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  1. Moved by Music Alone.Tom Cochrane - forthcoming - British Journal of Aesthetics.
    In this paper I present an account of musical arousal that takes into account key demands of formalist philosophers such as Peter Kivy and Nick Zangwill. Formalists prioritise our understanding and appreciation of the music itself. As a result, they demand that any feelings we have in response to music must be directed at the music alone, without being distracted by non-musical associations. To accommodate these requirements I appeal to a mechanism of contagion which I synthesize with the expectation-based arousal (...)
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  2. The Aesthetic Value of the World.Tom Cochrane - forthcoming - Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.
    This book defends Aestheticism- the claim that everything is aesthetically valuable and that a life lived in pursuit of aesthetic value can be a particularly good one. Furthermore, in distilling aesthetic qualities, artists have a special role to play in teaching us to recognize values; a critical component of virtue. I ground my account upon an analysis of aesthetic value as ‘objectified final value’, which is underwritten by an original psychological claim that all aesthetic values are distal versions of practical (...)
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  3. Musical Scaffolding and the Pleasure of Sad Music: Comment on “An Integrative Review of the Enjoyment of Sadness Associated with Music".Joel Krueger - forthcoming - Physics of Life Reviews.
    Why is listening to sad music pleasurable? Eerola et al. convincingly argue that we should adopt an integrative framework — encompassing biological, psycho-social, and cultural levels of explanation — to answer this question. I agree. The authors have done a great service in providing the outline of such an integrative account. But in their otherwise rich discussion of the psycho-social level of engagements with sad music, they say little about the phenomenology of such experiences — including features that may help (...)
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  4. Consciousness.Anezka Kuzmicova - forthcoming - In Leah Price & Matthew Rubery (eds.), Further Reading. New York: Oxford University Press.
    This chapter revisits three common ideas about how consciousness works when we read fiction. Firstly, I contest the notion that the reading consciousness is a container of sorts, containing a circumscribed amount of textual stimulus. Secondly, I argue against the view that readers abstract their personal concerns away in reading, and that they do so with benefit. Thirdly, I show how the reading consciousness encompasses rather than excludes the physical situation and environment of reading. For each idea revisited, I discuss (...)
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  5. On Liking Aesthetic Value.Keren Gorodeisky - 2021 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 102 (2):261-280.
    According to tradition, aesthetic value is non-contingently connected to a certain feeling of liking or pleasure. Is that true? Two answers are on offer in the field of aesthetics today: 1. The Hedonist answers: Yes, aesthetic value is non-contingently connected to pleasure insofar as this value is constituted and explained by the power of its possessors to please (under standard conditions). 2. The Non-Affectivist answers: No. At best, pleasure is contingently related to aesthetic value. The aim of this paper is (...)
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  6. Beyond the Pleasure Principle: A Kantian Aesthetics of Autonomy.Dominic McIver Lopes - 2021 - Estetika 58 (1):1-18.
    Aesthetic hedonism is the view that to be aesthetically good is to please. For most aesthetic hedonists, aesthetic normativity is hedonic normativity. This paper argues that Kant's third critique contains resources for a non-hedonic account of aesthetic normativity as sourced in autonomy as self-legislation. A case is made that the account is also Kant's because it ties his aesthetics into a key theme of his larger philosophy.
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  7. Aesthetics of Food Porn.Uku Tooming - 2021 - Critica 53 (157):123-146.
    Enticing food photography which stimulates its viewers’ cravings, often given a dismissive label “food porn,” is one of the most popular contents in contemporary digital media. In this paper, I argue that the label disguises different ways in which a viewer can engage with it. In particular, food porn enables us to engage in cross-modal gustatory imaginings of a specific kind and an image’s capacity to afford such imaginings can contribute to its artistic merit.
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  8. Functional Beauty, Pleasure, and Experience.Panos Paris - 2020 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 98 (3):516-530.
    I offer a set of sufficient conditions for beauty, drawing on Parsons and Carlson’s account of ‘functional beauty’. First, I argue that their account is flawed, whilst falling short of...
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  9. Heaven on Earth. On Systematicity and Aesthetic Pleasure.Fernando-M. F. Silva - 2020 - Anuario Filosófico 53 (1).
