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1 — 50 / 137
  1. added 2018-08-13
    On Not Explaining Anything Away.Eran Guter & Craig Fox - 2018 - In Gabriele M. Mras, Paul Weingartner & Bernhard Ritter (eds.), Philosophy of Logic and Mathematics, Contributions to the 41st International Wittgenstein Symposium. Kirchberg am Wechsel, Austria: Austrian Ludwig Wittgenstein Society. pp. 52-54.
    In this paper we explain Wittgenstein’s claim in a 1933 lecture that “aesthetics like psychoanalysis doesn’t explain anything away.” The discussions of aesthetics are distinctive: Wittgenstein gives a positive account of the relationship between aesthetics and psychoanalysis, as contrasted with psychology. And we follow not only his distinction between cause and reason, but also between hypothesis and representation, along with his use of the notion of ideals as facilitators of aesthetic discourse. We conclude that aesthetics, like psychoanalysis, preserves the verifying (...)
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  2. added 2018-04-08
    Korsmeyer on Fiction and Disgust.Filippo Contesi - 2015 - British Journal of Aesthetics 55 (1):109-116.
    In Savoring Disgust, Carolyn Korsmeyer argues that disgust is peculiar amongst emotions, for it does not need any of the standard solutions to the so-called paradox of fiction. I argue that Korsmeyer’s arguments in support of the peculiarity of disgust with respect to the paradox of fiction are not successful.
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  3. added 2018-02-17
    Painting an Experience: Las Meninas, Consciousness and the Aesthetic Mode.Ron Chrisley - 2008 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 15 (9):40-45.
    Paintings are usually paintings of things: a room in a palace, a princess, a dog. But what would it be to paint not those things, but the experience of seeing those things? Las Meninas is sufficiently sophisticated and masterfully executed to help us explore this question. Of course, there are many kinds of paintings: some abstract, some conceptual, some with more traditional subjects. Let us start with a focus on naturalistically depictive paintings: paintings that aim to cause an experience in (...)
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  4. added 2018-02-17
    The Meaning of the Body: Aesthetics of Human Understanding.Mark Johnson - 2007 - University of Chicago Press.
    In _The Meaning of the Body_, Mark Johnson continues his pioneering work on the exciting connections between cognitive science, language, and meaning first begun in the classic _Metaphors We Live By_. Johnson uses recent research into infant psychology to show how the body generates meaning even before self-consciousness has fully developed. From there he turns to cognitive neuroscience to further explore the bodily origins of meaning, thought, and language and examines the many dimensions of meaning—including images, qualities, emotions, and metaphors—that (...)
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  5. added 2018-02-16
    Medium, Subject Matter and Representation.John Dilworth - 2003 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 41 (1):45-62.
    I argue that the physical marks on a canvas resulting from an artist's intentional, stylistic and expressive acts cannot themselves be the artist's expression, but instead they serve to signify or indicate those acts. Thus there is a kind of indicative content associated with a picture that is distinct from its subject matter (or 'representational content'). I also argue that this kind of indicative content is closely associated with the specific artistic medium chosen by the artist as her expressive medium, (...)
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  6. added 2018-02-10
    Virginia Woolf, Literary Style, and Aesthetic Education. Simoniti - 2016 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 50 (1):62-79.
    Works of literature represent stories, characters, and events: these are the contents of a work. Often, the contents of literary works are fictional; however, it is just as characteristic of works of literature that these contents are narrated in a distinct style of writing, in an author’s distinct literary “voice.” In this paper, I consider whether works of literature might represent something over and above their fictional contents in virtue of their style alone and what consequences this might have for (...)
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  7. added 2017-02-23
    Reasoned and Unreasoned Judgement: On Inference, Acquaintance and Aesthetic Normativity.Dan Cavedon-Taylor - 2017 - British Journal of Aesthetics 57 (1):1-17.
    Aesthetic non-inferentialism is the widely-held thesis that aesthetic judgements either are identical to, or are made on the basis of, sensory states like perceptual experience and emotion. It is sometimes objected to on the basis that testimony is a legitimate source of such judgements. Less often is the view challenged on the grounds that one’s inferences can be a source of aesthetic judgements. This paper aims to do precisely that. According to the theory defended here, aesthetic judgements may be unreasoned, (...)
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  8. added 2017-02-15
    Art as Understanding.D. N. Perkins - 1988 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 22 (1):111.
