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  1. Response to June Boyce-Tillman, "Towards an Ecology of Music Education&Quot.Elizabeth Anne Bauer - 2004 - Philosophy of Music Education Review 12 (2):186-188.
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  2. Towards an Ecology of Music Education.June Boyce-Tillman - 2004 - Philosophy of Music Education Review 12 (2):102-125.
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  3. In the Space Between the Rock and the Hard Place: State Teacher Certification Guidelines and Music Education for Social Justice.Deborah Bradley - 2011 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 45 (4):79-96.
    Différend: A case of conflict between (at least) two parties, that cannot be equitably resolved for lack of a rule of judgment applicable to both arguments. . . . A wrong results from the fact that the rules of the genre of discourse by which one judges are not those of the judged genre or genres of discourse. This paper looks at the State of Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction (DPI) Guidelines for Music Teacher Education, a governmentally defined technology of (...)
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  4. Building Public Confidence in Arts Education.Howard Cannatella - 2016 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 50 (2):26-44.
    There is a really big, complicated educational question that sometimes we hear and that always needs addressing, rebuffing, monitoring, and advancing but this is never going to be the last word on the matter because many things can transform it: the claim that no student should graduate from his or her high school without an understanding of what art is.Lots of people express this sentiment but in different ways. The statement could not be any clearer in its purpose. It is (...)
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  5. Learning to See: Art, Beauty, and the Joy of Creation in Education.Angelo Caranfa - 2016 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 50 (2):84-103.
    Education takes for granted that sight is there but that it isn’t turned the right way.A work of art... provokes in us... an image, which in our souls awakes surprise—sometimes, meditation—often, and always, the joy of creation.To place oneself in the path of beauty is the basic impulse underlying education.In The Aims of Education, Alfred North Whitehead claims that the goal of education is to cultivate an “aesthetic sense of realized perfection”1—namely, to instruct us in the way of the beautiful. (...)
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  6. Cultivating a Cosmopolitan Consciousness: Returning to the Moral Grounds of Aesthetic Education.Suzanne S. Choo - 2014 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 48 (4):94-110.
    Now I maintain that the beautiful is the symbol of the morally good. What sort of face does radical evil have? What strikes Hannah Arendt, as she sought to profile Adolf Otto Eichmann, is how completely ordinary he appeared in court. She describes him as medium-sized, middle-aged with receding hair, ill-fitting teeth, and nearsighted eyes. Yet this was the man who had meticulously organized the mass deportation of Jews to the extermination camps during the Holocaust. Like his appearance, his personality (...)
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  7. Narrative and Character Formation.Tom Cochrane - 2014 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 72 (3):303-315.
    I defend the claim that fictional narratives provide cognitive benefits to readers in virtue of helping them to understand character. Fictions allow readers to rehearse the skill of selecting and organizing into narratives those episodes of a life that reflect traits or values. Two further benefits follow: first, fictional narratives provide character models that we can apply to real-life individuals (including ourselves), and second, fictional narratives help readers to reflect on the value priorities that constitute character. I defend the plausibility (...)
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  8. Thoughts on Film: Critically Engaging with Both Adorno and Benjamin.Laura D'Olimpio - 2014 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 48 (6):622-637.
    There is a traditional debate in analytic aesthetics that surrounds the classification of film as Art. While much philosophy devoted to considering film has now moved beyond this debate and accepts film as a mass art, a sub-category of Art proper, it is worth re-considering the criticism of film pre-Deleuze. Much of the criticism of film as pseudo-art is expressed in moral terms. T. W. Adorno, for example, critiques film as ‘mass-cult’; mass produced culture which presents a ‘flattened’ version of (...)
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  9. The Beauty of the Psyche and Eros Myth: Integrating Aesthetics Into Introduction to Psychology.Diessner Rhett & Burke Kayla - 2011 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 45 (4):97-108.
    Beginning in the late 1990s we became convinced that our undergraduate psychology students needed classroom experiences that set the conditions for them to become more engaged with beauty. We recognized the intrinsic importance of beauty to human psychological development, beyond any utilitarian concerns.1 But we also believed that there were important psychological benefits to be gained by becoming increasingly engaged with beauty. In this paper we briefly describe some of those benefits that have been documented in the psychological research literature (...)
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  10. Die Idee des Konservatoriums.Andreas Dorschel - 2010 - In Laurenz Lütteken (ed.), Mendelssohns Welten. Bärenreiter. pp. 89-108.
  11. Response to June Boyce-Tillman, "Towards an Ecology of Music Education&Quot.Mark Garberich - 2004 - Philosophy of Music Education Review 12 (2):188-193.
