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  1. Making Sense of Affective Property.Li-Hsiang Hsu - manuscript
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  2. Dewey's Aesthetics.Tom Leddy - unknown - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  3. Whatever It Turns Out To Be: Oakeshott on Aesthetic Experience.Corey Abel - forthcoming - In Leslie MArsh Paul Franco (ed.), Whatever It Turns Out To Be: Oakeshott on Aesthetic Experience. Penn State UP.
    This essay presents a multifold argument on Oakeshott's aesthetics. First, his famous essay "The Voice of Poetry" deals more explicitly and thoroughly with art than is often acknowledged. Second, aesthetic experience is a competitor to philosophic insight in so far as it discloses the coherence of a world of ideas through its uniting form and content; yet "art" remains a mode. Third, the essay points out that the absence of history from any major role in Oakeshott's most important treatment of (...)
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  4. Why the Sublime Is Aesthetic Awe.Robert R. Clewis - forthcoming - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism.
    This article focuses on the conceptual relationship between awe and the experience of the sublime. I argue that the experience of the sublime is best conceived as a species of awe, namely, as aesthetic awe. I support this conclusion by considering the prominent conceptual relations between awe and the experience of the sublime, showing that all of the options except the proposed one suffer from serious shortcomings. In maintaining that the experience of the sublime is best conceived as aesthetic awe, (...)
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  5. Aesthetic Animism.Ryan P. Doran - forthcoming - Philosophical Studies.
    I argue that the main existing accounts of the relationship between the beauty of environmental entities and their moral standing are mistaken in important ways. Beauty does not, as has been suggested by optimists, confer intrinsic moral standing. Nor is it the case, as has been suggested by pessimists, that beauty at best provides an anthropocentric source of moral standing that is commensurate with other sources of pleasure. I present arguments and evidence that show that the appreciation of beauty tends (...)
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  6. A Puzzle About Aftertaste.Akiko Frischhut & Giuliano Torrengo - forthcoming - In Andrea Borghini & Patrik Engisch (eds.), Philosophy of Recipes. Making, Experiencing, Valuing.
    When we cook, by meticulously following a recipe, or adding a personal twist to it, we sometimes care not only to (re-)produce a taste that we can enjoy, but also to give our food a certain aftertaste. This is not surprising, given that we ordinarily take aftertaste to be an important part of the gustatory experience as a whole, one which we seek out, and through which we evaluate what we eat and drink—at least in many cases. What is surprising (...)
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  7. The Expressive Import of Degradation and Decay in Contemporary Art.Sherri Irvin - forthcoming - In Peter N. Miller & Soon Kai Poh (eds.), Conserving Active Matter. Bard Graduate Center. pp. 65-79.
    Many contemporary artworks include active matter along with rules for conservation that are designed to either facilitate or prevent that matter’s degradation or decay. I discuss the mechanisms through which actual or potential states of material decay contribute to the work’s expressive import. Nelson Goodman and Catherine Elgin introduce the concepts of literal and metaphorical exemplification, which are critical to expression: a work literally exemplifies a property when it both possesses and highlights that property, and it metaphorically exemplifies a property (...)
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  8. A Fitting-Attitude Approach to Aesthetic Value?Uriah Kriegel - forthcoming - British Journal of Aesthetics.
    It is a noteworthy disanalogy between contemporary ethics and aesthetics that the fitting-attitude account of value, so prominent in contemporary ethics, sees comparatively little play in aesthetics. The aim of this paper is to articulate what a systematic fitting-attitude-style framework for understanding aesthetic value might look like. In the bulk of the paper, I sketch possible fitting-attitude-style accounts of three central aesthetic values – the beautiful, the sublime, and the powerful – so that the general form of the framework come (...)
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  9. Theory Evaluation and Formulation: A Reply to Ludic Theory Through A.N.Whitehead´s Aesthetic Experience.Camilo Osejo-Bucheli - forthcoming - Philosophy of Management.
  10. Whatever It Turns Out To Be: Oakeshott on Aesthetic Experience.Leslie MArsh Paul Franco (ed.) - forthcoming - Penn State UP.
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  11. Democratic Freedom as an Aesthetic Achievement: Peirce, Schiller and Cavell on Aesthetic Experience, Play and Democratic Freedom.Michael Räber - forthcoming - Philosophy and Social Criticism.