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  9. added 2017-02-14
    This Is Art: A Defence of R. G. Collingwood's Philosophy of Art.James Camien McGuiggan - 2017 - Dissertation, University of Southampton
    R. G. Collingwood’s 'The Principles of Art' argues that art is the expression of emotion. This dissertation offers a new interpretation of that philosophy, and argues that this interpretation is both hermeneutically and philosophically plausible. The offered interpretation differs from the received interpretation most significantly in treating the concept of ‘art’ as primarily scalarly rather than binarily realisable (this is introduced in ch. 1), and in understanding Collingwood’s use of the term ‘emotion’ more broadly (introduced in ch. 2). -/- After (...)
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  10. added 2017-01-29
    Metaphoric Understanding.Felicity Haynes - 1978 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 12 (2):99.
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  11. added 2017-01-29
    On Understanding Awareness.Charles W. Rusch - 1970 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 4 (4):57.
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  12. added 2017-01-28
    "Symmetry: Unifying Human Understanding": Edited by István Hargittai. [REVIEW]Philip Meeson - 1987 - British Journal of Aesthetics 27 (3):297.
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  13. added 2017-01-28
    "Understanding Persons": F. M. Berenson. [REVIEW]Ruth Cigman - 1982 - British Journal of Aesthetics 22 (4):380.
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  14. added 2017-01-28
    Understanding Bharata Natyam.Mrinalini Sarabhai - 1967 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 25 (4):473-474.
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  15. added 2016-12-27
    The Cognitive Value of Blade Runner.McGregor Rafe - 2015 - Aesthetic Investigations 1 (2).
    The purpose of this essay is to argue that Blade Runner: The Final Cut (Ridley Scott, 2007) has cognitive value which is inseparable from its value as a work of cinema. I introduce the cinematic philosophy debate in §1. §2 sets out my position: that the Final Cut affirms the proposition there is no necessary relation between humanity and human beings. I outline the combination of cinematic depiction with distinctive features of the narrative’s peripeteia in §3. In §4, I explain (...)
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  16. added 2016-12-22
    The World of Perception.Maurice Merleau-Ponty - 2004 - Routledge.
    'Painting does not imitate the world, but is a world of its own.' In 1948, Maurice Merleau-Ponty wrote and delivered on French radio a series of seven lectures on the theme of perception. Translated here into English for the first time, they offer a lucid and concise insight into one of the great philosophical minds of the twentieth-century. These lectures explore themes central not only to Merleau-Ponty's philosophy but phenomenology as a whole. He begins by rejecting the idea - inherited (...)
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  17. added 2016-12-12
    Beyond Aesthetics: Philosophical Essays.Noël Carroll - 2001 - Cambridge University Press.
    Beyond Aesthetics brings together philosophical essays addressing art and related issues by one of the foremost philosophers of art at work today. Countering conventional aesthetic theories - those maintaining that authorial intention, art history, morality and emotional responses are irrelevant to the experience of art - Noël Carroll argues for a more pluralistic and commonsensical view in which all of these factors can play a legitimate role in our encounter with art works. Throughout, the book combines philosophical theorizing with illustrative (...)
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  18. added 2016-12-05
    Art and Knowledge.James O. Young - 2001 - Routledge.
    Almost all of us would agree that the experience of art is deeply rewarding. Why this is the case remains a puzzle; nor does it explain why many of us find works of art much more important than other sources of pleasure. Art and Knowledge argues that the experience of art is so rewarding because it can be an important source of knowledge about ourselves and our relation to each other and to the world. The view that art is a (...)
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  19. added 2016-11-01
    Aesthetic Ineffability.Silvia Jonas - 2017 - Philosophy Compass 12 (2):e12396.
    This essay provides an overview of the ways in which contemporary philosophers have tried to make sense of ineffability as encountered in aesthetic contexts. Section 1 sets up the problem of aesthetic ineffability by putting it into historical perspective. Section 2 specifies the kinds of questions that may be raised with regard to aesthetic ineffability, as well as the kinds of answer each one of those questions would require. Section 3 investigates arguments that seek to locate aesthetic ineffability within the (...)
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  20. added 2016-10-18
    Cognitive Function of Beauty and Ugliness in Light of Kant’s Theory of Aesthetic Ideas.Mojca Küplen - 2015 - In Andras Benedek and Kristof Nyiri (ed.), Beyond Words: Pictures, Parables, Paradoxes (Series Visual Leaning, vol. 5). Peter Lang Publisher. pp. 209-216.
