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  1. Review of Marshall, Pain, Pleasure, and Aesthetics. [REVIEW][author unknown] - 1893 - The Monist 4:630-631.
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  2. Review of Marshall, Pain, Pleasure, and Aesthetics. [REVIEW][author unknown] - 1893 - Ancient Philosophy 4:630.
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  3. The Sublime Pleasures of Tragedy: A Study of Critical Theory From Dennis to Keats.William Price Albrecht - 1975 - University Press of Kansas.
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  4. Beauty, Art and the Western Tradition.Derek Allan - manuscript
    From the Renaissance onwards, the Western tradition singled out the term beauty for a unique and highly prestigious role. As Christian belief began its gradual decline, Renaissance art invented a rival transcendence in the form of an exalted world of nobility, harmony and beauty – the world exemplified by the works of painters such as Raphael, Titian and Poussin. Beauty in this sense quickly became the ruling ideal of Western art, subsequently underpinning the explanations of the nature and function of (...)
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  5. A Cognitive Interpretation of Aristotle’s Concepts of Catharsis and Tragic Pleasure.Mahesh Ananth - 2014 - International Journal of Art and Art History 2 (2).
    Jonathan Lear argues that the established purgation, purification, and cognitive stimulation interpretations of Aristotle’s concepts of catharsis and tragic pleasure are off the mark. In response, Lear defends an anti-cognitivist account, arguing that it is the pleasure associated with imaginatively “living life to the full” and yet hazarding nothing of importance that captures Aristotle’s understanding of catharsis and tragic pleasure. This analysis reveals that Aristotle’s account of imagination in conjunction with his understanding of both specific intellectual virtues and rational emotions (...)
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  6. Review of Eva Schaper, Pleasure, Preference and Value. [REVIEW]Douglas Anderson - 1986 - Idealistic Studies 16 (2):186-187.
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  7. The Secret Power of Beauty.John Armstrong - 2004 - Allen Lane.
    A graceful and lucid study of the power of beauty and the deep significance it has in our lives In defining beauty and our response to it, we are often caught between the concrete and the sublime. We wish to categorize beauty, to clearly label its parts, and yet we wish also to celebrate its mysterious-and at times mythical-power. Armstrong's response is a discursive and graceful journey through various and complementary interpretations, leading us from Hogarth's belief that the essence of (...)
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  8. From Pleasure to Contemplation.Rudolf Arnheim - 1993 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 51 (2):195-197.
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  9. Beauty Defined.Archie J. Bahm - 1947 - Philosophical Review 56 (5):582-586.
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  10. The Paradox of Horror: Fear as a Positive Emotion.Katerina Bantinaki - 2012 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 70 (4):2012.
  11. Erotic Pathos, Rhetorical Pleasure: Narrative Technique and Mimesis in Eumathios Makrembolites' "Hysmine & Hysminias"Ingela Nilsson.Roderick Beaton - 2004 - Speculum 79 (3):811-813.
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  12. Der Letzte Advent. By Edzard Schaper.Leo A. Behrendt - 1951 - Renascence 4 (1):67-68.
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  13. Pleasure, Tragedy and Aristotelian Psychology.Elizabeth Belfiore - 1985 - Classical Quarterly 35 (02):349-.
    Aristotle's Rhetoric defines fear as a kind of pain or disturbance and pity as a kind of pain . In his Poetics, however, pity and fear are associated with pleasure: ‘ The poet must provide the pleasure that comes from pity and fear by means of imitation’ . The question of the relationship between pleasure and pain in Aristotle's aesthetics has been studied primarily in connection with catharsis. Catharsis, however, raises more problems than it solves. Aristotle says nothing at all (...)
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  14. Pleasure, Tragedy and Aristotelian Psychology.Elizabeth Belfiore - 1985 - Classical Quarterly 35 (2):349-361.
    Aristotle's Rhetoric defines fear as a kind of pain or disturbance and pity as a kind of pain. In his Poetics, however, pity and fear are associated with pleasure: ‘ The poet must provide the pleasure that comes from pity and fear by means of imitation’. The question of the relationship between pleasure and pain in Aristotle's aesthetics has been studied primarily in connection with catharsis. Catharsis, however, raises more problems than it solves. Aristotle says nothing at all about the (...)
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  15. Economy of Expression and Aesthetic Pleasure.Ermanno Bencivenga - 1987 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 47 (4):615-630.
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  16. Utitz, Emil. Die Funktionsfreuden Im Ästhetischen Verhalten. [REVIEW]Hugo Bergmann - 1911 - Kant-Studien 16 (1-3):325.
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  17. James Warren, “The Pleasures of Reason in Plato, Aristotle, and the Hellenistic Hedonists.” Review by Facundo Bey. [REVIEW]Facundo Bey - 2016 - Boletín de Estética 36:71-76.
