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  1. Art and Science.S. Alexander - 1926 - Philosophy 1 (1):5.
    The thesis which I wish to recommend to you is that science is a form of art though not of fine art: that like art, it is a human invention, not less real for that, and having value, or being valuable, partly if not mainly because of that. I mean to indicate by this statement that for me at least a better insight can be got into the nature of science by considering it as a form of art, and asking (...)
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  2. Prégnances du devenir. Simondon et les images.Emmanuel Alloa - 2015 - Critique 816:356-371.
    Problématisation, individuation, (dés)adaptation L’inventivité du vivant : la « disparation » Mouvements à vide. La spontanéité selon Simondon La prégnance des images Ontogenèse, phylogenèse, eikogenèse. L’image comme médiation .
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  3. Review Of: "Strange Tools: Art and Human Nature" by Alva Noe. [REVIEW]Lauren R. Alpert - 2016 - Asage 8 (1):1-3.
    Strange Tools foregoes stolid conventions of professional philosophy, laudably broadening the book’s appeal to accommodate a popular audience. However, Noë’s manner of glossing over complex issues about art does not necessarily render these topics intelligible to philosophical novices. Instead, his oversimplifications will tend to confirm naïve notions that art is straightforward – a common misconception that a foray into philosophy of art ought to dispel, not corroborate.
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  4. The Moving Boundary: Art, Science, and the Construction of Reality.Walter Truett Anderson - 1994 - World Futures 40 (1):27-34.
    (1994). The moving boundary: Art, science, and the construction of reality. World Futures: Vol. 40, Art and Science: Studies from the World Academy of Art and Science, pp. 27-34.
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  5. Is a Universal Science of Aesthetics Possible?Archie J. Bahm - 1972 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 31 (1):3-7.
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  6. The Paradox of Horror: Fear as a Positive Emotion.Katerina Bantinaki - 2012 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 70 (4):2012.
  7. Science and Art: The New Golem: From the Transdisciplinary to an Ultra-Disciplinary Epistemology.R. Berger - 1990 - Diogenes 38 (152):124-146.
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  8. Neuroaesthetics Edited by Skov, Martin and Oshin Vartanian.Vincent Bergeron - 2010 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 68 (2):191-192.
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  9. On Interpretative Activity: A Peircian Approach to the Interpretation of Science, Technology, and the Arts.Noel Boulting - 2006 - Brill.
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  10. The Pulse of Modernism: Experimental Physiology and Aesthetic Avant-Gardes Circa 1900.Robert Michael Brain - 2008 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 39 (3):393-417.
    When discussing the changing sense of reality around 1900 in the cultural arts the lexicon of early modernism reigns supreme. This essay contends that a critical condition for the possibility of many of the turn of the century modernist movements in the arts can be found in exchange of instruments, concepts, and media of representation between the sciences and the arts. One route of interaction came through physiological aesthetics, the attempt to ‘elucidate physiologically the nature of our Aesthetic feelings’ and (...)
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  11. The Aesthetic Stance - on the Conditions and Consequences of Becoming a Beholder.Maria Brincker - 2015 - In Alfonsina Scarinzi (ed.), Aesthetics and the Embodied Mind: Beyond Art Theory and the Cartesian Mind-Body Dichotomy. Springer. pp. 117-138.
    What does it mean to be an aesthetic beholder? Is it different than simply being a perceiver? Most theories of aesthetic perception focus on 1) features of the perceived object and its presentation or 2) on psychological evaluative or emotional responses and intentions of perceiver and artist. In this chapter I propose that we need to look at the process of engaged perception itself, and further that this temporal process of be- coming a beholder must be understood in its embodied, (...)
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  12. The Artful Mind Meets Art History: Toward a Psycho-Historical Framework for the Science of Art Appreciation.Nicolas J. Bullot & Rolf Reber - 2013 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (2):123-180.
    Research seeking a scientific foundation for the theory of art appreciation has raised controversies at the intersection of the social and cognitive sciences. Though equally relevant to a scientific inquiry into art appreciation, psychological and historical approaches to art developed independently and lack a common core of theoretical principles. Historicists argue that psychological and brain sciences ignore the fact that artworks are artifacts produced and appreciated in the context of unique historical situations and artistic intentions. After revealing flaws in the (...)