    Philosophy & Social Criticism, Ahead of Print. In this essay, I reconsider the constitution of democratic freedom in aesthetic terms. My interest is in articulating a conception of aesthetic freedom that can be mapped onto a conception of democratic freedom. For this purpose, I bring together Charles Sanders Peirce’s ontology, which comprises fragments of an aesthetic theory, Friedrich Schiller’s concept of aesthetic play and Stanley Cavell’s democratic perfectionism. By providing a philosophical framework for constructing an aesthetics and politics that supports (...)
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  12. Democratic Freedom as an Aesthetic Achievement: Peirce, Schiller and Cavell on Aesthetic Experience, Play and Democratic Freedom.Michael Räber - forthcoming - Philosophy and Social Criticism:019145372110668.
    Philosophy & Social Criticism, Ahead of Print. In this essay, I reconsider the constitution of democratic freedom in aesthetic terms. My interest is in articulating a conception of aesthetic freedom that can be mapped onto a conception of democratic freedom. For this purpose, I bring together Charles Sanders Peirce’s ontology, which comprises fragments of an aesthetic theory, Friedrich Schiller’s concept of aesthetic play and Stanley Cavell’s democratic perfectionism. By providing a philosophical framework for constructing an aesthetics and politics that supports (...)
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  13. Democratic Freedom as an Aesthetic Achievement: Peirce, Schiller and Cavell on Aesthetic Experience, Play and Democratic Freedom.Michael Räber - forthcoming - Sage Publications Ltd: Philosophy and Social Criticism.
    Philosophy & Social Criticism, Ahead of Print. In this essay, I reconsider the constitution of democratic freedom in aesthetic terms. My interest is in articulating a conception of aesthetic freedom that can be mapped onto a conception of democratic freedom. For this purpose, I bring together Charles Sanders Peirce’s ontology, which comprises fragments of an aesthetic theory, Friedrich Schiller’s concept of aesthetic play and Stanley Cavell’s democratic perfectionism. By providing a philosophical framework for constructing an aesthetics and politics that supports (...)
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  14. Symposium on John Dewey's" Art as Experience"[Introduction].Ralph A. Smith - forthcoming - Journal of Aesthetic Education.
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  15. Tragedy as a Symbol of Autonomy in Schiller's Aesthetics.Timothy Stoll - forthcoming - British Journal of Aesthetics.
  16. Living Form and Living Criticism.Katie Terezakis - forthcoming - In Michael Thompson (ed.), Georg Lukacs Reconsidered: Essays of Politics, Philosophy, and Aesthetics. Continuu,.
  17. Concepts of Truth in Literature: A Contemporary Reading of Hartmann's Aesthetics.Íngrid Vendrell-Ferran - forthcoming - In Thomas Kessel & Friedrich Hausen (eds.), Wert und Wahrheit in der Kunst. Die Ästhetik Nicolai Hartmanns.
    This paper offers a reading of Hartmann’s philosophy of literature from the perspective of contemporary aesthetics. In particular, I focus on his defense of the truth-value of literary works. After outlining the main concern of the paper (sect. 1), I place Hartmann’s view within the context of current aesthetic cognitivism (sect. 2). In the following three sections, I discuss Hartmann’s account, examining his critique of the thesis that literature is cognitively valuable because it transmits factual truths (sect. 3); his defense (...)
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  18. Cavendish's Aesthetic Realism.Daniel Whiting - forthcoming - Philosophers' Imprint.
    In this paper, I offer a new interpretation of Margaret Cavendish’s remarks on beauty. According to it, Cavendish takes beauty to be a real, response-independent quality of objects. In this sense, Cavendish is an aesthetic realist. This position, which remains constant throughout her philosophical writings, contrasts with the non-realist views that were soon after to dominate philosophical reflections on matters of taste in the early modern period. It also, I argue, contrasts with the realism of Cavendish’s contemporary, Henry More. While (...)
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  19. Virtual Reality and Aesthetic Experience.Roberto Diodato - 2022 - Philosophies 7 (2):29.
    The problem of aesthetic experience in a virtual environment could be reformulated as: what can we learn about aesthetics from the perspective of ‘aesthetic experience in virtual environments’, given the specific nature of such an environment? The discourse goes in circles, because it is always from theories elaborated in the field of the so-called ‘real’ that we develop the difference, but it is a process typically philosophical, that, on the other hand, can make sense only if it can be shown (...)