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  10. San Alberto Magno y las bellas artes.David Torrijos-Castrillejo - 2020 - de Medio Aevo 14:117-129.
    This article aims to address the widespread thesis according to which medieval scholastics would not handle the idea of fine art. Based on a suggestion by Anzulewicz, the author shows how Albert the Great did understand the peculiarity of fine arts and put them in close relationship with liberal arts. There are fine arts, such as music, which are sought after for their own sake and can, therefore, be considered as fully liberal. In contrast to them, there are other arts (...)
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  11. Social Aesthetics and Moral Judgment: Pleasure, Reflection and Accountability. [REVIEW]Servaas van der Berg - 2020 - British Journal of Aesthetics 60 (1):92–95.
    McMahon, Jennifer A. Routledge. 2018. pp. 230. £115.
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  12. On Liking and Enjoyment: Reassessing Geiger’s Account of Aesthetic Pleasure.Íngrid Vendrell-Ferran - 2020 - Metodo. International Studies in Phenomenology and Philosophy 8 (2):207 - 232.
    This paper examines the notion of aesthetic pleasure within the framework of an aesthetics of value. The topic is introduced in sect. 1, while sect. 2 presents Moritz Geiger’s distinction between two kinds of aesthetic pleasure: liking, which enables us to grasp the aesthetic values of the artwork; and enjoyment, which is understood to be an emotional response. Sect. 3 reassesses the main tenets of Geiger’s account in the light of current research. In particular, I provide arguments in favor of (...)
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  13. Aesthetic Pleasure Explained.Rafael De Clercq - 2019 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 77 (2):121-132.
    One of the oldest platitudes about beauty is that it is pleasant to perceive or experience. In this article, I take this platitude at face value and try to explain why experiences of beauty are seemingly always accompanied by pleasure. Unlike explanations that have been offered in the past, the explanation proposed is designed to suit a “realist” view on which beauty is an irreducibly evaluative property, that is, a value. In a nutshell, the explanation is that experiences of beauty (...)
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  14. The Authority of Pleasure.Keren Gorodeisky - 2019 - Noûs 55 (1):199-220.
    The aim of the paper is to reassess the prospects of a widely neglected affective conception of the aesthetic evaluation and appreciation of art. On the proposed picture, the aesthetic evaluation and appreciation of art are non-contingently constituted by a particular kind of pleasure. Artworks that are valuable qua artworks merit, deserve, and call for a certain pleasure, the same pleasure that reveals (or at least purports to reveal) them to be valuable in the way that they are, and constitutes (...)
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  15. Toward a Naturalized Aesthetics of Film Music: An Interdisciplinary Exploration of Intramusical and Extramusical Meaning.Timothy Justus - 2019 - Projections 13 (3):1–22.
    In this article, I first address the question of how musical forms come to represent meaning—that is, the semantics of music—and illustrate an important conceptual distinction articulated by Leonard Meyer in Emotion and Meaning in Music between absolute or intramusical meaning and referential or extramusical meaning through a critical analysis of two recent films. Second, building examples of scholarship around a single piece of music frequently used in film—Samuel Barber's Adagio for Strings—I follow the example set by Murray Smith in (...)
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  16. Feeling for Freedom: K. C. Bhattacharyya on Rasa.Dominic McIver Lopes - 2019 - British Journal of Aesthetics 59 (4):465-477.
    Aesthetic hedonists agree that an aesthetic value is a property of an item that stands in some constitutive relation to pleasure. Surprisingly, however, aesthetic hedonists need not reduce aesthetic normativity to hedonic normativity. They might demarcate aesthetic value as a species of hedonic value, but deny that the reason we have to appreciate an item is simply that it pleases. Such is the approach taken by an important strand of South Asian rasa theory that is represented with great clarity and (...)
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  17. The Default Theory of Aesthetic Value.James Shelley - 2019 - British Journal of Aesthetics 59 (1):1-12.
    The default theory of aesthetic value combines hedonism about aesthetic value with strict perceptual formalism about aesthetic value, holding the aesthetic value of an object to be the value it has in virtue of the pleasure it gives strictly in virtue of its perceptual properties. A standard theory of aesthetic value is any theory of aesthetic value that takes the default theory as its theoretical point of departure. This paper argues that standard theories fail because they theorize from the default (...)
