Aesthetic Qualities, Misc

Edited by Robert R. Clewis (Gwynedd Mercy University, Ludwig Maximilians Universität, München)
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  1. Aesthetic Properties.Rafael de Clercq - manuscript
    Paradigmatic aesthetic properties include beauty, elegance, gracefulness, harmony, balance, loveliness, prettiness, handsomeness, and unity, as well as their negative counterparts, for example, ugliness, clumsiness and disunity. The book investigates the nature, reality, and structure(s) of these properties. It also focuses on special cases such as rightness of architectural proportion, musical beauty, functional beauty, and the aesthetic properties that are responsible for our interest in ‘painful art’ (horror and tragedy). [Manuscript is currently undergoing revision.].
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  2. Really Boring Art.Andreas Elpidorou & John Gibson - forthcoming - Ergo: An Open Access Journal of Philosophy.
    There is little question as to whether there is good boring art, though its existence raises a number of questions for both the philosophy of art and the philosophy of emotions. How can boredom ever be a desideratum of art? How can our standing commitments concerning the nature of aesthetic experience and artistic value accommodate the existence of boring art? How can being bored constitute an appropriate mode of engagement with a work of art as a work of art? More (...)
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  3. Jokes and Their Relation to Social Reality.Anton C. Zijderveld - forthcoming - Social Research.
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  4. Can Food Be Art in Virtue of Its Savour Alone?Mohan Matthen - 2021 - Critica 53 (157).
    Food has savour: a collection of properties (including appearance, aroma, mouth-feel) connected with the pleasure (or displeasure) of eating. After explaining this concept, and outlining a theory of aesthetic pleasure, I argue that, like paradigm examples of art, savour can be assessed relative to a culturally determined set of norms. Also like paradigm examples of art, the assessment of savour has no objective basis in the absence of such cultural norms. My argument in this paper is part of a larger (...)
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  5. Originalism and Anti-Originalism: Style and Authenticity in Aesthetic Appreciation.Lisa Giombini - 2020 - Debates in Aesthetics 15 (1):52-73.
    Since the mid-Sixties, philosophers have debated over the aesthetic relevance of authentic art-objects, perfect replicas, and restoration. In particular, a dispute has ensued concerning the cogency of our penchant for original artworks. Originalists argue that authenticity, the quality of an object being of undisputed origin or authorship, is a necessary condition for aesthetic experience, since the appreciation of an artwork presupposes its correct identification. Anti-originalists retort that we have no art-relevant reason to favour originals over visually-indistinguishable duplicates. To this extent, (...)
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  6. Aesthetic Properties: Context Dependent and Perceptual.Kendall L. Walton - 2020 - Wiley: The Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 78 (1).
    The Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism, Volume 78, Issue 1, Page 79-84, Winter 2020.
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  7. Nietzsche (as) Educator.Babette Babich - 2019 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 51 (9):871-885.
  8. The Sublime Reader.Robert R. Clewis (ed.) - 2019 - London: Bloomsbury.
    The first English-language anthology to provide a compendium of primary source material on the sublime. The book takes a chronological approach, covering the earliest ancient traditions up through the early and late modern periods and into contemporary theory. It takes an inclusive, interdisciplinary approach to this key concept in aesthetics and criticism, representing voices and traditions that have often been overlooked. As such, it will be of use and interest across the humanities and allied disciplines.
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  9. Beauty. New Essays in Aesthetics and the Philosophy of Art.Wolfgang Huemer & Íngrid Vendrell Ferran (eds.) - 2019 - München, Deutschland: Philosophia.
    The notion of beauty has been and continues to be one of the main concerns of aesthetics and art theory. Traditionally, the centrality of beauty in the experience of art was widely accepted and beauty was considered one of the key values in aesthetics. In recent debate, however, the significance of the notion of beauty has been discussed controversially. Especially in the second half of the twentieth century, the role of beauty was strongly challenged both by artists and in philosophy (...)
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  10. New Television: The Aesthetics and Politics of a Genre.Martin Shuster - 2019 - University of Chicago Press.