  21. added 2015-09-25
    Beauty, Ugliness and the Free Play of Imagination: An Approach to Kant's Aesthetics.Mojca Küplen - 2015 - Springer Verlag.
    At the end of section §6 in the Analytic of the Beautiful, Kant defines taste as the “faculty for judging an object or a kind of representation through a satisfaction or dissatisfaction without any interest”. On the face of it, Kant’s definition of taste includes both; positive and negative judgments of taste. Moreover, Kant’s term ‘dissatisfaction’ implies not only that negative judgments of taste are those of the non-beautiful, but also that of the ugly, depending on the presence of an (...)
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  22. added 2015-08-26
    Originality and Value.Christopher Bartel - 2010 - Hermeneia:66-77.
    What does it mean to describe a work of art as being ‘original’? Frank Sibley believed that works of art are not valued for their originality independently of their aesthetic value. He argued that a work may be described as being ‘original’ if it is innovative and also exhibits some further aesthetic value. In this essay, I argue against this conjunctive account of originality as some kind of innovation-plus-value. I claim that a work may be valued for and described as (...)
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  23. added 2015-06-08
    Kunst, Kontext und Erkenntnis.Christoph Jäger - 2005 - In Christoph Jäger & Georg Meggle (eds.), Kunst und Erkenntnis. mentis. pp. 9-39.
  24. added 2015-06-01
    Aesthetic Value, Artistic Value, and Morality.Andrea Sauchelli - 2016 - In David Coady, Kimberley Brownlee & Kasper Lipper-Rasmussen (eds.), Blackwell Companion to Applied Philosophy. Blackwell. pp. 514-526.
    This entry surveys issues at the intersection of art and morality. Particular emphasis is placed on whether, and in what way, the moral character of a work of art influences its artistic value. Other topics include the educational function of art and artistic censorship.
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  25. added 2015-03-19
    Hermeneutical Circle in the Understanding of Art.Suhhyun Park - 2008 - Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 21:45-52.
    In Truth and Method, Gadamer tries to show that the understanding of art is scientific (wissenscaftlich). But even though the understanding of art is a kind of science, it is different from natural sciences. As objects of human sciences (Geisteswissenschaft), works of art should be dealt differently than in dealing with theobjects of natural sciences. But if the understanding of art is somewhat scientific, it means that in artistic understanding there is a claim to truth which is different from such (...)
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  26. added 2015-02-08
    Memories of Art.William Hirstein - 2013 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (2):146 - 147.
    Although the art-historical context of a work of art is important to our appreciation of it, it is our knowledge of that history that plays causal roles in producing the experience itself. This knowledge is in the form of memories, both semantic memories about the historical circumstances, but also episodic memories concerning our personal connections with an artwork. We also create representations of minds in order to understand the emotions that artworks express.
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  27. added 2015-02-05
    Modelling Aesthetic Judgment: An Interactive-Semiotic Perspective.Ioannis Xenakis, Argyris Arnellos, Thomas Spyrou & John Darzentas - 2012 - Cybernetics and Human Knowing 19 (3).
    Aesthetic experience, as a cognitive activity is a fundamental part of the interaction process in which an agent attempts to interpret his/her environment in order to support the fundamental process of decision making. Proposing a four-level interactive model, we underline and indicate the functions that provide the operations of aesthetic experience and, by extension, of aesthetic judgment. Particularly in this paper, we suggest an integration of the fundamental Peircean semiotic parameters and their related levels of semiotic organization with the proposed (...)
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  28. added 2015-01-16
    Aesthetic Autonomy: Tracing the Kantian Legacy to Olafur Eliasson.Jennifer A. McMahon - 2011 - Proceedings of the European Society of Aesthetics, 2011.
    Aesthetic autonomy is sometimes equated with an art for art’s sake approach to art. On the contrary, the philosophers whose work is often cited as backup to this concept of aesthetic autonomy held a very different conception of it. I will trace an alternative notion of aesthetic autonomy in the work of Adorno and Habermas, the origins of which can be found in Immanuel Kant’s aesthetic theory, the popular notion of his formalism, notwithstanding. I draw upon the art practice of (...)