    The Pleasures of Reason in Plato, Aristotle, and the Hellenistic Hedonists se centra en la relación mutua entre las capacidades humanas de sentir placer y dolor y el carácter afectivo que las une con las facultades cognitivas de aprender, comprender, recordar, evocar, planificar y anticiparse. Para esto, Warren consagra toda su agudeza analítica a eminentes obras del pensamiento antiguo: particularmente nos referimos a los diálogos platónicos República, Protágoras y Filebo. Otro tanto hace con De Anima, De Memoria et Reminiscentia, Ética (...)
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  18. Aesthetic Pleasure: Cognition and Emotion in the Aesthetic Concepts. Remarks After Sibley’s Works.Giulia Bonasio - 2014 - Rivista di Estetica 55:183-201.
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  19. Aesthetic Aristotelic Project: Between Art and Pleasure.Magdalena Bosch - 2011 - Convivium: revista de filosofía 24:43-57.
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  20. Kierkegaard: Ethical Marriage or Aesthetic Pleasure?Patrick Bourgeois - 1976 - The Personalist (4):370-375.
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  21. On Susan Wolf’s “Good-for-Nothings".Ben Bramble - 2015 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 18 (5):1071-1081.
    According to welfarism about value, something is good simpliciter just in case it is good for some being or beings. In her recent Presidential Address to the American Philosophical Association, “Good-For-Nothings”, Susan Wolf argues against welfarism by appeal to great works of art, literature, music, and philosophy. Wolf provides three main arguments against this view, which I call The Superfluity Argument, The Explanation of Benefit Argument, and The Welfarist’s Mistake. In this paper, I reconstruct these arguments and explain where, in (...)
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  22. WEISINGER, Tragedy and the Paradox of the Fortunate Fall. [REVIEW]S. G. F. Brandon - 1952 - Hibbert Journal 51:407.
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  23. Rethinking Decoration: Pleasure and Ideology in the Visual Arts.David Brett - 2005 - Cambridge University Press.
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  24. Pleasure and the Arts: Enjoying Literature, Painting, and Music.Christopher Butler - 2004 - Oxford University Press.
    How do the arts give us pleasure? Covering a very wide range of artistic works, from Auden to David Lynch, Rembrandt to Edward Weston, and Richard Strauss to Keith Jarrett, Pleasure and the Arts offers us an explanation of our enjoyable emotional engagements with literature, music, and painting. The arts direct us to intimate and particularized relationships, with the people represented in the works, or with those we imagine produced them. When we listen to music, look at a purely abstract (...)
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  25. Feminist Pleasure and Feminine Beautification.Ann J. Cahill - 2003 - Hypatia 18 (4):42-64.
    : This paper explores the conditions under which feminine beautification constitutes a feminist practice. Distinguishing between the process and product of beautification allows us to isolate those aesthetic, inter-subjective, and embodied elements that empower rather than disempower women. The empowering characteristics of beautification, however, are difficult and perhaps impossible to represent in a sexist context; therefore, while beautifying may be a positive experience for women, being viewed as a beautified object in current Western society is almost always opposed to women's (...)
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  26. "The Forger's Art: Forgery and the Philosophy of Art": Edited by Denis Dutton. [REVIEW]David Carrier - 1984 - British Journal of Aesthetics 24 (4):371.
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  27. Ownerless Emotions in Rasa-Aesthetics.Arindam Chakrabarti - 2011 - In Ken-Ichi Sasaki (ed.), Asian Aesthetics. National Univeristy of Singapore Press.
  28. Mary Mothersill on Aesthetic Pleasure.William Charlton - 1988 - Analysis 48 (1):40 - 44.
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  29. Piękno I Ewolucja [Denis Dutton, The Art Instinct, Bloomsbury Press, New York 2009, Ss. 278].Adam Chmielewski - 2009 - Studia Philosophica Wratislaviensia:180-184.
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  30. On The Ambiguous Status of Pleasure in Bentham's Theory of Fictions.Jean-Pierre Cléro - 2014 - Utilitas 26 (4):346-366.
    If pleasure is more open than pain to a double definition, first as a real sensation, second as a more indirect impression, it is clear that the calculus cannot be identical for pleasure and pain alike. Sensations may be combined in the infinitesimal calculus in a substantive way, but this is impossible for the more indirect reflective impressions, which require other sorts of mathematics. For Bentham, it is not a question of eschewing calculation, but of facilitating it, perhaps through a (...)
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  31. Is Aesthetic Pleasure a Myth?Francis J. Coleman - 1971 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 29 (3):319-332.
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  32. Erotic Pathos, Rhetorical Pleasure. Narrative Technique and Mimesis in Eumathios Makrembolites' Hysmine & Hysminias. [REVIEW]Fabrizio Conca - 2003 - Byzantinische Zeitschrift 95 (2):708-710.