    Even though it’s frequently asserted that we are living in a golden age of scripted television, television as a medium is still not taken seriously as an artistic art form, nor has the stigma of television as “chewing gum for the mind” really disappeared. -/- Philosopher Martin Shuster argues that television is the modern art form, full of promise and urgency, and in New Television, he offers a strong philosophical justification for its importance. Through careful analysis of shows including The (...)
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  11. On "Aesthetics as Philosophy of Perception".Nicholas Silins - 2019 - Studi di Estetica:227-233.
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  12. Introduction: The Place of Beauty in Contemporary Aesthetics.Ingrid Vendrell Ferran & Wolfgang Huemer - 2019 - In Wolfgang Huemer & Íngrid Vendrell Ferran (eds.), Beauty. New Essays in Aesthetics and the Philosophy of Art. München, Deutschland:
    The notion of beauty has endured a troublesome history over the last few decades. While for centuries beauty has been considered one of the central values of art, there have also been times when it seemed old-fashioned to even mention the term. The present volume aims to explore the nature of beauty and to shed light its place in contemporary philosphy and art practice.
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  13. What is the Uncanny?Mark Windsor - 2019 - British Journal of Aesthetics 59 (1):51-65.
    I propose a definition of the uncanny: an anxious uncertainty about what is real caused by an apparent impossibility. First, I outline the relevance of the uncanny to art and aesthetics. Second, I disambiguate theoretical uses of ‘uncanny’ and establish the sense of the term that I am interested in—namely, an emotional state directed towards particular objects in the world which are characteristically eerie, creepy, and weird. Third, I look at Edgar Allan Poe’s ‘The Fall of the House of Usher’ (...)
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  14. ‘Nothing but Nonsense’: A Kantian Account of Ugliness.Matthew Coate - 2018 - British Journal of Aesthetics 58 (1):51-70.
    © British Society of Aesthetics 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society of Aesthetics. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.comWhat does it mean for a thing to be ugly, or perhaps better, for something to be judged as such? We should admit that the matter is not transparent. Maybe that seems odd, since we find things ugly all the time; should not this be plain as day, then? But usually, it is what seems (...)
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  15. Pleasure and Transcendence: Two Paradoxes of Sublimity.Tom Hanauer - 2018 - In Lars Aagaard-Mogensen (ed.), The Possibility of the Sublime: Aesthetic Exchanges. Newcastle, UK: Cambridge Scholars Publishing. pp. 29-44.
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  16. Do Gestalt Effects Show That We Perceive High-Level Aesthetic Properties?Raamy Majeed - 2018 - Analysis 78 (3):440-450.
    Whether we perceive high-level properties is presently a source of controversy. A promising test case for whether we do is aesthetic perception. Aesthetic properties are distinct from low-level properties, like shape and colour. Moreover, some of them, e.g. being serene and being handsome, are properties we appear to perceive. Aesthetic perception also shares a similarity with gestalt effects, e.g. seeing-as, in that aesthetic properties, like gestalt phenomena, appear to ‘emerge’ from low-level properties. Gestalts effects, of course, are widely observed, which (...)
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  17. Review of Patina: A Profane Archaeology, by Shannon Lee Dawdy. [REVIEW]Erich Hatala Matthes - 2018 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 76 (2):249-252.
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  18. Contemporary Kitsch: The Death of Pseudo-Art and the Birth of Everyday Cheesiness (A Postcolonial Inquiry).Max Ryynänen - 2018 - Terra Aestheticae: Journal of Russian Society for Aesthetics 1 (1):70-86.
    The discourse on kitsch has changed tone. The concept, which in the early 20th century referred more to pretentious pseudo-art than to cute everyday objects, was attacked between the World Wars by theorists of modernity (e.g. Greenberg on Repin). The late 20th century scholars gazed at it with critical curiosity (Eco, Kulka, Calinescu). What we now have is a profound interest in and acceptance of cute mass-produced objects. It has become marginal to use the concept to criticize pseudo-art. Scholars who (...)
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  19. Josef Albers, "So ist Kunst ... Erlebnis", Weimarer Verlagsgesellschaft: Wiesbaden 2018.Martina Sauer - 2018 - Wiesbaden, Germany: Weimarer Verlagsgesellschaft.