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  29. added 2014-12-22
    Kunst und Wissen in der Moderne.Andreas Dorschel (ed.) - 2009 - Böhlau.
    The relationship between art and knowledge is subject to historical change. In the early 19th century, the view was still prevalent that art was about eternal values, especially beauty, whereas science was entirely involved in historical time: The former was seen as contemplative, the latter as searching. But ever since, most artists have given up that stance and hence the once imagined detachment from historical time. They search, and sometimes research, too. Does that mean that art and science have come (...)
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  30. added 2014-04-02
    Nature, Aesthetic Appreciation, and Knowledge.Allen Carlson - 1995 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 53 (4):393-400.
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  31. added 2014-04-02
    Understanding: Art and Science.Catherine Z. Elgin - 1993 - Synthese 95 (1):196-208.
    The arts and the sciences perform many of the same cognitive functions, both serving to advance understanding. This paper explores some of the ways exemplification operates in the two fields. Both scientific experiments and works of art highlight, underscore, display, or convey some of their own features. They thereby focus attention on them, and make them available for examination and projection. Thus, the Michelson-Morley experiment exemplifies the constancy of the speed of light. Jackson Pollock'sNumber One exemplifies the viscosity of paint. (...)
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  32. added 2014-04-01
    Logic, Art, and Understanding in the Philosophy of Nelson Goodman.Günter Abel - 1991 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 34 (3-4):311 – 321.
    This paper contains a reconstruction and discussion of some central subjects in Nelson Goodman's philosophical work. Goodman's creative symbol-constructional philosophy concerns fundamental aspects of human cognition and practice. It is argued that this provides us with the intellectual tools for constructing a genuine relationship between logic, knowledge, art, and understanding. This is shown by focusing on subjects ranging from the projectibility of predicates and nominalistic mereology to constructive relativity, ways of worldmaking and a general theory of symbols.
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  33. added 2014-03-31
    Wittgenstein's Musical Understanding.Sarah E. Worth - 1997 - British Journal of Aesthetics 37 (2):158-167.
  34. added 2014-03-31
    Metaphor and the Understanding of Art.Berys Gaut - 1997 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 97 (1):223–241.
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  35. added 2014-03-30
    Schopenhauer on Aesthetic Understanding and the Values of Art.Bart Vandenabeele - 2008 - European Journal of Philosophy 16 (2):194-210.
    The article explores German philosopher Arthur Schopenhauer's view on aesthetics and the values of art. It contends that some important aspects of Schopenhauer's discussion of tragedy indicate that the theory that the value of art is deductible to the aesthetic pleasure it affords is inadequate. Moreover, it claims that Schopenhauer attaches great importance to the distinction between concept and idea. It also asserts that Schopenhauer's account of aesthetic experience is inspired by Plato's ideas.
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  36. added 2014-03-29
    How and What We Can Learn From Fiction.Mitchell Green - 2010 - In Garry Hagberg & Walter Jost (eds.), A Companion to the Philosophy of Literature. Wiley-Blackwell.
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  37. added 2014-03-29
    McAllister's Aesthetics in Science: A Critical Notice.David Davies - 1998 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 12 (1):25 – 32.
    In Beauty and Revolution in Science, James McAllister argues that a sophisticated rationalist image of science can accommodate two prominent features of actual scientific practice, namely, appeals to “aesthetic” criteria in theory choice, and the occurrence of scientific “revolutions”. The aesthetic criteria to which scientists appeal are, he maintains, inductively grounded in the empirical record of competing theories, and scientific revolutions involve changes in aestheic criteria bu continuity in empirical criteria of theory choice. I raise difficulties for McAllister's account concerning: (...)
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  38. added 2014-03-28
    Musical Understandings.Stephen Davies - 2011 - New York;Oxford University Press.
    In this chapter, I discuss the kinds of understanding expected of and evinced by skilled listeners, performers, analysts, and composers. I confine the discussion to Western, purely instrumental music, mainly with the classical tradition in mind.[1] And I refer primarily to the Anglophone literature of "analytic" philosophy of music. As will become apparent, my concern is with an analysis that maps what are meant to be familiar aspects of musical experience. I investigate the various understandings expected of an accomplished listener, (...)
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  39. added 2014-03-27
    Reorienting Aesthetics, Reconceiving Cognition.Catherine Z. Elgin - 2000 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 58 (3):219-225.