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  13. Ambiguity in Art and Science.Giuseppe Caglioti - 1994 - World Futures 40 (1):63-74.
    All processes of measurement imply symmetry?breaking. Ambiguity is the coexistence of mutually incompatible aspects of the same structure. There are many examples of analogy and symmetry breaking in nature and in culture.
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  14. Towards a Sensorimotor Aesthetics of Performing Art.B. Calvomerino, C. Jola, D. Glaser & P. Haggard - 2008 - Consciousness and Cognition 17 (3):911-922.
    The field of neuroaesthetics attempts to identify the brain processes underlying aesthetic experience, including but not limited to beauty. Previous neuroaesthetic studies have focussed largely on paintings and music, while performing arts such as dance have been less studied. Nevertheless, increasing knowledge of the neural mechanisms that represent the bodies and actions of others, and which contribute to empathy, make a neuroaesthetics of dance timely. Here, we present the first neuroscientific study of aesthetic perception in the context of the performing (...)
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  15. Neuroaesthetics: Range and Restrictions.Anjan Chatterjee - 2013 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (2):137-138.
    Bullot & Reber (B&R) should be commended for highlighting tensions between scientific aesthetics and art history. The question of how each tradition can learn from the other is timely. While I am sympathetic to their views, their diagnosis of the problem appears exaggerated and their solution partial. They underestimate the reach of scientific aesthetics while failing to identify its inherent restrictions.
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  16. Neuroaesthetics.Anjan Chatterjee & Oshin Vartanian - 2014 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 18 (7):370-375.
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  17. Geometry, Embodied Cognition and Choreographic Praxis.Jonathan Owen Clark & Taku Ando - 2014 - International Journal of Performance Arts and Digital Media 10 (2):179-192.
    A common approach to movement creation amongst contemporary choreographers involves dancers being asked to create movement in response to instructions that require them to form mental images, and then to make decisions in response to the internal feedback loops these images generate. The formation of these images is also facilitated in many cases by the use of digital technologies, via data representation and visualization. This article explores connections between technology, choreographic praxis, cognitive science and related topics in the philosophy of (...)
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  18. Music, Emotions and the Influence of the Cognitive Sciences.Tom Cochrane - 2010 - Philosophy Compass 5 (11):978-988.
    This article reviews some of the ways in which philosophical problems concerning music can be informed by approaches from the cognitive sciences (principally psychology and neuroscience). Focusing on the issues of musical expressiveness and the arousal of emotions by music, the key philosophical problems and their alternative solutions are outlined. There is room for optimism that while current experimental data does not always unambiguously satisfy philosophical scrutiny, it can potentially support one theory over another, and in some cases allow us (...)
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  19. Making the Difference: John Dewey and the Naturalization of Aesthetics.Jean-Pierre Cometti - 2015 - Aisthesis. Pratiche, Linguaggi E Saperi Dell’Estetico 8 (1):123-134.
    The “Neuronal man”, as Changeux has called him, is now credited with an aesthetic mind. This mind is not the “Geist” of the philosophical tradition. The cognitive sciences have took over from philosophy and now they deal with art and aesthetics as they do with whatever aspect of human thought, experience and activity. Philosophers like Kant were interested in the empirical sources of beauty, but for him empirical features of its development did not change anything at all to its very (...)
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  20. Auditory Neuroscience: Making Sense of Sound.Adam M. Croom - 2014 - Musicae Scientiae: The Journal of the European Society for the Cognitive Sciences of Music 18:1-3.
  21. Neuroaesthetics and Beyond: New Horizons in Applying the Science of the Brain to the Art of Dance. [REVIEW]Emily Cross & Luca Ticini - 2012 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 11 (1):5-16.
    Throughout history, dance has maintained a critical presence across all human cultures, defying barriers of class, race, and status. How dance has synergistically co-evolved with humans has fueled a rich debate on the function of art and the essence of aesthetic experience, engaging numerous artists, historians, philosophers, and scientists. While dance shares many features with other art forms, one attribute unique to dance is that it is most commonly expressed with the human body. Because of this, social scientists and neuroscientists (...)