    This is the first coherent monography about the life and work of the important Bauhaus master Josef Albers. It aims to discover Albers as a teacher and an artist anew. Thus, 40 years after his death an artist shall be honored, who has had till now not enough attention within the Bauhaus masters. It fall too short to introduce him solely as the teacher and idea provider of the basic course at the Bauhaus. After his emigration to the US he (...)
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  20. Aesthetic Properties, History and Perception.Sonia Sedivy - 2018 - British Journal of Aesthetics 58 (4):345-362.
    If artworks and their aesthetic properties stand in constitutive relationships to historical context and circumstances, so that some understanding of relevant facts is involved in responding to a work, what becomes of the intuitive view that we see artworks and at least some of their aesthetic properties? This question is raised by arguments in both aesthetics and art history for the historical nature of works of art. The paper argues that the answer needs to take philosophy of perception into account. (...)
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  21. Independência: libertação da arte na dimensão estética de Herbert Marcuse.Jair Soares - 2018 - Revista Diaphonía.
    Abstract: According to Marcuse, esthetics is an essential component to the process of freedom of consciousness and behavior of individuals. It is, in Hegelian language, to free the absolute spirit. In this sense, art configures itself as fantasy, which makes the “apparent” reveal the essence of things. Essence here is understood not as a metaphysical field, but as an unveiling of questions, within a false truth of the (establishment), in the totality of relationships. In dialectical terms, art manifests itself in (...)
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  22. Vergegenwärtigung von Erfahrungen, Perspektivenübernahme und Empathie.Íngrid Vendrell-Ferran - 2018 - In Susanne Schmetkamp & Magdalena Zorn (eds.), Variationen des Mitfühlens. Empathie in Musik, Literatur, Film und Sprache. Mainz, Stuttgart: Franz Steiner Verlag.
    Der Aufsatz ist in zwei Teile gegliedert. Im ersten Teil unterscheide ich das Phänomen der Empathie von ähnlichen Phänomenen. Im zweiten Teil werde ich auf die Bedingungen für Empathie eingehen. In diesem Teil geht es mir darum zu zeigen, dass wir es trotz einiger Unterschiede zwischen Empathie für Mitmenschen und Empathie für Figuren mit demselben Phänomen zu tun haben.
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  23. Beauty (English Version).John Zeimbekis - 2018 - In J. Deonna E. Tieffenbach (ed.), Petit traité des valeurs. Editions de l'Ithaque.
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  24. A Kantian Analytic of the Ugly.Christopher Buckman - 2017 - International Philosophical Quarterly 57 (4):365-380.
    Kant’s theory of taste, as expounded in the Critique of Judgment, deals exhaustively with judgments of beauty. Rarely does Kant mention ugliness. This omission has led to a debate among commentators about how judgments of ugliness should be explained in a Kantian framework. I argue that the judgment of ugliness originates in the disharmonious play between the faculties of imagination and understanding. Such disharmony occurs when the understanding finds that it cannot in principle form any concept suitable to a representation (...)
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  25. WHAT IS ART (Classificatory Disputes, Aesthetic Judgements, Contemporary Art.Ulrich De Balbian - 2017 - Philosophy and Art.
    WHAT is art? Classificatory disputes.. Classificatory disputes about what is art SEE this link for the images embeded in the text!! https://ulrichdebalbian.wordpress.com/2015/05/09/classificatory-disputes-about-what-is-art/ -/- Art historians and philosophers of art have long had classificatory disputes about art regarding whether a particular cultural form or piece of work should be classified as art. Disputes about what does and does not count as art continue to occur today -/- Defining art is difficult if not impossible. Aestheticians and art philosophers often engage in disputes (...)
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  26. Restorative Aesthetic Pleasures and the Restoration of Pleasure.Ryan Paul Doran - 2017 - Australasian Philosophical Review 1 (1):73-78.
    ABSTRACT: I argue, contra Mohan Matthen, that at least some aesthetic pleasures arising from the appreciation of aesthetic features of artworks are what he calls ‘r-pleasures’ as opposed to ‘f-pleasures’—and moreover, that the paradigm aesthetic pleasure appears to be an r-pleasure on Matthen's terms. I then argue that talk of r- and f-pleasures does not distinguish different kinds, but two different features of pleasure; so this supposed distinction cannot be used to characterize a sui generis aesthetic pleasure.