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  12. Oral Tradition.Dustin Garlitz - 2014 - In William Forde Thompson (ed.), Music in the Social and Behavioral Sciences: An Encyclopedia. Sage Publications.
  13. Response to June Boyce-Tillman, "Towards an Ecology of Music Education&Quot.Claudia Gluschankof - 2004 - Philosophy of Music Education Review 12 (2):181-186.
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  14. How to Be a Pessimist About Aesthetic Testimony.Robert Hopkins - 2011 - Journal of Philosophy 108 (3):138-157.
    Is testimony a legitimate source of aesthetic belief? Can I, for instance, learn that a film is excellent on your say-so? Optimists say yes, pessimists no. But pessimism comes in two forms. One claims that testimony is not a legitimate source of aesthetic belief because it cannot yield aesthetic knowledge. The other accepts that testimony can be a source of aesthetic knowledge, yet insists that some further norm prohibits us from exploiting that resource. I argue that this second form of (...)
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  15. Critical Reasoning and Critical Perception.Robert Hopkins - 2006 - In Matthew Kieran & Dominic Lopes (eds.), Knowing Art. Springer. pp. 137-153.
    The outcome of criticism is a perception. Does this mean that criticism cannot count as a rational process? For it to do so, it seems it would have to be possible for there to be an argument for a perception. Yet perceptions do not seem to be the right sort of item to serve as the conclusions of arguments. Is this appearance borne out? I examine why perceptions might not be able to play that role, and explore what would have (...)
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  16. Visual Art and Education in an Era of Designer Capitalism: Deconstructing the Oral Eye.Jan Jagodzinski - 2010 - Palgrave-Macmillan.
    The oral eye is a metaphor for the dominance of global designer capitalism. It refers to the consumerism of a designer aesthetic by the ‘I’ of the neoliberalist subject, as well as the aural soundscapes that accompany the hegemony of the capturing attention through screen cultures. An attempt is made to articulate the historical emergence of such a synoptic machinic regime drawing on Badiou, Bellmer, Deleuze, Guattari, Lacan, Rancière, Virilio, Ziarek, and Žižek to explore contemporary art (post-Situationism) and visual cultural (...)
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  17. Art Museum Education: Facilitating Gallery Experiences. By Olga Hubard.Ceri Jones - 2017 - British Journal of Educational Studies 65 (1):126-128.
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  18. The Pedagogical Function of Art as Interpretation.Tyson E. Lewis - 2016 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 50 (2):57-71.
    Today, art and education have precarious statuses. Arts programs are being cut from the curriculum at an alarming rate. While the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 acknowledged the arts as a core academic subject, the arts were quickly eclipsed by the push toward quantifiable improvements on standardized tests. How should art educators respond to this urgent situation? While some might retreat back to an art-for-art’s-sake perspective, others find new justifications for the arts through the discourses of high-stakes testing (...)
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  19. American Gods is All Lies!Greg Littmann - 2012 - In Tracy Lyn Bealer, Rachel Luria & Wayne Yuen (eds.), Neil Gaiman and Philosophy: Gods Gone Wild! Open Court.
  20. Play, Skill, and the Origins of Perceptual Art.Mohan Matthen - 2015 - British Journal of Aesthetics 55 (2):173-197.
    Art is universal across cultures. Yet, it is biologically expensive because of the energy expended and reduced vigilance. Why do humans make and contemplate it? This paper advances a thesis about the psychological origins of perceptual art. First, it delineates the aspects of art that need explaining: not just why it is attractive, but why fine execution and form—which have to do with how the attraction is achieved—matter over and above attractiveness. Second, it states certain constraints: we need to explain (...)
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  21. Prolegomena to Any Future "Great Books of Music": Reconsidering Liberal-Arts Paradigms in a Postmodern Age.Kevin N. Moll - 2016 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 50 (4):45-85.
    The most fundamental issue in pedagogy is the question of what should be taught. The need to specify the content of learning applies at every stage of instruction from kindergarten to postgraduate school and at every level of curriculum from the institutional course catalogue to the daily class or lesson plan. On the broadest scale, implementation of one or another set of priorities on this matter will tend to dictate the direction of our entire educational system. Indeed, for well over (...)
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  22. The Existential Significance of Cinema in Educational Administration.Seamus Mulryan & Stephanie Mackler - 2015 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 49 (2):1-19.
    This article considers the ramifications of the persistently negative representations of educational administrators in popular film and television. It begins with the argument that Hollywood’s pejorative portrayals of principals not only reflect something about what it already means to be an educational administrator, but they also serve a pedagogical role in creating educational administrators. While some scholarship in film studies and cultural studies aptly describe representations of educational administrators, much of this work relies on implicit philosophical assumptions that this article (...)
