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  1. Metaphor and Davidson's Theory of Interpretation.Jay Allman - 2001 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 39 (1):1-22.
  2. Languages of Art and Art Criticism.Monroe C. Beardsley - 1978 - Erkenntnis 12 (1):95 - 118.
    What implications does goodman's "languages of art" have for the theory and practice of art criticism? to account for the cognitive value of pictorial representations, It apparently requires to be supplemented by a concept of depiction, Or indefinite reference. For goodman's theory of expression to be convincing, Criteria are needed to discriminate exemplification in goodman's sense from the mere possession of labels. Some of the fundamental criteria of evaluation very widely used by art critics do not seem to be those (...)
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  3. Arte como desrealización.Alessandro Bertinetto - 2006 - Daimon: Revista Internacional de Filosofía 39:175-185.
    The paper recognizes the failure of contemporary non-aesthetic theories of art and aims at recovering the phenomenological notion of derealization – which re-emerges in A. Dantoʼs idea of the ʻbracketting effectʼ of art –, in order to explain art and art-experience. The main point is that art makes us free from the ʻreal worldʼ through an act of derealization that leads to the establishment of possible or fictional worlds different from the one we live in. Artworks are primarly imaginary, unreal (...)
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  4. Carolyn Bailey Gill, Ed., Maurice Blanchot: The Demand of Writing. [REVIEW]Victoria Burke - 1997 - Philosophy in Review 17:409-411.
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  5. Beardsley on Metaphor.H. G. Callaway - 1986 - Restant 14, Text, Literature and Aesthetics 14:73-88.
    Monroe C. Beardsley has made seminal contributions to the on-going discussions of metaphor, contributions of continuing relevance and influence. His "Verbal Opposition Theory," like Max Black's "Interaction Theory," is a classic document of the contemporary semantic approach to metaphor, and has placed special emphasis upon the recognition of metaphor --the problem of the metaphorical warrant--which has lead to a deeper understanding of the complexities of this problem.
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  6. Hyman on Naturalism and the Ram Jug.T. S. Champlin - 1994 - British Journal of Aesthetics 34 (2):146-150.
  7. Zhuangzi and the Nature of Metaphor.Kim Chong Chong - 2006 - Philosophy East and West 56 (3):370-391.
    : While it is well known that Zhuangzi uses metaphor extensively, there is much less appreciation of the role that it plays in his thought—a topic that is investigated in this essay. At the same time, this investigation is closely concerned with questions about the nature of metaphor. Comparisons are made between a central metaphorical structure in the Zhuangzi on the one hand and contemporary views of the nature of metaphor by Donald Davidson and by Lakoff and Johnson on the (...)
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  8. Peltz on Goodman on Exemplification.John Coldron - 1982 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 16 (1):87.
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  9. Evaluating Art: Reprise.George Dickie - 1999 - British Journal of Aesthetics 39 (3):288-296.
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  10. Gauguin and a Critical Fallacy.Jane Duran - 1994 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 28 (4):81-87.
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  11. Sign, Symbol, and System.Catherine Z. Elgin - forthcoming - Journal of Aesthetic Education.
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  12. What Goodman Leaves Out.Catherine Z. Elgin - 1991 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 25 (1):89-95.
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  13. The Intentional Relevance.Jeanette Emt - 1992 - Nordic Journal of Aesthetics 5 (8).
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  14. Vision, Image and Symbol.Fabio Fossa - 2015 - Aisthesis. Pratiche, Linguaggi E Saperi Dell’Estetico 8 (2):165-174.
    During the Fifties and the Early Sixties Hans Jonas developed a theory of man based on a series of concepts as separation of form from matter, image and symbol. By reflecting on these themes, Jonas seems to refer to the aesthetic abilities man embodies as the essence of human life. In this article I try to analyse Jonas’ thoughts on man and to determine to what extent it is possible to consider his theory as an aesthetic anthropology. Eventually, I discuss (...)
