Aesthetic Qualities, Misc

Edited by Robert R. Clewis (Gwynedd Mercy College, Ludwig Maximilians Universität, München)
Related categories
Siblings:

124 found
Order:
1 — 50 / 124
  1. Vanquishing Temporal Distance: Malraux, Art and Metamorphosis.Derek Allan - 2016 - Australian Journal of French Studies 53 (1-2):136-148.
    How does art – literature, visual art, or music – endure over time? What special power does it possess that enables it to “transcend” time – to overcome temporal distance and speak to us not just as evidence of times gone by, but as a living presence? The Renaissance, which discovered this transcendent power of art in the classical sculpture and literature it admired so strongly, concluded that great art is impervious to time – “timeless”, “immortal”, “eternal” – a belief (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2. Art and Time.Derek Allan - 2013 - Cambridge Scholars Press.
    A well-known feature of great works of art is their power to “live on” long after the moment of their creation – to remain vital and alive long after the culture in which they were born has passed into history. This power to transcend time is common to works as various as the plays of Shakespeare, the Victory of Samothrace, and many works from early cultures such as Egypt and Buddhist India which we often encounter today in major art museums. (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3. Listening to Many Voices: Athenian Tragedy as Popular Art.William Allan & Adrian Kelly - 2013 - In Anna Marmodoro & Jonathan Hill (eds.), The Author's Voice in Classical and Late Antiquity. Oxford University Press. pp. 77.
    By analysing how the audience interpreted the many voices of tragic performance, this chapter suggests a new model for understanding tragedy’s relationship to the world of the watching community. Although the idea that the poet expresses his personal opinions through the chorus or his characters is now rightly seen as old-fashioned and naïve, it is still legitimate to ask how the poet uses his heroic characters and their voices to speak to his contemporary audience—using ‘speak to’ in the broadest sense, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4. The Holes of Henry Moore: On the Function of Space in Sculpture.Rudolf Arnheim - 1948 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 7 (1):29-38.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  5. Originality and Value.Christopher Bartel - 2010 - Hermenia:66-77.
    What does it mean to describe a work of art as being ‘original’? Frank Sibley believed that works of art are not valued for their originality independently of their aesthetic value. He argued that a work may be described as being ‘original’ if it is innovative and also exhibits some further aesthetic value. In this essay, I argue against this conjunctive account of originality as some kind of innovation-plus-value. I claim that a work may be valued for and described as (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6. The Kantian Sublime and the Revelation of Freedom by Clewis, Robert.Stefan Bird-Pollan - 2011 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 69 (3):348-350.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7. Wine Active Compounds 2008: Proceedings of the WAC2008 International Conference.David Chassange (ed.) - 2008 - Oenapluria Media.
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8. A Note on the Aesthetics of Mirror Reversal.Rafael Clercq - 2007 - Philosophical Studies 132 (3):553 - 563.
    According to Roy Sorensen [Philosophical Studies 100 (2000) 175–191] an object cannot differ aesthetically from its mirror image. On his view, mirror-reversing an object – changing its left/right orientation – cannot bring about any aesthetic change. However, in arguing for this thesis Sorensen assumes that aesthetic properties supervene on intrinsic properties alone. This is a highly controversial assumption and nothing is offered in its support. Moreover, a plausible weakening of the assumption does not improve the argument. Finally, Sorensen’s second argument (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  9. Greenberg, Kant, and Aesthetic Judgments of Modernist Art.Robert R. Clewis - 2008 - AE: Canadian Aesthetics Journal 18.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10. ‘Nothing but Nonsense’: A Kantian Account of Ugliness.Matthew Coate - 2018 - British Journal of Aesthetics 58 (1):51-70.
    © British Society of Aesthetics 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society of Aesthetics. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.comWhat does it mean for a thing to be ugly, or perhaps better, for something to be judged as such? We should admit that the matter is not transparent. Maybe that seems odd, since we find things ugly all the time; should not this be plain as day, then? But usually, it is what seems (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11. WHAT IS ART (Classificatory Disputes, Aesthetic Judgements, Contemporary Art.Ulrich De Balbian - 2017 - Philosophy and Art.