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  27. The Virtue of Subtlety and the Vice of a Heavy Hand.Alex King - 2017 - British Journal of Aesthetics 57 (2):119-137.
    Subtlety is a concept as deeply intertwined with aesthetic judgements as virtually any other. But it is not clear what makes subtlety a good property of an artwork, or indeed if it is one. In this paper, I explore this under-discussed issue. First, I spend some time setting out hallmarks of subtlety and discussing different ways in which subtlety might be valuable. I then go on to defend a particular view about why subtlety is aesthetically valuable, by thinking through why (...)
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  28. Naturästhetik in der Planungsethik.Gesine Schepers - 2017 - In Karsten Berr (ed.), Architektur- und Planungsethik. Zugänge, Perspektiven, Standpunkte. RaumFragen: Stadt – Region – Landschaft. Wiesbaden: Springer. pp. 195-203.
  29. Aesthetic Properties as Powers.Vid Simoniti - 2017 - European Journal of Philosophy 25 (4):1434-1453.
    Realist positions about aesthetic properties are few and far between, though sometimes developed by analogy to realism about secondary properties such as colours. By contrast, I advance a novel realist position about aesthetic properties, which is based on a disanalogy between aesthetic properties and colours. Whereas colours are usually perceived as relatively steady features of external objects, aesthetic properties are perceived as unsteady properties: as powers that objects have to cause a certain experience in the observer. Following on from this (...)
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  30. Some Ways to Speculative Aesthetics.Tom Sparrow - 2017 - Philosophy Today 61 (3):523-38.
    Continental philosophy is witnessing a global renaissance of speculative philosophy. And while some corners of this movement are gaining traction in art- and architecture-theoretical circles, its application to philosophical aesthetics has been forestalled in favor of metaphysical and, secondarily, epistemological inquiry. This essay tracks some of the ways that speculative aesthetics is emerging, and opening new pathways, within the renaissance. It accomplishes three primary tasks. First, it enumerates several of the ways that the name “speculative aesthetics” has been mobilized in (...)
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  31. Vanquishing Temporal Distance: Malraux, Art and Metamorphosis.Derek Allan - 2016 - Australian Journal of French Studies 53 (1-2):136-148.
    How does art – literature, visual art, or music – endure over time? What special power does it possess that enables it to “transcend” time – to overcome temporal distance and speak to us not just as evidence of times gone by, but as a living presence? The Renaissance, which discovered this transcendent power of art in the classical sculpture and literature it admired so strongly, concluded that great art is impervious to time – “timeless”, “immortal”, “eternal” – a belief (...)
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  32. Plato and the Spectacle of Laughter.Michael Naas - 2016 - Angelaki 21 (3):13-26.
    This essay examines the critical role played by comedy and laughter in Plato. It begins by taking seriously Plato's critique of comedy and his concerns about the negative effects of laughter in dialogues such as Republic and Laws. It then shows how Plato, rather than simply rejecting comedy and censuring laughter, attempts to put these into the service of philosophy by rethinking them in philosophical terms. Accordingly, the laughable or the ridiculous is understood not just in relation to the ugly (...)
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  33. Aesthetic Quality: A Darwinian View. Perricone - 2016 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 50 (2):45-56.
    Je sais que la poesie est indepensable, mais je ne sais pas a quoi. [I know poetry is indispensable, but I don’t know what for.]A crucial characteristic of any aesthetic education is to understand the nature of aesthetic quality, that is, how to determine whether one artwork is superior to another. For example, I want to say that J. S. Bach’s Sixth Suite for Unaccompanied Cello performed by YoYo Ma is superior to “Thriller,” composed by Rod Temperton and performed by (...)
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  34. Abstrakt - Affektiv - Multimodal. Zur Verarbeitung von Bewegtbildern Im Anschluss an Cassirer, Langer Und Krois.Martina Sauer - 2016 - In Lars Christian Grabbe, Patrick Rupert-Kruse & Norbert M. Schmitz (eds.), Bildkörper. Zum Verhältnis von Bildtechnologien und Embodiment. Kiel, Germany: Büchner-Verlag. pp. 46-71.