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  15. Evaluating Art.George Dickie - 1985 - British Journal of Aesthetics 25 (1):3-16.
  16. Evaluating Art.Alan Goldman - 2004 - In Peter Kivy (ed.), The Blackwell Guide to Aesthetics. Blackwell. pp. 93--108.
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  17. Goodman's Account of Representation.N. G. E. Harris - 1973 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 31 (3):323-327.
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  18. The Scope of the Intentional Fallacy.Iii Emilio Roma - 1966 - The Monist 50 (2):250 - 266.
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  19. The Intentional Model in Interpretation.Alex Kiefer - 2005 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 63 (3):271–281.
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  20. Kunstgeschichte Als Geistesgeschichte: The Lesson of Panofsky.Albert William Levi - 1986 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 20 (4):79.
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  21. Sensible Atoms: A Techno-Aesthetic Approach to Representation. [REVIEW]Sacha Loeve - 2011 - NanoEthics 5 (2):203-222.
    This essay argues that nano-images would be best understood with an aesthetical approach rather than with an epistemological critique. For this aim, I propose a ‘techno-aesthetical’ approach: an enquiry into the way instruments and machines transform the logic of the sensible itself and not just the way by which it represents something else. Unlike critical epistemology, which remains self-evidently grounded on a representationalist philosophy, the approach developed here presents the advantage of providing a clear-cut distinction between image-as-representation and other modes (...)
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  22. Gary Kemp and Gabriele M. Mras, Eds., Wollheim, Wittgenstein, and Pictorial Representation: Seeing-As and Seeing-In.Graham McFee - forthcoming - Estetika: The Central European Journal of Aesthetics.
    A review of Gary Kemp´s and Gabriele M. Mras´s Wollheim, Wittgenstein, and Pictorial Representation: Seeing-As and Seeing-In.
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  23. Davidson on Metaphorical Meaning: A Reply to Stainton.John Michael McGuire - 2003 - Dialogue 42 (02):355-.
    That the central thesis of Donald Davidson’s classic article on metaphor “What Metaphor Means” (WMM) is ambiguous between a weak and a strong interpretation is the primary claim that I sought to establish in my article “Sentence Meaning, Speaker Meaning, and Davidson’s Denial of Metaphorical Meaning.” In addition to this, I argued that the weak claim is trivially true and the strong claim is obviously false. Therefore, I concluded that when the central thesis of WMM is disambiguated, it is insignificant. (...)
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  24. Aesthetic Perception.Jennifer A. McMahon - 1996 - Communication and Cognition: An Interdisciplinary Quarterly Journal 29 (1):37-64.
    In this paper I suggest ways in which vision theory and psychology of perception may illuminate our understanding of beauty. I identify beauty as a phenomenon which is (i) ineffable, (ii) subjectively universal (intersubjective), and (iii) manifested in objects as formal structure. I present a model of perception by which I can identify a representation whose underlying principles would explain these features of beauty. The fact that these principles underlie the representation rather than constitute the content of representation, provides an (...)
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  25. What Goodman Leaves Out-Reply to Elgin, Catherine.Wjt Mitchell - 1991 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 25 (4):137-139.
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  26. Finn Fordham, I Do, I Undo, I Redo: The Textual Genesis of Modernist Selves in Hopkins, Yeats, Conrad, Forster, Joyce, and Woolf. [REVIEW]Anna Mudde - 2011 - Symposium: Canadian Journal of Continental Philosophy/Revue canadienne de philosophie continentale 15 (2):234-236.
  27. Diagrammatic Representation in Geometry.Dennis Potter - 2006 - Dialectica 60 (4):369–382.
    In this paper I offer a theory about the nature of diagrammatic representation in geometry. On my view, diagrammatic representaiton differs from pictorial representation in that neither the resemblance between the diagram and its object nor the experience of such a resemblance plays an essential role. Instead, the diagrammatic representation is arises from the role the components of the diagram play in a diagramatic practice that allows us to draws inferences based on them about the ojbects they represent.