    WHAT is art? Classificatory disputes.. Classificatory disputes about what is art SEE this link for the images embeded in the text!! https://ulrichdebalbian.wordpress.com/2015/05/09/classificatory-disputes-about-what-is-art/ -/- Art historians and philosophers of art have long had classificatory disputes about art regarding whether a particular cultural form or piece of work should be classified as art. Disputes about what does and does not count as art continue to occur today -/- Defining art is difficult if not impossible. Aestheticians and art philosophers often engage in disputes (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12. Aesthetic Properties.Rafael de Clercq - manuscript
    Paradigmatic aesthetic properties include beauty, elegance, gracefulness, harmony, balance, loveliness, prettiness, handsomeness, and unity, as well as their negative counterparts, for example, ugliness, clumsiness and disunity. The book investigates the nature, reality, and structure(s) of these properties. It also focuses on special cases such as rightness of architectural proportion, musical beauty, functional beauty, and the aesthetic properties that are responsible for our interest in ‘painful art’ (horror and tragedy). [Manuscript is currently undergoing revision.].
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13. Modern Architecture and the Concept of Harmony.Rafael de Clercq - 2011 - British Journal of Aesthetics 51 (1):69-79.
    The aim of this paper is to achieve a better understanding of why modern buildings do not easily harmonize with one another. After proposing, and defending, an analysis of the concept of architectural harmony, the paper turns to three possible views on whether we can expect more harmony from modern architecture in the future.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14. Scruton on Rightness of Proportion in Architecture.Rafael De Clercq - 2009 - British Journal of Aesthetics 49 (4):405-414.
    In The Aesthetics of Architecture, Roger Scruton makes at least four claims about rightness of architectural proportion. The present paper lists those claims, briefly discusses the way they are related, and, finally, selects one as the topic of discussion: the claim that there cannot be an exact, mathematical definition of rightness of proportion. Scruton’s arguments for this claim are reviewed. The first is found to be substantially correct, whereas the second is found to rely on a mistaken assumption, namely the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15. The Structure of Aesthetic Properties.Rafael De Clercq - 2008 - Philosophy Compass 3 (5):894-909.
    Aesthetic properties are often thought to have either no evaluative component or an evaluative component that can be isolated from their descriptive component. The present article argues that this popular view is without adequate support. First, doubt is cast on the idea that some paradigmatic aesthetic properties are purely descriptive. Second, the idea that the evaluative component of an aesthetic property can always be neatly separated from its descriptive component is called into question. Meanwhile, a speculative hypothesis is launched regarding (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  16. The Concept of an Aesthetic Property.Rafael De Clercq - 2002 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 60 (2):167–176.
    This paper provides an analysis of the concept of an aesthetic property in non-aesthetic terms.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  17. The Nature of Aesthetic Experiences.Fabian Dorsch - 2000 - Dissertation, University College London
    This dissertation provides a theory of the nature of aesthetic experiences on the basis of a theory of aesthetic values. It results in the formulation of the following necessary conditions for an experience to be aesthetic: it must consist of a representation of an object and an accompanying feeling; the representation must instantiate an intrinsic value; and the feeling must be the recognition of that value and bestow it on the object. Since representations are of intrinsic value for different reasons, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18. 9/11 as Schmaltz-Attractor: A Coda on the Significance of Kitsch.C. E. Emmer - 2013 - In Monica Kjellman-Chapin (ed.), Kitsch: History, Theory, Practice. Cambridge Scholars Press. pp. 184-224.
    "The concluding chapter, penned by C. E. Emmer, both revisits and greatly expands upon disputations within the contested territory of kitsch as term and tool in cultural turf-war arsenals. Focusing on debates surrounding two visual responses to the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001, Dennis Madalone's 2003 music video for the patriotic anthem 'America We Stand As One' and Jenny Ryan's 'plushie' sculpture, 'Soft 9/11,' Emmer utilizes these debates to reveal the coexisting and competing attitudes towards ostensibly kitschy objects and (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19. The Flower and the Breaking Wheel: Burkean Beauty and Political Kitsch.C. E. Emmer - 2007 - International Journal of the Arts in Society 2 (1):153-164.
