perceptual stimuli. We investigate to what extent thesecognitive processes played a role in (...)
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  24. Reading Sibley.George Dickie - 2004 - British Journal of Aesthetics 44 (4):408-412.
    Haydar claim that Frank Sibley offers a criterion for distinguishing aesthetically valenced from non-aesthetically valenced properties. I argue that they have misunderstood what Sibley was doing and that he never even intended to offer any such criterion. They also argue that Sibley was wrong to claim that inherently aesthetic merits are reversible. They claim that aesthetic merits—for example, elegance—are irreversible and offer some arguments for their view. I produce a counterexample to their claim about elegance and suggest that such counterexamples (...)
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  25. Beardsley, Sibley, and Critical Principles.George Dickie - 1987 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 46 (2):229-237.
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  26. Addison and the Concept of ‘Novelty’ as a Basic Aesthetic Category.Robin Dix - 1986 - British Journal of Aesthetics 26 (4):383-390.
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  27. Merit, Aesthetic and Ethical.Eaton Marcia Muelder - 2001 - Oxford University Press.
    To "look good" and to "be good" have traditionally been considered two very different notions. Indeed, philosophers have seen aesthetic and ethical values as fundamentally separate. Now, at the crossroads of a new wave of aesthetic theory, Marcia Muelder Eaton introduces this groundbreaking work, in which a bold new concept of merit where being good and looking good are integrated into one.
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  28. Intention, Supervenience, and Aesthetic Realism.Marcia Muelder Eaton - 1998 - British Journal of Aesthetics 38 (3):279-293.
  29. The Intrinsic, Non-Supervenient Nature of Aesthetic Properties.Marcia Muelder Eaton - 1994 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 52 (4):383-397.
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  30. The Sublime and the Beautiful on Ontology and Creative Imagination.Fons Elders - 2001 - Vub University Press.
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  31. Art as Cognitive: Beyond Scientific Realism.Laurence Foss - 1971 - Philosophy of Science 38 (2):234-250.
    Thesis: Art like science radically affects our perceiving and thinking, and the two are substantially alike in that together--along with an inherited "natural" language system with which they overlap--they enable us to articulate the world. Science has been advanced as the measure of all things: scientific realism. By implication, art pertains to beauty, science truth. Science effects conceptual break-throughs, changes our models of natural order. On the contrary (I argue), as a nonverbal symbol system art similarly affects paradigm-induced expectations. Substantively (...)
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  32. The Myth of the Aesthetic Predicate.Marcia P. Freedman - 1968 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 27 (1):49-55.
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  33. Objectivity and Aesthetic Judgment in the Philosophy of Frank Sibley.Ken Walter Gatzke - 1974 - Dissertation, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
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  34. The Aesthetic Relation.Gérard Genette - 1999 - Cornell University Press.
    The Aesthetic Relation is a companion volume to The Work of Art: Immanence and Transcendence, published by Cornell in 1997.
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  35. The Critical Imagination.James Grant - 2013 - Oxford University Press.
    The Critical Imagination is a study of metaphor, imaginativeness, and criticism of the arts. Since the eighteenth century, many philosophers have argued that appreciating art is rewarding because it involves responding imaginatively to a work. Literary works can be interpreted in many ways; architecture can be seen as stately, meditative, or forbidding; and sensitive descriptions of art are often colourful metaphors: music can 'shimmer', prose can be 'perfumed', and a painter's colouring can be 'effervescent'. Engaging with art, like creating it, (...)
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  36. Metaphor and Criticism BSA Prize Essay, 2010.James Grant - 2011 - British Journal of Aesthetics 51 (3):237-257.
    The prevalence of colourful metaphors and figurative language in critics’ descriptions of artworks has long attracted attention. Talk of ‘liquid melodies’, ‘purple prose’, ‘soaring arches’, and the use of still more elaborate figurative descriptions, is not uncommon. My aim in this paper is to explain why metaphor is so prevalent in critical description. Many have taken the prevalence of art-critical metaphors to reveal something important about aesthetic experience and aesthetic properties. My focus is different. I attempt to determine what metaphor (...)