    Is it true that there is an analogy between modes of creation and such of perception? Respective to the cultural anthropological research of Ernst Cassirer, Susanne K. Langer and John M. Krois and by the analysis of a tape of the Swiss video-artist Pipilotti Rist this initial thesis of Formal Aesthetics shall be supported. - I - -/- Lässt sich die Behauptung stützen, dass zwischen Gestaltungsweisen und Wahrnehmungsweisen eine Analogie besteht? Aufbauend auf den kulturanthropologischen Forschungen von Ernst Cassirer, Susanne K. (...)
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  35. Aesthetic Experience of Beautiful and Ugly Persons: A Critique.Mika Suojanen - 2016 - Journal of Aesthetics and Culture 8 (1).
    The question of whether or not beauty exists in nature is a philosophical problem. In particular, there is the question of whether artworks, persons, or nature has aesthetic qualities. Most people say that they care about their own beauty. Moreover, they judge another person's appearance from an aesthetic point of view using aesthetic concepts. However, aesthetic judgements are not objective in the sense that the experience justifies their objectivity. By analysing Monroe C. Beardsley's theory of the objectivity of aesthetic qualities, (...)
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  36. A Kantian Hybrid Theory of Art Criticism: A Particularist Appeal to the Generalists.Emine Hande Tuna - 2016 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 74 (4):397-411.
    Noël Carroll proposes a generalist theory of art criticism, which essentially involves evaluations of artworks on the basis of their success value, at the cost of rendering evaluations of reception value irrelevant to criticism. In this article, I argue for a hybrid account of art criticism, which incorporates Carroll's objective model but puts Carroll-type evaluations in the service of evaluations of reception value. I argue that this hybrid model is supported by Kant's theory of taste. Hence, I not only present (...)
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  37. Go Bleep Yourself!: Why Censorship is Funny.Robert T. Valgenti - 2016 - Angelaki 21 (3):103-114.
    This essay argues that the use of the censor's bleep for comedic effect in cases when an actual expletive is not present can contribute not only to our understanding of traditional theories of humor but also uncover a deep connection between censorship, humor, and human speech. The essay begins with a description of the phenomenon of “unnecessary censorship” within the context of prime-time television and the growing use of profane and indecent language. To understand why unnecessary censorship works as a (...)
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  38. Aesthetics of the Sublime and Moral Education.Youngdon Youn - 2016 - Journal of Ethics: The Korean Association of Ethics 1 (108):31-49.
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  39. Einführung in die philosophische Ästhetik.Maria Elisabeth Reicher - 2015 - Darmstadt: Wissenschaftliche Buchgesellschaft.
    Dieses Buch ist eine bewusst systematisch orientierte Einführung in die grundlegendsten Fragen der philosophischen Ästhetik. Es richtet sich in erster Linie an Studierende der Philosophie, aber auch an interessierte Laien und Vertreter/innen anderer Disziplinen. Zusammenfassungen, Übungsaufgaben und Literaturhinweise am Ende jedes Kapitels machen es auch für das Selbststudium geeignet. Aus dem Inhalt: I. Was ist philosophische Ästhetik? – Auf der Suche nach einer Definition der philosophischen Ästhetik – Die Gegenstände der philosophischen Ästhetik – Die Fragen der philosophischen Ästhetik – Die (...)
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  40. 27. Beauty and the Emotions.Guy Sircello - 2015 - In New Theory of Beauty. Princeton University Press. pp. 94-97.
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  41. The Sublime in Art: Kant, the Mannerist, and the Matterist Sublime. Vandenabeele - 2015 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 49 (3):32-49.
    Numerous contemporary artworks are found repellent, even by genuine art lovers, either because they deliberately derange our perception and imagination by an abundance of incoherent representations and stimuli or because they demand that we value seemingly nonsensical objects or all kinds of disgusting materials. Installations, collages, and so-called unassisted ready-mades especially cannot count on too much appreciation, unless the artists in question are sufficiently supported by clever managers who reduce their work to commodities, which then serve merely as illustrations of (...)