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  20. Thick and Perceptual Moral Beauty.Ryan P. Doran - 2022 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-18.
    Which traits are beautiful? And is their beauty perceptual? It is argued that moral virtues are partly beautiful to the extent that they tend to give rise to a certain emotion— ecstasy—and that compassion tends to be more beautiful than fair-mindedness because it tends to give rise to this emotion to a greater extent. It is then argued, on the basis that emotions are best thought of as a special, evaluative, kind of perception, that this argument suggests that moral virtues (...)
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  21. Modelling Culinary Value.Patrik Engisch - 2022 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism (2):1-12.
    Culinary products have culinary value. That is, they have value qua culinary products. However, what is the nature of culinary value and what elements determine it? In the light of the central and universal role that culinary products play in our lives, offering a philosophical analysis of culinary value is a matter of interest. This paper attempts to do just this. It develops three different possible models of culinary value, two rather restricted ones and a third more encompassing one, rejects (...)
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  22. Liberal Naturalism , Aesthetic Reflection, and the Sublime.Jennifer A. McMahon - 2022 - In David Macarthur & Mario De Caro (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of Liberal Naturalism. New York, NY, USA and London UK: pp. 281-298.
    According to the scientific image, aesthetic experience is constituted by private reverie or mindless gratification of some kind. This image fails to fully acknowledge the theoretical and hence cultural aspect of perception, which includes aesthetic experience. This chapter reframes aesthetic reflective judgment in terms of perceptual processes (section 2); intentional pleasure (section 3); non-perceptually represented perceptual properties (section 4); and intersubjectivity (section 5). By clarifying the relevant terms, the liberal naturalist account of the sublime provides the link between the sublime (...)
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  23. Olafur Eliasson, The Weather Project.Jennifer A. McMahon - 2022 - Bloomsbury Contemporary Aesthetics.
    We might wonder whether there is a difference between experiencing an artwork and simply daydreaming. If the latter, would it be a matter of art communicating something or simply providing a backdrop for personal reverie? According to some influential key texts in philosophy, there is a difference. And it matters because our capacity for communicating the kind of thing art communicates, is a capacity linked to the possibility of not feeling alienated from the world and each other. In this chapter (...)
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  24. Moral Education Through Literary Aesthetic Experience: A Moral Study of the Harry Potter Series.Nirbhay Kumar Mishra & Rupkatha Ghosh - 2022 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 56 (2):101-119.
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  25. Aesthetic Perception and the Puzzle of Training.Madeleine Ransom - 2022 - Synthese 200 (2):1-25.
    While the view that we perceive aesthetic properties may seem intuitive, it has received little in the way of explicit defence. It also gives rise to a puzzle. The first strand of this puzzle is that we often cannot perceive aesthetic properties of artworks without training, yet much aesthetic training involves the acquisition of knowledge, such as when an artwork was made, and by whom. How, if at all, can this knowledge affect our perception of an artwork’s aesthetic properties? The (...)
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  26. Feeling Fit For Function: Haptic Touch and Aesthetic Experience.Tom Roberts - 2022 - British Journal of Aesthetics 62 (1):49-61.
    Traditionally, the sense of touch—alongside the senses of taste and smell—has been excluded from the aesthetic domain. These proximal modalities are thought to deliver only sensory pleasures, not the complex, world-directed perceptual states that characterize aesthetic experience. In this paper, I argue that this tradition fails to recognize the perceptual possibilities of haptic touch, which allows us to experience properties of the objects with which we make bodily contact, including their weight, shape, solidity, elasticity, and smoothness. These features, moreover, may (...)
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  27. Enacting the aesthetic: A model for raw cognitive dynamics.Carlos Vara Sánchez - 2022 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 21 (2):317-339.
    One challenge faced by aesthetics is the development of an account able to trace out the continuities and discontinuities between general experience and aesthetic experiences. Regarding this issue, in this paper, I present an enactive model of some raw cognitive dynamics that might drive the progressive emergence of aesthetic experiences from the stream of general experience. The framework is based on specific aspects of John Dewey’s pragmatist philosophy and embodied aesthetic theories, while also taking into account research in ecological psychology, (...)
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  28. Aesthetic Realism and Manifest Properties.Andrea Sauchelli - 2022 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 80 (2):201-213.