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  18. Tragic Pleasure From Homer to Plato by Rana Saadi Liebert.Eirene Visvardi - 2019 - American Journal of Philology 140 (1):167-171.
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  19. Rationally Agential Pleasure? A Kantian Proposal.Keren Gorodeisky - 2018 - In Lisa Shapiro (ed.), Pleasure: a History. Oxford University Press. pp. 167-194.
    The main claim of the paper is that, on Kant's account, aesthetic pleasure is an exercise of rational agency insofar as, when proper, it has the following two features: (1) It is an affective responsiveness to the question: “what is to be felt disinterestedly”? As such, it involves consciousness of its ground (the reasons for having it) and thus of itself as properly responsive to its object. (2) Its actuality depends on endorsement: actually feeling it involves its endorsement as an (...)
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  20. Aesthetic Rationality.Keren Gorodeisky & Eric Marcus - 2018 - Journal of Philosophy 115 (3):113-140.
    We argue that the aesthetic domain falls inside the scope of rationality, but does so in its own way. Aesthetic judgment is a stance neither on whether a proposition is to be believed nor on whether an action is to be done, but on whether an object is to be appreciated. Aesthetic judgment is simply appreciation. Correlatively, reasons supporting theoretical, practical and aesthetic judgments operate in fundamentally different ways. The irreducibility of the aesthetic domain is due to the fact that (...)
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  21. Aesthetic Comprehension of Abstract and Emotion Concepts: Kant’s Aesthetics Renewed.Mojca Küplen - 2018 - Itinera 15:39-56.
    In § 49 of the Critique of the Power of Judgment Kant puts forward a view that the feeling of pleasure in the experience of the beautiful can be stimulated not merely by perceptual properties, but by ideas and thoughts as well. The aim of this paper is to argue that aesthetic ideas fill in the emptiness that abstract and emotion concepts on their own would have without empirical intuitions. That is, aesthetic ideas make these concepts more accessible to us, (...)
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  22. Art, Pleasure, Value: Reframing the Questions.Mohan Matthen - 2018 - Philosophic Exchange 47 (1).
    In this essay, I’ll argue, first, that an art object's aesthetic value (or merit) depends not just on its intrinsic properties, but on the response it evokes from a consumer who shares the producer's cultural background. My question is: what is the role of culture in relation to this response? I offer a new account of aesthetic pleasure that answers this question. On this account, aesthetic pleasure is not just a “feeling” or “sensation” that results from engaging with a work (...)
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  23. Social Aesthetics and Moral Judgment: Pleasure, Reflection and Accountability.Jennifer A. McMahon (ed.) - 2018 - New York, USA: Routledge.
    This edited collection sets forth a new understanding of aesthetic-moral judgment organised around three key concepts: pleasure, reflection, and accountability. The overarching theme is that art is not merely a representation or expression like any other, but that it promotes shared moral understanding and helps us engage in meaning-making. This volume offers an alternative to brain-centric and realist approaches to aesthetics. It features original essays from a number of leading philosophers of art, aesthetics, ethics, and perception, including Elizabeth Burns Coleman, (...)
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  24. The Relation Between Sensory Perception,Perfection and Pleasure with Beauty in Christian Wolff’s Aesthetics.Davoud Mirzaei, Ali Salmani & Reza Mahoozi - 2018 - Journal of Philosophical Theological Research 20 (75):72-92.
    Christian Wolff’s view regarding sensory perception – which is formed on a Leibnizian framework – forms the base of his aesthetics. He explains the concept of perfection and pleasure according to the clear but disordered essence of sensory perception that is present in this framework and through this very path guides towards the definition of beauty. Thus, according to him, perfection is the consistency or accordance of diversity or the abundance of things or their parts; pleasure is the result of (...)
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  25. Defamiliarization and the Unprompted (Not Innocent) Eye.Bence Nanay - 2018 - Nonsite 24:1-17.
    A distinctive feature of Russian formalism, something we do not see in Bell and Fry or in Wölfflin and Riegl (or see it more rarely, see Section IV below), is this emphasis on the analysis of everyday perception and the ways in which art encourages us to perceive differently. But it is difficult not to read the concept of defamiliarization as a naïve early statement of what art historians and aestheticians of the second half of the 20th century criticized as (...)