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  23. A Praxis of Gayatri Spivak’s “Aesthetic Education” Using Arundhati Roy’s “The God of Small Things” as a Reading in Philippine Schools.Seneca Nuñeza Pellano - 2016 - Nordic Journal of Aesthetics 25 (51).
    Presented as a “speculative manual on pedagogy,” this article seeks to provide praxis to Spivak’s Aesthetic Education in the Era of Globalization using Arundhati Roy’s The God of Small Things as a reading in Philippine schools. Its aim is to envision pedagogical ways in which a foreign literary text is introduced into a culturally distant setting, thereby prompting educators – the “supposed trainers of the mind” – to resolve: How does one educate aesthetically? How do we imagine the performance of (...)
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  24. Government Support for Unconventional Works of Art.Adrian M. S. Piper - 1992 - In Andrew Buchwalter (ed.), Culture and Democracy: Social and Ethical Issues in Public Support for the Arts and Humanities. Boulder: Westview Press. pp. 217-222.
    My aim in this discussion is to argue, not only that government should provide funding for the arts, but a fortiori that it should provide funding for unconventional, disruptive works of art.
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  25. Hume's Standard of Taste and the de Gustibus Sceptic.Brian Ribeiro - 2007 - British Journal of Aesthetics 47 (1):16-28.
    In 'Of the Standard of Taste' Hume aspires to silence the 'extravagant' cavils of the anything-goes de gustibus sceptic by developing a programme of aesthetic education that would lead all properly-trained individuals to a set of agreed-upon aesthetic judgements. But I argue that if we read Hume's essay as an attempted direct theoretical refutation of de gustibus scepticism, Hume fails to achieve his aim. Moreover, although some recent commentators have read the essay as aiming at a less ambitious ‘sceptical solution’ (...)
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  26. Aesthetic Value, Artistic Value, and Morality.Andrea Sauchelli - 2016 - In David Coady, Kimberley Brownlee & Kasper Lipper-Rasmussen (eds.), Blackwell Companion to Applied Philosophy. Blackwell. pp. 514-526.
    This entry surveys issues at the intersection of art and morality. Particular emphasis is placed on whether, and in what way, the moral character of a work of art influences its artistic value. Other topics include the educational function of art and artistic censorship.
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  27. The Uses of Poetry: Renewing an Educational Understanding of a Language Art.Karen Simecek & Viv Ellis - 2017 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 51 (1):98-114.
    Poetry holds an important place as part of our cultural heritage.1 However, despite poetry’s apparent cultural value, there have been surprisingly few attempts to articulate clearly how this should be reflected in the teaching curriculum in our schools and universities. As a consequence of this lack of clarity, the cultural value of poetry gives way to the increasing emphasis on providing instrumental justification for the teaching curriculum; including poetry in the curriculum is often justified in terms of promoting transferable skills (...)
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  28. Research & Design: Textile Tectonics.Lars Spuybroek (ed.) - 2011 - NAI Publishers.
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  29. Plato.Robert Stecker - 2012 - In Alessandro Giovannelli (ed.), Aesthetics: The Key Thinkers. pp. 8-20.
  30. The Indirection of Influence: Poetics and Pedagogy in Aristotle and Plato.James Stillwaggon - 2016 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 50 (2):8-25.
    Transmitting knowledge or skills from one person or group to another has traditionally been understood as a merely proximate goal of education, the ultimate end being the lives students spend in pursuit of those learned ideals that keep our societies’ traditions alive. It is only by the life lived by the educated person or the collective life shared by an educated society that any account of educational success could properly be taken.1 Beliefs, attitudes, and habits appropriate to the society for (...)
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  31. Towards an Ecology of Music Education.June Tillman - 2004 - Philosophy of Music Education Review 12 (2):102-125.
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  32. Understanding Propaganda: The Epistemic Merit Model and Its Application to Art.Sheryl Tuttle Ross - 2002 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 36 (1):16-30.
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  33. Ontology and the Products of Spirit: A Classroom Conversation.Frederic Will - 2011 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 45 (4):67-78.
    Among the casualties of the rush to relativism is a central tenet of classical thought: that great works of literature are great in and of themselves and not because of the needs and values of their time. This “canon-based view,” supply taken for granted by Johnson, Arnold, Pope, and Eliot, has long since been shown the door by views ranging from Marxism to today’s cultural studies. These views hold that the great works become great because of the values and concerns (...)
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