    This article outlines a realist theory of aesthetic properties as higher-order manifest properties and defends it from several objections, including a possible conflict with contextualist approaches to the aesthetic properties of works of art.
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  29. Ontological and Conceptual Challenges in the Study of Aesthetic Experience.Ioannis Xenakis & Argyris Arnellos - 2022 - Philosophical Psychology:1-43.
    We explain that most of the explanations that traditionally have been used to conceptually and ontologically differentiate aesthetic experience from any other are not compatible with a naturalistic framework, since they are based on transcendental idealistic metaphysics, reductions, and on the assumption that the aesthetic is an a priori special ontology in the object and the mind. However, contemporary works that propose as an alternative to apply directly evidence and theory from the science of emotions to the problem of aesthetics (...)
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  30. Art, Aesthetics, and the Medium: Comments for Nguyen on the Art-Status of Games.Christopher Bartel - 2021 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 48 (3):321-331.
    Nguyen offers a number of profound insights about the nature and value of games. Games are works of art, according to Nguyen, because they offer players aesthetic experiences. Game designers aim to...
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  31. “Things Begin to Speak by Themselves”: Pierre Schaeffer’s Myth of the Seashell and the Epistemology of Sound.Iain Campbell - 2021 - Sound Studies 7 (1):100-118.
    This paper considers the role of myth and phenomenology in Pierre Schaeffer’s research into music and sound, and argues that engagement with these themes allows us to rethink the legacy and contemporary value of Schaeffer’s thought in sound studies. In light of critique of Schaeffer’s project, in particular that developed by Brian Kane and Schaeffer’s own apparent self-disavowal, this paper returns to Schaeffer’s early remarks on the “myth of the seashell” in order to examine the conditions of this critique. While (...)
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  32. The Aesthetic Value of the World.Tom Cochrane - 2021 - Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.
    This book defends Aestheticism- the claim that everything is aesthetically valuable and that a life lived in pursuit of aesthetic value can be a particularly good one. Furthermore, in distilling aesthetic qualities, artists have a special role to play in teaching us to recognize values; a critical component of virtue. I ground my account upon an analysis of aesthetic value as ‘objectified final value’, which is underwritten by an original psychological claim that all aesthetic values are distal versions of practical (...)
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  33. Taste, traits, and tendencies.Alexander Dinges & Julia Zakkou - 2021 - Philosophical Studies 178 (4):1183-1206.
    Many experiential properties are naturally understood as dispositions such that e.g. a cake tastes good to you iff you are disposed to get gustatory pleasure when you eat it. Such dispositional analyses, however, face a challenge. It has been widely observed that one cannot properly assert “The cake tastes good to me” unless one has tried it. This acquaintance requirement is puzzling on the dispositional account because it should be possible to be disposed to like the cake even if this (...)
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  34. Aesthetic Experience and Moral Vision in Plato, Kant, and Murdoch: Looking Good/Being Good.Meredith Trexler Drees - 2021 - Springer Verlag.
    This book addresses how Plato, Kant, and Iris Murdoch view the connection aesthetic experience has to morality. While offering an examination of Iris Murdoch’s philosophy, it analyses deeply the suggestive links between Plato’s and Kant’s philosophies. Meredith Trexler Drees considers not only Iris Murdoch’s concept of unselfing, but also its relationship with Kant’s view of Achtung and Plato’s view of Eros. In addition, Trexler Drees suggests an extended, and partially amended, version of Murdoch’s view, arguing that it is more compatible (...)
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  35. St. Thomas and the Bard: On Beauty in the Tempest and the Limits of Aesthetic Experience.Daniel Fitzpatrick - 2021 - Studia Gilsoniana 10 (4):789-812.
    The paper addresses the matter of differences of aesthetic judgment by examining Shakespeare’s Tempest through the Thomistic understanding of substance and of beauty. It seeks principally to explore three elements of aesthetic inquiry: what characterizes the subject who perceives beauty? what characterizes the object of aesthetic experience? and how do aesthetic judgments differ from sensual perceptions? The Tempest serves as particularly fruitful territory for such exploration in virtue of the persons of Miranda and Caliban, who by the limitations of their (...)
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  36. The Evolution of Aesthetic Experience.William Hirstein - 2021 - Philosophy for Our Times.