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  42. A Portrait of the Artist as an Aesthetic Expert.Christy Mag Uidhir & Cameron Buckner - 2014 - In Gregory Currie, Matthew Kieran & Aaron Meskin (eds.), Aesthetics and the Sciences. Oxford University Press.
    For the most part, the Aesthetic Theory of Art—any theory of art claiming that the aesthetic is a descriptively necessary feature of art—has been repudiated, especially in light of what are now considered traditional counterexamples. We argue that the Aesthetic Theory of Art can instead be far more plausibly recast by abandoning aesthetic-feature possession by the artwork for a claim about aesthetic-concept possession by the artist. This move productively re-frames and re-energizes the debate surrounding the relationship between art and the (...)
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  43. The Boring.Dan Moller - 2014 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 72 (2):181-191.
    This article discusses the aesthetic concept of boringness, of which there has been relatively little philosophical discussion, especially along its objective, nonpsychological dimensions. I begin by confronting skepticism about the validity of judgments about boringness and rebut suggestions to the effect that these judgments are inevitably compromised by mistakes or vices of the audience. The article then develops an account focused on certain kinds of reasonable expectations we form in a given aesthetic context. I go on to confront the question (...)
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  44. Empirical Aesthetics.William Seeley - 2014 - In Michael Kelly (ed.), Encyclopedia of Aesthetics (2 ed.). New York, NY, USA: Oxford University Press.
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  45. The Sublime in Modern Philosophy: Aesthetics, Ethics, and Nature. By Emily Brady. [REVIEW]Michael R. Spicher - 2014 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 88 (3):598-600.
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  46. The Aesthetic Experience of Artwork.Mika Suojanen - 2014 - In Kaisa Koivisto, Jani Kukkola, Timo Latomaa & Pirkko Sandelin (eds.), Experience Research IV. Rovaniemi: Lapland University Press. pp. 57–72.
    What is beautiful or ugly vary from one person another, from time to time and from culture to culture. However, at the same time, people are certain that there are aesthetic properties in the nature, artworks and other persons and, furthermore, they can be perceived by the naked eye. This article argues that experience does not reveal the aesthetic properties of the objects.
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  47. Art and Time.Derek Allan - 2013 - Cambridge Scholars Press.
    A well-known feature of great works of art is their power to “live on” long after the moment of their creation – to remain vital and alive long after the culture in which they were born has passed into history. This power to transcend time is common to works as various as the plays of Shakespeare, the Victory of Samothrace, and many works from early cultures such as Egypt and Buddhist India which we often encounter today in major art museums. (...)
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  48. Listening to Many Voices: Athenian Tragedy as Popular Art.William Allan & Adrian Kelly - 2013 - In Anna Marmodoro & Jonathan Hill (eds.), The Author's Voice in Classical and Late Antiquity. Oxford University Press. pp. 77.
    By analysing how the audience interpreted the many voices of tragic performance, this chapter suggests a new model for understanding tragedy’s relationship to the world of the watching community. Although the idea that the poet expresses his personal opinions through the chorus or his characters is now rightly seen as old-fashioned and naïve, it is still legitimate to ask how the poet uses his heroic characters and their voices to speak to his contemporary audience—using ‘speak to’ in the broadest sense, (...)
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  49. 9/11 as Schmaltz-Attractor: A Coda on the Significance of Kitsch.C. E. Emmer - 2013 - In Monica Kjellman-Chapin (ed.), Kitsch: History, Theory, Practice. Cambridge Scholars Press. pp. 184-224.
    "The concluding chapter, penned by C. E. Emmer, both revisits and greatly expands upon disputations within the contested territory of kitsch as term and tool in cultural turf-war arsenals. Focusing on debates surrounding two visual responses to the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001, Dennis Madalone's 2003 music video for the patriotic anthem 'America We Stand As One' and Jenny Ryan's 'plushie' sculpture, 'Soft 9/11,' Emmer utilizes these debates to reveal the coexisting and competing attitudes towards ostensibly kitschy objects and (...)
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  50. The Sublime : Process and Mediation.Liza McCosh - 2013 - In Estelle Barrett & Barbara Bolt (eds.), Carnal Knowledge: Towards a 'New Materialism' Through the Arts. I.B. Tauris.
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