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  28. A Leśniewskian Re-Examination of Goodman's Nominalistic Rejection of Classes.Judith M. Prakel - 1983 - Topoi 2 (1):87-98.
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  29. "The World of Icons": H. P. Gerhard. [REVIEW]David Talbot Rice - 1972 - British Journal of Aesthetics 12 (2):201.
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  30. Goodman.Jenefer Robinson - 2001 - In Berys Nigel Gaut & Dominic Lopes (eds.), The Routledge Companion to Aesthetics. Routledge.
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  31. Drawing Acts: Studies in Graphic Expression and Representation.David Rosand - 2005 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 63 (1):81-83.
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  32. From Instructional Social Computer Simulation to Heidegger's Aesthetics.Ron Shiro Saito - 2000 - Dissertation, Indiana University
    Using Schon's conception of reflection-in-action as an organizing structure, the author examines instructional social computer simulation by designing and reflecting upon computer prototypes and linking this analysis to appropriate literature. ;The author begins his study by examining the theoretical antecedents of model and location simulations. However, eventually agreeing with Dilthey's critique that society cannot be represented via scientific, law-like generalizations, he decides that model/location simulation reflects the "standard view of science" approach to the representation of society. ;Drawing from the interpretivist (...)
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  33. Nelson Goodman's ‘Languages of Art’: A Study.Anthony Savile - 1971 - British Journal of Aesthetics 11 (1):3-27.
    Reviews goodman's claims about representation, Expression and identity of works of art. Claims that the underlying nominalist logic effectively prohibits our understanding of these notions (pace goodman) and leaves everything which is of specific artistic and aesthetic interest out of account.
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  34. In Memoriam Flint Schier: 22 December 1953 – 28 May 1988.Eva Schaper - 1989 - British Journal of Aesthetics 29 (1):72-72.
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  35. In Memoriam: Flint Schier.Eva Schaper - 1989 - British Journal of Aesthetics 29 (1):72.
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  36. The Looking Backward Fallacy.Anita Silvers - 1977 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 35 (3):355-357.
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  37. Jan Mukařovský: The Semiology of Art.Ondřej Sládek - 2016 - Estetika: The Central European Journal of Aesthetics 53 (2):184-235.
    An introduction to an English translation of Jan Mukařovský´s lecture The Semiology of Art. In this lecture Mukařovský, a Czech aesthetician, literary historian, theorist, and leading proponent of Czech structuralism, develops his interpretation of the semiotics of art from a detailed explanation of the basic functions of the artistic sign. He emphasizes the role of the aesthetic function, which is dominant but latently and potentially contained in all the other functions of the linguistic and the artistic sign. He then defines (...)
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  38. Goodman on Authenticity.Douglas F. Stalker - 1978 - British Journal of Aesthetics 18 (3):195-198.
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  39. L'impossible Espace de" La Bibliothèque de Babel".Rudy Steinmetz - forthcoming - Rivista di Estetica.
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  40. This Impossible Toyen.Malynne Sternstein - 2010 - In Renée M. Silverman (ed.), Popular Avant-Garde. Rodopi.
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  41. Hobby Horses in Lascaux ? On Pictures and Semiosis.Jeroen Stumpel - 1993 - Argumentation 7 (1):103-117.
    This contribution is about semiology and art history. More specifically, it argues against the frequent claims that art history ought to take much more notice of semiology than it has tended to do so far. The argument against these claims is simple and basic: art history deals largely with images, and semiology does not — it has, in fact, little to say about them.Semiology has recently been presented as a “supra-disciplinary” theory” that, although in practice most often applied to written (...)
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  42. Seeing Metaphor as Seeing-As: Davidson's Positive View of Metaphor.Lynne Tirrell - 1991 - Philosophical Investigations 14 (2):143-154.