    Our love for art is a compound byproduct of four different evolutionary events which attached reward to conscious experience itself, to the direction of attention to significant items in consciousness, to representations of scenarios in the brain's default mode network, and to the experience of novel stimuli. Aesthetic experiences contain varying amounts of these rewards, which helps to explain their diversity.
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  37. Kierkegaard, Mimesis, and Modernity: A Study of Imitation, Existence, and Affect.Wojciech Kaftanski - 2021 - Routledge.
    This book challenges the widespread view of Kierkegaard’s idiosyncratic and predominantly religious position on mimesis. -/- Taking mimesis as a crucial conceptual point of reference in reading Kierkegaard, this book offers a nuanced understanding of the relation between aesthetics and religion in his thought. Kaftanski shows how Kierkegaard's dialectical-existential reading of mimesis interlaces aesthetic and religious themes, including the familiar core concepts of imitation, repetition, and admiration as well as the newly arisen notions of affectivity, contagion, and crowd behavior. Kierkegaard’s (...)
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  38. Aesthetic Experience as a Framing of Reality: The Impact of Digital Media on Visual Perception, Between Pandemic Context and Museum Approach.Caterina Zaira Laskaris - 2021 - Aisthesis: Pratiche, Linguaggi E Saperi Dell’Estetico 14 (2):123-133.
    The situation caused by the coronavirus pandemic has not qualitatively changed our aesthetic experience, but rather intensified certain perceptual habits that had already been in place for quite a long time, highlighting their characteristics. In particular, the relationship between movement and framing and our close familiarity with digital media in the visual aesthetic experience. This aspect has been acknowledged in the museum context, but we are still at the beginning of a path leading to a more conscious implementation of the (...)
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  39. Aesthetic Self-Forgetfulness.Harri Mäcklin - 2021 - British Journal of Aesthetics 61 (4):527-541.
    Intense aesthetic experiences are often described in terms of self-forgetfulness, where the perceiver becomes immersed in the aesthetic phenomenon to the extent of losing consciousness of being the subject of the experience. Although such experiences have been described from the early eighteenth century onwards, there is still a surprising lack of detailed investigation on the precise nature of aesthetic self-forgetfulness. What happens in this experience, and precisely what is the ‘self’ that is forgotten? Building on phenomenological theories of self-consciousness, I (...)
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  40. Orgasm and Art.Karl Pfeifer - 2021 - Academic Voices 2021:18-20.
    Karl Pfeifer argues against the view that an aesthetic experience must be a uniquely special kind of experience by means of an analogy with sexual experiences. Nonetheless, he leaves open the possibility that some aesthetic experiences might still be of a special kind.
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  41. How Museums Make Us Feel: Affective Niche Construction and the Museum of Non-Objective Painting.Jussi A. Saarinen - 2021 - British Journal of Aesthetics 61 (4):543-558.
    Art museums are built to elicit a wide variety of feelings, emotions, and moods from their visitors. While these effects are primarily achieved through the artworks on display, museums commonly deploy numerous other affect-inducing resources as well, including architectural solutions, audio guides, lighting fixtures, and informational texts. Art museums can thus be regarded as spaces that are designed to influence affective experiencing through multiple structures and mechanisms. At face value, this may seem like a somewhat self-evident and trivial statement to (...)
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  42. Aesthetic Experience at the Borders of Art and Life: The Case of the Man in Gold.Richard Shusterman - 2021 - Eidos. A Journal for Philosophy of Culture 5 (2):103-111.
    Preview: Beyond Baumgarten, the modern field of aesthetics can be seen as an attempt to go beyond the limits of older philosophies of beauty, sublimity, and taste in order to engage a much wider domain of qualities and judgments relating to our pleasurable and meaningful experiences of art and nature. The defining strategy of Hegelian aesthetics is to take the essence of aesthetics beyond the limits of nonconceptual sensuous experience and to celebrate instead the idea of art as purveying the (...)
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  43. How Artworks Modify Our Perception of the World.Alfredo Vernazzani - 2021 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences:1-22.
    Many artists, art critics, and poets suggest that an aesthetic appreciation of artworks may modify our perception of the world, including quotidian things and scenes. I call this Art-to-World, AtW. Focusing on visual artworks, in this paper I articulate an empirically-informed account of AtW that is based on content related views of aesthetic experience, and on Goodman’s and Elgin’s concept of exemplification. An aesthetic encounter with artworks demands paying attention to its aesthetic, expressive, or design properties that realize its purpose. (...)