    What is kitsch? The varieties of phenomena which can fall under the name are bewildering. Here, I focus on what has been called “traditional kitsch,” and argue that it often turns on the emotional effect specifically captured by Edmund Burke’s concept of “beauty” from his 1757 'A Philosophical Enquiry into the Sublime and Beautiful.' Burkean beauty also serves to distinguish “traditional kitsch” from other phenomena also often called “kitsch”—namely, entertainment. Although I argue that Burkean beauty in domestic decoration allows for (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20. Aesthetic Qualities and Aesthetic Value.Alan H. Goldman - 1990 - Journal of Philosophy 87 (1):23-37.
    To say that an object is beautiful or ugly is seemingly to refer to a property of the object. But it is also to express a positive or negative response to it, a set of aesthetic values, and to suggest that others ought to respond in the same way. Such judg- ments are descriptive, expressive, and normative or prescriptive at once. These multiple features are captured well by Humean accounts that analyze the judgments as ascribing relational properties. To say that (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   10 citations  
  21. Glamour as an Aesthetic Property of Persons.Carol S. Gould - 2005 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 63 (3):237–247.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22. Drama.James R. Hamilton - 2009 - In Higgins Davies (ed.), Blackwell Companion to Aesthetics.
    Hamilton explains why "drama" is a category of literature rather than of theater, even though it is appropriate to describe many theatrical performances as "dramatic." Consideration of the possibilities of theatrical performance are especially important to this category of literature, but need not be (and often are not) decisive in constraining interpretations of dramatic works.
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23. Pretense and Display Theories of Theatrical Performance.James R. Hamilton - 2009 - Organon F: Medzinárodný Časopis Pre Analytickú Filozofiu (4):632-654.
    A survey of and a comparison of the relative strengths of two favored views of what theatrical performers do: pretend or engage in a variety of self-display. The behavioral version of the pretense theory is shown to be relatively weak as an instrument for understanding the variety of performance styles available in world theater. Whether pretense works as a theory of the mental capacities that underly theatrical performance is a separate question.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24. The Art of Theater.James R. Hamilton - 2007 - Wiley-Blackwell.
    _The Art of Theater_ argues for the recognition of theatrical performance as an art form independent of dramatic writing. Identifies the elements that make a performance a work of art Looks at the competing views of the text-performance relationships An important and original contribution to the aesthetics and philosophy of theater.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  25. Aesthetic Qualities, Value and Emotive Meaning.Göran Hermerén - 1973 - Theoria 39 (1-3):71-100.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  26. Aesthetic Supervenience Revisited.D. H. Hick - 2012 - British Journal of Aesthetics 52 (3):301-316.
    In this paper, I hope to reintroduce debate on the issue of aesthetic supervenience, especially in light of work undertaken by metaphysicians in recent years. After providing a brief walkthrough of some of the major views on supervenience generally, including several important metaphysical distinctions, I build upon views by Jerrold Levinson, John Bender, Nick Zangwill, and Gregory Currie, to develop a realist thesis of strong local supervenience, such that aesthetic properties of artworks and other objects depend upon their formal/structural properties (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27. Kunst Und Erkenntnis (Art and Knowledge).Christoph Jäger & Georg Meggle (eds.) - 2005 - mentis.
    Dient Kunst der Erkenntnis? Vermittelt sie Einsichten oder Wissen? Und wenn ja: auf welche Weise? Sind ästhetische Urteile wahr oder falsch? Beruht unsere Wertschätzung von Kunst auf ihren kognitiven Funktionen? Zu diesen Fragen, die zu den klassischen Themen der Kunstphilosophie gehören, beziehen zehn Philosophen aus dem deutschen Sprachraum in Originalbeiträgen Position. Der Band dokumentiert den gegenwärtigen Stand der Kontroversen zwischen kognitivistischen und nichtkognitivistischen Theorien der Kunst und der Kunstbewertung. Mit Beiträgen von Rüdiger Bittner, Sabine A. Döring, Christoph Jäger, Bernd Kleimann, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28. The Aesthetic Potential of the Element of Earth.Marzenna Jakubczak - 2002 - Analecta Husserliana:253-263.