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  37. Play as an Aesthetic Concept.Hilde Hein - 1968 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 27 (1):67-71.
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  38. Brady, Emily, and Jerrold Levinson, Eds. Aesthetic Concepts: Essays After Sibley.Ronald Hepburn - 2003 - Review of Metaphysics 56 (3):635-637.
  39. Sibley, F. N. -"Perception: A Philosophical Symposium". [REVIEW]J. M. Hinton - 1973 - Philosophy 48:91.
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  40. Making Sense of Affective Property.Li-Hsiang Hsu - manuscript
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  41. What Else Makes Aesthetic Terms Aesthetic?William H. Hyde - 1978 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 39 (1):124-130.
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  42. The Cosmological Aesthetic Worldview in Van Gogh’s Late Landscape Paintings.Erman Kaplama - 2016 - Cosmos and History: The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 12 (1):218-237.
    Some artworks are called sublime because of their capacity to move human imagination in a different way than the experience of beauty. The following discussion explores how Van Gogh’s The Starry Night along with some of his other late landscape paintings accomplish this peculiar movement of imagination thus qualifying as sublime artworks. These artworks constitute examples of the higher aesthetic principles and must be judged according to the cosmological-aesthetic criteria for they manage to generate a transition between ethos and phusis (...)
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  43. Introduction to Cosmological Aesthetics: The Kantian Sublime and Nietzschean Dionysian.Erman Kaplama - 2010 - International Journal of the Humanities 8 (2):69-84.
    This paper is founded on a close reading of Kant’s Opus Postumum in order both to explore the essential motivation that drove Kant to write a last comprehensive magnum opus and, by doing so, to show the essential link between his aesthetics and the idea of Übergang, the title of this last work. For this work contains not only his dynamical theory of matter defining motion as preliminary to the notions of space and time, and the advanced version of his (...)
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  44. Secondary Senses and Aesthetic Concepts: A Reply to Professor Tilghman.Peter Kivy - 1981 - Philosophical Investigations 4 (1):35-38.
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  45. Aesthetic Concepts: Some Fresh Considerations.Peter Kivy - 1979 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 37 (4):423-432.
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  46. What Makes "Aesthetic" Terms Aesthetic?Peter Kivy - 1975 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 36 (2):197-211.
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  47. Aesthetic Aspects and Aesthetic Qualities.Peter Kivy - 1968 - Journal of Philosophy 65 (4):85-93.
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  48. Is Music a Pure Icon?Felicia Kruse - 2007 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 43 (4):626 - 635.
    : In his landmark book, Peirce's Theory of Signs, T. L. Short argues that music signifies as a pure icon. A pure icon, according to Peirce, is not a likeness. It "does not draw any distinction between itself and its object" (EP2:163), and it "serves as a sign solely and simply by exhibiting the quality it serves to signify" (EP2:306). In music, this quality consists of the specifically musical feelings or ideas contained in the piece in question, and such musical (...)
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  49. Aesthetic Representation of Purposiveness and the Concept of Beauty in Kant’s Aesthetics. The Solution of the ‘Everything is Beautiful’ Problem.Mojca Küplen - 2016 - Philosophical Inquiries 4 (2):69-88.
    In the Critique of the Power of Judgment, Kant introduces the notion of the reflective judgment and the a priori principle of purposiveness or systematicity of nature. He claims that the ability to judge objects by means of this principle underlies empirical concept acquisition and it is therefore necessary for cognition in general. In addition, he suggests that there is a connection between this principle and judgments of taste. Kant’s account of this connection has been criticized by several commentators for (...)
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  50. Cognitive Function of Beauty and Ugliness in Light of Kant’s Theory of Aesthetic Ideas.Mojca Küplen - 2015 - In Andras Benedek and Kristof Nyiri (ed.), Beyond Words: Pictures, Parables, Paradoxes (Series Visual Leaning, vol. 5). Peter Lang Publisher. pp. 209-216.
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