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  44. Blackening Aesthetic Experience.Nicholas Whittaker - 2021 - The Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 79 (4):452–464.
    Contemporary philosophy of art generally assumes that aesthetic experience is constituted by a certain ontological-phenomenological structure: the apprehension by a subject of an object. This article explores an underexamined critique of this philosophical model found within the black intellectual and artistic tradition. I will specifically focus on the version of this critique proposed by the similarly underexamined black philosophers Adrian Piper and Fred Moten. This critique, which I dub the subjectivizing concern, takes issue with the notion of ontological distance that (...)
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  45. The Interpersonal Variability of Gustatory Sensation and the Prospects for an Alimentary Aesthetics.Vaughn Bryan Baltzly - 2020 - Intervalla 7 (1):6-16.
    We all have different “tastes” for different tastes: some of us have a sweet tooth, while others prefer more subtle flavors; some crave spicy foods, while others cannot stand them. As Bourdieu and others have pointed out, these varying judgments seem to be more than mere preferences; often they reflect (and partially constitute) differences of class and culture. But I want to suggest that we’ve possibly overlooked another important source of these divergent gastronomic evaluations, other than hierarchy and caste: mere (...)
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  46. “Categories of Art” at 50: An IntroductionSymposium: “Categories of Art” at 50.Dan Cavedon-Taylor - 2020 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 78 (1):65-66.
    Introduction to a symposium in The Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism on the 50th anniversary of Kendall Walton's "Categories of Art." Featuring papers by Madeleine Ransom, Stacie Friend, David Davies and Kendall Walton.
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  47. Still Life, a Mirror: Phasic Memory and Re-Encounters with Artworks.Clare Mac Cumhaill - 2020 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 11 (2):423-446.
    Re-encountering certain kinds of artworks in the present (re-listening to music, re- reading novels) can often occasion a kind of recollection akin to episodic recollection, but which may be better cast as ‘phasic’, at least insofar as one can be said to remember ‘what it was like’ to be oneself at some earlier stage or phase in one’s personal history. The kinds of works that prompt such recollection, I call ‘still lives’ - they are limited wholes whose formal properties are (...)
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  48. Review of Art and Form: From Roger Fry to Global Modernism by Sam Rose. [REVIEW]Michalle Gal - 2020 - Estetica European Journal of Aesthetics 57:183-188.
    In view of the current progress of what has been named the ‘visual turn’ or the ‘pictorial turn’,1 it is exciting to witness Sam Rose’s return to early aesthetic formalist-modernism, which was so passionate about the medium, its appearance, and visuality. Rose’s project shares a recent inclination to think anew the advent of aesthetic modernism.2 It is founded on the presumption that visual art ought to be – and actually has always been – theoretically subsumed under one meta-project. This meta-project (...)
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  49. Materials and Meaning in Contemporary Sculpture.Sherri Irvin - 2020 - In Kristin Gjesdal, Fred Rush & Ingvild Torsen (eds.), Philosophy of Sculpture: Historical Problems, Contemporary Approaches. Routledge. pp. 165-186.
    An extensive literature about pictorial representation discusses what is involved when a two-dimensional image represents some specific object or type of object. A smaller literature addresses parallel issues in sculptural representation. But little has been said about the role played by the sculptural material itself in determining the meanings of the sculptural work. Appealing to Nelson Goodman and Catherine Elgin’s discussions of literal and metaphorical exemplification, I argue that the material of which a sculpture is constituted plays key roles in (...)
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  50. Feeling the Aesthetic: A Pluralist Sentimentalist Theory of Aesthetic Experience.Rasmus Rosenberg Larsen & David Sackris - 2020 - Estetika 57 (2):116–134.
    Sentimentalist aesthetic theories, broadly construed, posit that emotions play a fundamental role in aesthetic experiences. Jesse Prinz has recently proposed a reductionistic version of sentimentalist aesthetics, suggesting that it is the discrete feeling of wonder that makes an experience aesthetic. In this contribution, we draw on Prinz’s proposal in order to outline a novel version of a sentimentalist theory. Contrasting Prinz’s focus on a single emotion, we argue that an aesthetic experience is rudimentarily composed of a plurality of emotions. We (...)
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1 — 50 / 903