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  33. I. NILSSON, Erotic Pathos, Rhetorical Pleasure. Narrative Technique and Mimesis in Eumathios Makrembolites' Hysmine & Hysminias.Fabrizio Conca - 2003 - Byzantinische Zeitschrift 95 (2).
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  34. Aesthetics, Pleasure and Value.Steven Connor - 1992 - In Stephen Regan (ed.), The Politics of Pleasure: Aesthetics and Cultural Theory. Open University Press. pp. 203--20.
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  35. Commentary: Aesthetic Pleasure Versus Aesthetic Interest: The Two Routes to Aesthetic Liking.Consoli Gianluca - 2017 - Frontiers in Psychology 8.
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  36. Samvega, ‘Aesthetic Shock’.Ananda K. Coomaraswamy - 1943 - Harvard Journal of Asiatic Studies 7 (3):174-179.
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  37. Complex Pleasure: Forms of Feeling in German Literature.Stanley Corngold - 1998 - Stanford University Press.
    Complex Pleasure deals with questions of literary feeling in eight major German writers—Lessing, Kant, Hölderlin, Nietzsche, Musil, Kafka, Trakl, and Benjamin. On the basis of close readings of these authors Stanley Corngold makes vivid the following ideas: that where there is literature there is complex pleasure; that this pleasure is complex because it involves the impression of a disclosure; that this thought is foremost in the minds of a number of canonical writers; that important literary works in the German tradition—fiction, (...)
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  38. The Pleasures of Tragedy.E. M. Dadlez - 2013 - In James A. Harris (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of British Philosophy in the Eighteenth Century. Oxford University Press. pp. 450.
    There is a resurgence of Aristotelian concerns in philosophical approaches to tragedy in the eighteenth century. The philosophical literature of the period is rife with proposed solutions to the problem of the delightfulness of imitations of undelightful things and to the more specific problem of tragic pleasure. The latter include attempts to identify different objects of our pleasure and uneasiness as well as distinct attempts to explain how it is that pleasure can depend on such uneasiness. These areas of concern (...)
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  39. Pleased and Afflicted: Hume on the Paradox of Tragic Pleasure.Eva M. Dadlez - 2004 - Hume Studies 30 (2):213-236.
  40. The Gay Science.E. S. Dallas - 1969 - Johnson Reprint Corporation.
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  41. Instinct Et Servitude.Félix Le Dantec - 1903 - Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 55:233 - 251.
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  42. The Pleasures of Aesthetics. [REVIEW]Eric Dayton - 1999 - Dialogue 38 (1):214-214.
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  43. The Pleasures of Aesthetics: Philosophical Essays Jerrold Levinson Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1996, Xiv + 312 Pp. [REVIEW]Eric Dayton - 1999 - Dialogue 38 (1):214-.
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  44. Beauty.Rafael De Clercq - 2013 - In Berys Gaut Gaut & Dominic Lopes (eds.), Routledge Companion to Aesthetics 3rd Edition. Routledge.
    This survey chapter focuses on two questions concerning the nature of beauty. First, can “beauty” be defined, and if so, how? Second, what is the relation between beauty and the mind; for example, between being beautiful and being judged beautiful, or between being beautiful and being the object of pleasure?
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  45. Eva Schaper (1924–1992).T. J. Diffey - 1993 - British Journal of Aesthetics 33 (1):1-4.
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  46. Review of Pleasure, Preference, and Value: Studies in Philosophical Aesthetics. [REVIEW]T. J. Diffley - 1984 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 43 (1):96-98.
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  47. Chimera, Spandrel, or Adaptation.Ellen Dissanayake - 1995 - Human Nature 6 (2):99-117.
    In every known human society, some kind—usually many kinds—of art is practiced, frequently with much vigor and pleasure, so that one could at least hypothesize that “artifying” or “artification” is a characteristic behavior of our species. Yet human ethologists and sociobiologists have been conspicuously unforthcoming about this observably widespread and valued practice, for a number of stated and unstated reasons. The present essay is a position paper that offers an overview and analysis of conceptual issues and problems inherent in viewing (...)
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  48. Pleasure, Preference and Value: Studies in Philosophical Aesthetics.Terence Dolan - 1987 - National University of Ireland.
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  49. The Where and Why of Beauty's Pleasure.Francis P. Donnelly - 1930 - Thought: Fordham University Quarterly 5 (2):261-271.
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  50. The Nature of Aesthetic Experiences.Fabian Dorsch - 2000 - Dissertation, University College London
    This dissertation provides a theory of the nature of aesthetic experiences on the basis of a theory of aesthetic values. It results in the formulation of the following necessary conditions for an experience to be aesthetic: it must consist of a representation of an object and an accompanying feeling; the representation must instantiate an intrinsic value; and the feeling must be the recognition of that value and bestow it on the object. Since representations are of intrinsic value for different reasons, (...)
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