  29. The Virtue of Subtlety and the Vice of a Heavy Hand.Alex King - 2017 - British Journal of Aesthetics 57 (2):119-137.
    Subtlety is a concept as deeply intertwined with aesthetic judgements as virtually any other. But it is not clear what makes subtlety a good property of an artwork, or indeed if it is one. In this paper, I explore this under-discussed issue. First, I spend some time setting out hallmarks of subtlety and discussing different ways in which subtlety might be valuable. I then go on to defend a particular view about why subtlety is aesthetically valuable, by thinking through why (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30. Aesthetic Aspects and Aesthetic Qualities.Peter Kivy - 1968 - Journal of Philosophy 65 (4):85-93.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31. The Comic, the Tragic, and the Cynical: Some Notes on Their Ethical Dimensions.Israel Knox - 1951 - Ethics 62 (3):210-214.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  32. Geistiges Eigentum und Originalität: Zur Politik der Wissens- und Kulturproduktion.Odin Kroeger, Günther Friesinger, Paul Lohberger & Eberhard Ortland (eds.) - 2011 - Vienna: Turia + Kant.
    Mit der zunehmenden Bedeutung immaterieller Güter nimmt auch die Intensität der Konflikte um »Geistiges Eigentum« zu. Dabei fungiert der Mythos vom Original nach wie vor als Grundlage für Rechtsansprüche auf exklusive Verfügungsrechte. Wer ein Urheberrecht in Anspruch nehmen, eine Erfindung anmelden will, muss behaupten, die betreffenden Formen oder Verfahren seien das Ergebnis seiner originären kreativen Leistung. Aber was ist Originalität? Unter welchen Umständen wird sie wem zugerechnet? Dieser Band bietet Bestandsaufnahmen und Analysen der rechtlichen, politischen, ökonomischen und kulturellen Problemlage und (...)
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33. Everyday Surface Aesthetic Qualities: "Neat," "Messy," "Clean," "Dirty".Thomas Leddy - 1995 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 53 (3):259-268.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  34. Contributing to the Development of Postmodern Critical Theory with Eastern Philosophy.Jae Seong Lee - 2008 - Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 26:69-75.
    This paper concerns broadly with the works of such ethical postmodern theorists as Jacques Derrida, Emmanuel Levinas, Giles Deleuze, focusing on how we can contribute to the development of their ideas by discussing Laozi and Zhuanzi’s Taoism, Buddhism, and modern Korean Neo-Confucianism of Toe-gae Lee. I claim that for criticism and art, literature, film and culture as well as philosophy itself, we are now facing this new need of another notion of subjectivity that not only accepts difference but takes the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35. A Microphenomenology of Aesthetic Qualities.Richard Lind - 1985 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 43 (4):393-403.
    Microphenomenology (the refelctive reconstruction of attentional processes operative in perception) explicates the distinction between aesthetic and nonaesthetic qualities in a way that avoids traditional objections. aesthetic qualities are identified as phenomenal manifestations of a specific sort of spontaneous attentional event. particular aesthetic qualities are show to fall within any of six different categories of features attributable to this event. some aesthetic predicates strictly imply such features while others only 'suggest' them.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  36. The Sublime Action.Alphonso Lingis - 2006 - Problemos 69.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37. Is a Sense of Humour a Virtue?John Lippitt - 2005 - The Monist 88 (1):72-92.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  38. Smiling and Laughter: Different Phyletic Origins?J. S. Lockard, C. E. Fahrenbruch, J. L. Smith & C. J. Morgan - 1977 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 10 (3):183-186.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  39. The Works of Dionysius Longinus, on the Sublime or, a Treatise Concerning the Sovereign Perfection of Writing. Translated From the Greek. With Some Remarks on the English Poets.Samuel Longinus, John Welsted, Owen Briscoe, Graves & Lloyd - 1712 - Printed for Sam. Briscoe, and Sold by John Graves Next Whites-Chocolate-House in St. James's-Street, and Owen Lloyd Near the Church in the Temple.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  40. Musical Works and Performance Evaluation.António Lopes - 2005 - Postgraduate Journal of Aesthetics 2 (2):76-86.
    This paper addresses the following problem: to what extent do ontological considerations about musical works affect our evaluation of performances of those works? I argue for the claim that at least some important grounds on which performances are evaluated are specific to them, in that these grounds are either independent from, or related but not fully determined by, the properties of the works they are of. In the first part of the paper, I explore the relations between good-making features of (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  41. Proverbs, Sententiae, and Exempla in Chaucer's Comic Tales: The Function of Comic MisapplicationArticle Author Querymacdonald D [Google Scholar].Donald Macdonald - 1966 - Speculum 41 (3):453-465.