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  26. The Pleasure of Pictures: Pictorial Experience and Aesthetic Appreciation.Jérôme Pelletier & Alberto Voltolini (eds.) - 2018 - Routledge.
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  27. Editorial: Music and the Functions of the Brain: Arousal, Emotions, and Pleasure.Mark Reybrouck, Tuomas Eerola & Piotr Podlipniak - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
    Music impinges upon the body and the brain and has inductive power, relying on both innate dispositions and acquired mechanisms for coping with the sounds. This process is partly autonomous and partly deliberate, but multiple interrelations between several levels of processing can be shown. There is, further, a tradition in neuroscience that divides the organization of the brain into lower and higher functions. The latter have received a lot of attention in music and brain studies during the last decades. Recent (...)
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  28. Kant on Informed Pure Judgments of Taste.Emine Hande Tuna - 2018 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 76 (2):163-174.
    Two dominant interpretations of Kant's notion of adherent beauty, the conjunctive view and the incorporation view, provide an account of how to form informed aesthetic assessments concerning artworks. According to both accounts, judgments of perfection play a crucial role in making informed, although impure, judgments of taste. These accounts only examine aesthetic responses to objects that meet or fail to meet the expectations we have regarding what they ought to be. I demonstrate that Kant's works of genius do not fall (...)
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  29. Pleasure's Place.Karl Ameriks - 2017 - Australasian Philosophical Review 1 (1):67-72.
    ABSTRACTMatthen usefully distinguishes between mere ‘r-pleasures’ and ‘f-pleasures’: ‘facilitating’ pleasures that are valuable in drawing out the ‘self-reinforcing’ characteristic of good art. But there are reasons, especially from a Kantian Critical perspective with which Matthen sympathizes, to worry about any such ‘hedonistic’ approach to aesthetics, however valuable its general account of pleasure may be. Especially deserving of emphasis are the role of objectivity and the significance of aesthetic goals other than pleasure.
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  30. 1. Pleasure.Michel Chaouli - 2017 - In Thinking with Kant’s _critique of Judgment_. Harvard University Press. pp. 3-41.
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  31. Commentary: Aesthetic Pleasure Versus Aesthetic Interest: The Two Routes to Aesthetic Liking.Consoli Gianluca - 2017 - Frontiers in Psychology 8.
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  32. Restorative Aesthetic Pleasures and the Restoration of Pleasure.Ryan Paul Doran - 2017 - Australasian Philosophical Review 1 (1):73-78.
    ABSTRACT: I argue, contra Mohan Matthen, that at least some aesthetic pleasures arising from the appreciation of aesthetic features of artworks are what he calls ‘r-pleasures’ as opposed to ‘f-pleasures’—and moreover, that the paradigm aesthetic pleasure appears to be an r-pleasure on Matthen's terms. I then argue that talk of r- and f-pleasures does not distinguish different kinds, but two different features of pleasure; so this supposed distinction cannot be used to characterize a sui generis aesthetic pleasure.
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  33. Comments on Mohan Matthen's ‘The Pleasure of Art’.Cynthia A. Freeland - 2017 - Australasian Philosophical Review 1 (1):29-39.
    ABSTRACTThis paper examines Mohan Matthen's account of aesthetic pleasure. The first part explores implications of Matthen's notion of ‘fit’ between features of art objects and our pleasurable contemplation of them. Through historical comparisons with Plato and Dewey, I challenge his claim not to be offering a theory of aesthetic norms. The second part of my paper sketches how Matthen might address two important problems of contemporary aesthetics: the first concerning interpretation, and the second concerning genres of art that evoke negative (...)
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  34. Value First: Comments on Mohan Matthen’s ‘The Pleasure of Art’.Keren Gorodeisky - 2017 - Australasian Philosophical Review 1 (1):79-84.
    While I welcome Mohan Matthen’s insistence that art is connected to aesthetic pleasure, I worry about his commitment to viewing pleasure as prior to, and constitutive of, the value of art. I raise my reservations by (i) dispelling his criticism of the reversed explanatory direction, and (ii) showing problems for his commitment. As an alternative, I offer an account of pleasure that explains it in terms of the independent value of art—an account that is free of the problems Matthen raises (...)