    Davidson suggests that metaphor is a pragmatic (not a semantic) phenomenon; it prompts its audience to see one thing as another. Davidson rightly attacks speaker-intentionalism as the source of metaphorical meaning, but settles for an account that depends on audience intentions. A better approach would undermine intentionalism per se, replacing it with a social practice analysis based on patterns of extending the metaphor. This paper shows why Davidson’s perceptual model fails to stave off semantic analysis, and argues that the professed (...)
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  43. The Parallel Fallacy: On Comparing Art and Science.David Topper - 1990 - British Journal of Aesthetics 30 (4):311-317.
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  44. Bound to Beauty: An Interview with Orlan.Peg Zeglin Brand Weiser - 2000 - In Peg Zeglin Brand Weiser (ed.), Beauty Matters. Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press. pp. 289-313.
    Orlan is a French performance artist whose work on beauty elicits shock and disgust. Beginning in 1990, she began a series of nine aesthetic surgeries entitled The Reincarnation of St. Orlan that altered her face and body, placed her at risk in the operating room, and centered her within certain controversy in the art world. Undergoing only epidural anaesthesia and controlling the performance to the greatest degree possible, she "choreographs" and documents the events. This enhanced interview I conducted with Orlan (...)
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  45. Misleading Aesthetic Norms of Beauty: Perceptual Sexism in Elite Women's Sports.Peg Zeglin Brand Weiser & Edward B. Weiser - 2016 - In Sherri Irvin (ed.), Body Aesthetics. Oxford University Press. pp. 192-221.
    The history of gender challenges faced by women in elite sports is fraught with controversy and injustice. These athletes' unique physical beauty creates what appears to be a paradox yet is, in fact, scientifically predictable. Intense training for the highest levels of competition leads to unique bodily strength and rare beauty associated with specific anatomic changes, leading top athletes to be singled out as exceptions from their gender and even excluded from competing. Authorities like the IOC and IAF, as well (...)
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  46. ‘‘‘Hegel, Formalism, and Robert Turner’s Ceramic Art’.Kenneth R. Westphal - 1997 - Jahrbuch für Hegelforschung 3:259–283.
    Hegel’s aesthetic ideal is the perfect integration of form and content within a work of art. This ideal is incompatible with the predominant 20th-century principle of formalist criticism, that form is the sole important factor in a work of art. Although the formalist dichotomy between form and content has been criticized on philosophical grounds, that does not suffice to justify Hegel’s ideal. Justifying Hegel’s ideal requires detailed art criticism that shows how form and content are, and why they should be, (...)
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  47. Tactile Relief: Reconsidering Medium and Modality Specificity.Fay Zika - 2005 - British Journal of Aesthetics 45 (4):426-437.
    My aim is to show that dissatisfaction with the term ‘tactile pictures’ and the proposal for ‘a multisensory pictorial aesthetic’ introduced by Dominic Lopes is due to an ambiguity of ‘picture’ between visual and spatial representation in-volving more than one sense. In order to avoid this ambiguity, I propose another term in its place and I investigate some of the directions that a richer multimedia and multimodal aesthetic can take.
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  48. Artistic Functions and the Intentional Fallacy.Clark Zumbach - 1984 - American Philosophical Quarterly 21 (2):147 - 156.
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Aesthetic Symbol Systems
  1. Christmas Mythologies: Sacred and Secular.Guy Bennett-Hunter - 2010 - In Scott C. Lowe (ed.), Christmas: Philosophy For Everyone. Wiley-Blackwell.
    On the 24th and 25th of December every year two very different stories are told: one in people’s homes, by the fireplace or Christmas tree, to pyjamaed but excited and sleepless children; the other to people of all ages in the more imposing setting of candlelit churches and cathedrals. I want to ask, in this essay: Does the telling of these two stories have anything in common? What can we learn by comparing them? The first one, the one I call (...)
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  2. Symbol Systems.Ben Blumson - 2014 - In Resemblance and Representation. Open Book Publishers. pp. 85-98.
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