    Chaucer's comic tales contain, both in the speeches of the characters and in the form of comments by the various narrators, a substantial number of proverbs, sententiae, and exempla. The frequency with which these monitory elements occur, the fact that they appear to be almost entirely Chaucer's original contributions to the tales, and the importance of their function in comic characterization, in narrative structure, and in the control of narrative tone combine to suggest that they were employed by Chaucer with (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  42. A Portrait of the Artist as an Aesthetic Expert.Christy Mag Uidhir & Cameron Buckner - 2014 - In Gregory Currie, Matthew Kieran & Aaron Meskin (eds.), Aesthetics and the Sciences. Oxford University Press.
    For the most part, the Aesthetic Theory of Art—any theory of art claiming that the aesthetic is a descriptively necessary feature of art—has been repudiated, especially in light of what are now considered traditional counterexamples. We argue that the Aesthetic Theory of Art can instead be far more plausibly recast by abandoning aesthetic-feature possession by the artwork for a claim about aesthetic-concept possession by the artist. This move productively re-frames and re-energizes the debate surrounding the relationship between art and the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  43. Do Gestalt Effects Show That We Perceive High-Level Aesthetic Properties?Raamy Majeed - 2018 - Analysis 78 (3):440-450.
    Whether we perceive high-level properties is presently a source of controversy. A promising test case for whether we do is aesthetic perception. Aesthetic properties are distinct from low-level properties, like shape and colour. Moreover, some of them, e.g. being serene and being handsome, are properties we appear to perceive. Aesthetic perception also shares a similarity with gestalt effects, e.g. seeing-as, in that aesthetic properties, like gestalt phenomena, appear to ‘emerge’ from low-level properties. Gestalts effects, of course, are widely observed, which (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  44. Medieval Aesthetics.Joseph Margolis - 2001 - In Berys Nigel Gaut & Dominic Lopes (eds.), The Routledge Companion to Aesthetics. Routledge.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  45. Laughing at Nothing: Humor as a Response to Nihilism.John Marmysz - 2003 - SUNY Press.
    Disputing the common misconception that nihilism is wholly negative and necessarily damaging to the human spirit, John Marmysz offers a clear and complete definition to argue that it is compatible, and indeed preferably responded to, with an attitude of good humor. He carefully scrutinizes the phenomenon of nihilism as it appears in the works, lives, and actions of key figures in the history of philosophy, literature, politics, and theology, including Nietzsche, Heidegger, Camus, and Mishima. While suggesting that there ultimately is (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46. Humor, Sublimity and Incongruity.John Marmysz - 2001 - Consciousness, Literature and the Arts 2 (3).
    Humorous laughter is related to the sublime experience in that it involves the transformation of a potentially unpleasant perception into a pleasurable experience. However, whereas sublimity is associated with feelings of awe and respect, humorous laughter is associated with feelings of superiority and contempt. This difference is a result of the fact that sublimity is an affective response involving an individual’s perception of vulnerability while humorous laughter is a response involving perceived invulnerability.
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  47. Review of Patina: A Profane Archaeology, by Shannon Lee Dawdy. [REVIEW]Erich Hatala Matthes - 2018 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 76 (2):249-252.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  48. Drawing, Painting, and Print-Making.Patrick Maynard - 2009 - In Robert Hopkins (ed.), A Companion to Aesthetics: The Blackwell Companion to Philosophy, 2d rev. ed. Wiley-Blackwell.
    A short encyclopedia article focused on drawing, stressing facture, the physicality of three media.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  49. The Engine of Visualization: Thinking Through Photography.Patrick Maynard - 1997 - Cornell University Press.
    First ever philosophy treatise on photography, analytic in approach but sensitive to photo-history, not confined to aesthetics or art (illus.), Walker Evans photo on cover. Papercover printing, Dec. 2000.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  50. The Divine Average: A View of Comedy.William G. Mccollom - 1974 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 32 (3):438-439.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
1 — 50 / 124