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  35. A Complex of Pleasures: Comment on ‘The Pleasure of Art’ by Mohan Matthen.Paul Guyer - 2017 - Australasian Philosophical Review 1 (1):40-49.
    ABSTRACTMatthen's functionalist account of art and his activity-centred account of aesthetic pleasure are on the right track, but he should recognize the importance of emotional as well as cognitive engagement with art.
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  36. Pleasure of Art and Pleasure of Nature: A Response to Matthen.Jane Kneller - 2017 - Australasian Philosophical Review 1 (1):85-89.
    ABSTRACTI argue that by limiting the objects of genuine or purely aesthetic pleasure to the products of human artifice, Matthen wrongly excludes aesthetic pleasure in natural items. Cases of aesthetic reflection that yield the ‘facilitating pleasure’ he takes to be definitive of our experience of art regularly occur also in our aesthetic experience of nature. That is, many kinds of aesthetic appreciation of nature meet his criteria of ‘learned’ engagements that are ‘difficult’ and ‘costly’. Aesthetic appreciation of nature thus represents (...)
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  37. The Enjoyment of Negative Emotions in the Experience of Magic.Jason Leddington - 2017 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 40.
    Theatrical magic is designed to elicit negative emotions such as feelings of vulnerability, loss of control, apprehension, fear, confusion, and bafflement. This commentary suggests that the DISTANCE-EMBRACING model proposed by Menninghaus et al. can help us to understand how the experience of magic can be aesthetically pleasurable, not despite, rather thanks to, some of the strong negative emotions it provokes.
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  38. Is There Really A Puzzle Over Negative Emotions And Aesthetic Pleasure?María José Alcaraz León - 2017 - Nordic Journal of Aesthetics 25 (52).
    Two seemingly contradictory aspects have marked art’s appreciation – and aesthetic appreciation in general. While an experience of pleasure seems to ground judgments of aesthetic value, some artworks seem to gain our praise by the very negative – unpleasant – experience they provoke. Known as the paradox of negative emotions, aestheticians have, at least since Aristotle, tried to deal with these cases and offer different explanations of the phenomenon. In this article, María José Alcaraz León does not directly offer an (...)
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  39. Tragic Pleasure From Homer to Plato.Rana Saadi Liebert - 2017 - Cambridge University Press.
    This book offers a resolution of the paradox posed by the pleasure of tragedy by returning to its earliest articulations in archaic Greek poetry and its subsequent emergence as a philosophical problem in Plato's Republic. Socrates' claim that tragic poetry satisfies our 'hunger for tears' hearkens back to archaic conceptions of both poetry and mourning that suggest a common source of pleasure in the human appetite for heightened forms of emotional distress. By unearthing a psychosomatic model of aesthetic engagement implicit (...)
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  40. The Pleasure of Art.Mohan Matthen - 2017 - Australasian Philosophical Review 1 (1):6-28.
    This paper presents a new account of aesthetic pleasure, according to which it is a distinct psychological structure marked by a characteristic self-reinforcing motivation. Pleasure figures in the appreciation of an object in two ways: In the short run, when we are in contact with particular artefacts on particular occasions, aesthetic pleasure motivates engagement and keeps it running smoothly—it may do this despite the fact that the object we engagement is aversive in some ways. Over longer periods, it plays a (...)
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  41. Constructing Aesthetic Value: Responses to My Commentators.Mohan Matthen - 2017 - Australasian Philosophical Review 1 (1):100-111.
    This is a response to invited and submitted commentary on "The Pleasure of Art," published in Australasian Philosophical Reviews 1, 1 (2017). In it, I expand on my view of aesthetic pleasure, particularly how the distinction between facilitating pleasure and relief pleasure works. In response to critics who discerned and were uncomfortable with the aesthetic hedonism that they found in the work, I develop that aspect of my view. My position is that the aesthetic value of a work of art (...)
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  42. From Kantianism to Aesthetic Hedonism: Aesthetic Pleasure Revised.Jennifer A. McMahon - 2017 - Australasian Philosophical Review 1 (1):1-5.