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  40. added 2014-03-26
    Empathy with Fictions.James Harold - 2000 - British Journal of Aesthetics 40 (3):340-355.
    IT IS DIFFICULT for me to read Pride and Prejudice without empathizing either with Elizabeth Bennet, or sometimes with her father, Mr Bennet. Not only do my own responses to and opinions of the events and characters of the book at times resemble theirs, but even when they do not, I find myself seeing the event from Elizabeth’s or Mr Bennet’s point of view. For example, at the close of the book, Elizabeth’s former dislike of Mr Darcy has completely vanished, (...)
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  41. added 2014-03-25
    Understanding Works of Art: Universality, Unity and Uniqueness.Petra von Morstein - 1982 - British Journal of Aesthetics 22 (4):350-362.
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  42. added 2014-03-24
    The Omniscienter: Beauty and Scientific Understanding.Peter Kosso - 2002 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 16 (1):39 – 48.
    Science has more to offer than just knowledge of nature; it can give us understanding of nature as well. Epistemology of science is usually focused on knowledge and the criteria of justification, while paying little attention to understanding. In a reversal of this emphasis, this article is more about scientific understanding. I argue that the hallmarks of understanding are similar to an aesthetic feature associated with literature, music, and the visual arts. It is the feature described as coherence, harmony, and (...)
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  43. added 2014-03-24
    Recent Work on Aesthetics of Science.James W. McAllister - 2002 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 16 (1):7 – 11.
    This introduction to the special issue on "Aesthetics of Science" reviews recent philosophical research on aesthetic aspects of science. Topics represented in this research include the aesthetic properties of scientific images, theories, and experiments; the relation of science and art; the role of aesthetic criteria in scientific practice and their effect on the development of science; aesthetic aspects of mathematics; the contrast between a classic and a Romantic aesthetic; and the relation between emotion, cognition, and rationality.
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  44. added 2014-03-24
    The Neglected Programme of Aesthetics.Steffen W. Gross - 2002 - British Journal of Aesthetics 42 (4):403-414.
    Aesthetics is today widely seen as the philosophy of art and/or beauty, limited to artworks and their perception. In this paper, I will argue that today's aesthetics and the original programme developed by the German Enlightenment thinker Alexander Gottlieb Baumgarten in the first half of the eighteenth century have only the name in common. Baumgarten did not primarily develop his aesthetics as a philosophy of art. The making and understanding of artworks had served in his original programme only as an (...)
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  45. added 2014-03-24
    Scientific Knowledge and the Aesthetic Appreciation of Nature.Patricia Matthews - 2002 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 60 (1):37–48.
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  46. added 2014-03-24
    Art and Knowledge.Gordon Graham - 2002 - British Journal of Aesthetics 42 (4):432-434.
  47. added 2014-03-24
    Aesthetic Cognition.Robert S. Root-Bernstein - 2002 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 16 (1):61 – 77.
    The purpose of this article is to integrate two outstanding problems within the philosophy of science. The first concerns what role aesthetics plays in scientific thinking. The second is the problem of how logically testable ideas are generated (the so-called "psychology of research" versus "logic of (dis)proof" problem). I argue that aesthetic sensibility is the basis for what scientists often call intuition, and that intuition in turn embodies (in a literal physiological sense) ways of thinking that have their own meta-logic. (...)
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  48. added 2014-03-24
    Mathematics and Aesthetic Considerations in Science.Mark Colyvan - 2002 - Mind 111 (441):69-74.
  49. added 2014-03-22
    Gadamer, Aesthetic Modernism, and the Rehabilitation of Allegory: The Relevance of Paul Klee.Stephen Watson - 2004 - Research in Phenomenology 34 (1):45-72.
    Paul Klee's art found broad impact upon philosophers of varying commitments, including Hans-Georg Gadamer. Moreover, Klee himself was not only one of the most important artists of aesthetic modernism but one of its leading theoreticians, and much in his work, as in Gadamer's, originated in post-Kantian literary theory's explications of symbol and allegory. Indeed at one point in Truth and Method, Gadamer associates his project for a general "theory of hermeneutic experience" not only with Goethe's metaphysical account of the symbolic (...)
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  50. added 2014-03-22
    Sublime Understanding: Aesthetic Reflection in Kant and Hegel.Ruben Berrios - 2003 - British Journal of Aesthetics 43 (4):422-424.
1 — 50 / 137