    No matter how unintuitive it might seem that aesthetic pleasure should be the point where art and morality meet, this is a noteworthy possibility that has been overshadowed by aestheticians’ more visible concerns. Here I briefly survey relevant strands in the literature over the past century, before introducing themes covered in this inaugural issue of Australasian Philosophical Review.
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  43. Straddling the Senses of a Contested Term: A Comment on the Use of ‘Aesthetic’ in Mohan Matthen's ‘The Pleasure of Art’.James Phillips - 2017 - Australasian Philosophical Review 1 (1):90-94.
    ABSTRACTMatthen proposes a functional definition of art as that which is designed to elicit what he calls facilitating pleasure. While this definition has the air of a theory that unites disparate strands of aesthetic thought over the last several centuries, the linkages it assumes between pleasure and art require a support stronger than the historical polysemy of the contested term ‘aesthetic’. The co-existence of meanings within the tradition is not itself evidence that these meanings are philosophically co-ordinated. To define art (...)
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  44. Naturästhetik in der Planungsethik.Gesine Schepers - 2017 - In Karsten Berr (ed.), Architektur- und Planungsethik. Zugänge, Perspektiven, Standpunkte. RaumFragen: Stadt – Region – Landschaft. Wiesbaden: Springer. pp. 195-203.
  45. Pleasure, Art, Culture: Remarks on Mohan Matthen's ‘The Pleasure of Art’.Robert Sinnerbrink - 2017 - Australasian Philosophical Review 1 (1):50-60.
    ABSTRACTIn response to Mohan Matthen's ‘The Pleasure of Art’, I identify three issues that deserve further critical engagement: the scope of his definition of aesthetic pleasure, the role of culture in shoring up its communal and communicable character, and the need to include an account of aesthetic properties in his psychologically grounded approach to aesthetic pleasure. Without due acknowledgment of both aesthetic properties and the intersubjective role of culture, Matthen's activity-based theory of aesthetic pleasure risks lapsing into subjectivism, thereby losing (...)
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  46. Constituents of Music and Visual-Art Related Pleasure – A Critical Integrative Literature Review.Marianne Tiihonen, Elvira Brattico, Johanna Maksimainen, Jan Wikgren & Suvi Saarikallio - 2017 - Frontiers in Psychology 8.
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  47. The Possibility of Culture: Pleasure and Moral Development in Kant’s Aesthetics. [REVIEW]Iris Vidmar - 2017 - Croatian Journal of Philosophy 17 (3):453-459.
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  48. James Warren, “The Pleasures of Reason in Plato, Aristotle, and the Hellenistic Hedonists.” Review by Facundo Bey. [REVIEW]Facundo Bey - 2016 - Boletín de Estética 36:71-76.
    The Pleasures of Reason in Plato, Aristotle, and the Hellenistic Hedonists se centra en la relación mutua entre las capacidades humanas de sentir placer y dolor y el carácter afectivo que las une con las facultades cognitivas de aprender, comprender, recordar, evocar, planificar y anticiparse. Para esto, Warren consagra toda su agudeza analítica a eminentes obras del pensamiento antiguo: particularmente nos referimos a los diálogos platónicos República, Protágoras y Filebo. Otro tanto hace con De Anima, De Memoria et Reminiscentia, Ética (...)
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  49. Acknowledgement and the Paradox of Tragedy.Daan Evers & Natalja Deng - 2016 - Philosophical Studies 173 (2):337-350.
    We offer a new answer to the paradox of tragedy. We explain part of the appeal of tragic art in terms of its acknowledgement of sad aspects of life and offer a tentative explanation of why acknowledgement is a source of pleasure.
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  50. Audiobooks and Print Narrative: Similarities in Text Experience.Anezka Kuzmicova - 2016 - In Jarmila Mildorf & Till Kinzel (eds.), Audionarratology: Interfaces of Sound and Narrative. De Gruyter. pp. 217-237.
    Comparisons between audiobook listening and print reading often boil down to the fact that audiobooks impose limitations on the recipient’s continuous in-depth reflection. As a result, audiobook listening is considered a shallow alternative to reading. This chapter critically revisits the following three intuitions commonly associated with such comparisons: 1) Audiobooks elicit more mental imagery than print. 2) Audiobooks invite more inattentive processing than print. 3) Audiobook listening is more contingent on the environment than print reading. Instead of postulating the superiority (...)
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