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  22. Emerging Visions of the Aesthetic Process: Psychology, Semiology, and Philosophy.Gerald C. Cupchik & János László (eds.) - 1992 - Cambridge University Press.
    This book is about aesthetic processes and play from the perspectives of psychologists, philosophers, and semiologists. They explore the underlying processes from many viewpoints, including the prehistoric roots of language and art; the historical evolution of artistic, literary, and musical styles; the structure of artworks from both gestalt and semiotic perspectives; the biological and psychological processes underlying production and appreciation; the appeal of sentimental art; emotional responses to art and other aesthetic forms; personality in relation to artistic style; the testing (...)
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  23. Aesthetics and the Sciences of Mind.Greg Currie, Matthew Kieran, Aaron Meskin & Jon Robson (eds.) - 2014 - Oxford University Press.
    How far should philosophical accounts of the value and interpretation of art be sensitive to the scientific approaches used by psychologists, sociologists, and evolutionary thinkers? A team of experts urge different answers to this question, and explore how empirical inquiry can shed light on problems traditionally regarded as philosophical.
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  24. Imagination as Simulation: Aesthetics Meets Cognitive Science.Gregory Currie - 1995 - In Martin Davies & Tony Stone (eds.), Mental Simulation. Blackwell.
  25. The Psychology of Art and the Evolution of the Conscious Brain.S. Davies - 2007 - British Journal of Aesthetics 47 (1):97-99.
  26. The Artful Species: Aesthetics, Art, and Evolution.Stephen Davies - 2012 - Oxford University Press.
    Stephen Davies presents a fascinating exploration of the idea that art, and our aesthetic sensibilities more generally, should be understood as an element in human evolution. He asks: Do animals have aesthetics? Do our aesthetic preferences have prehistoric roots? Is art universal? What is the biological role of aesthetic and artistic behaviour?
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  27. Ellen Dissanayake's Evolutionary Aesthetic.Stephen J. Davies - 2004 - Biology and Philosophy 20 (2-3):291-304.
    Dissanayake argues that art behaviors – which she characterizes first as patterns or syndromes of creation and response and later as rhythms and modes of mutuality – are universal, innate, old, and a source of intrinsic pleasure, these being hallmarks of biological adaptation. Art behaviors proved to enhance survival by reinforcing cooperation, interdependence, and community, and, hence, became selected for at the genetic level. Indeed, she claims that art is essential to the fullest realization of our human nature. I make (...)
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  28. Cross-Cultural Musical Expressiveness: Theory and the Empirical Programme.Stephen Davies & Peter Goldie - unknown
    In sections I-VII of this chapter I outline the theoretical background for a research programme considering whether the expressiveness of a culture’s music can be recognised by people from different musical cultures, that is, by people whose music is syntactically and structurally distinct from that of the target culture. In sections VIII-IX, I examine and assess the cross-cultural studies that have been undertaken by psychologists. Most of these studies are compromised by methodological inadequacies.
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  29. Color Perception: Philosophical, Psychological, Artistic, and Computational Perspectives.Davis Steven (ed.) - 2000 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    Color has been studied for centuries, but has never been completely understood. Digital technology has recently sparked a burgeoning interdisciplinary interest in color. The fact that color is a quality of perception rather than a physical quality brings up a host of interesting questions of interest to both artists and scholars. This volume--the ninth in the Vancouver Studies in Cognitive Science series--brings together chapters by psychologists, philosophers, computer scientists, and artists to explore the nature of human color perception with the (...)
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  30. Aesthetic Ineffability.Rafael De Clercq - 2000 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 7 (8-9):87-97.
    In this paper I argue that recent attempts at explaining aesthetic ineffability have been unsuccessful. Either they misrepresent what aesthetic ineffability consists in, or they leave important aspects of it unexplained. I then show how a more satisfying account might be developed, once a distinction is made between two kinds of awareness. -/- .
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  31. The Propositional Challenge to Aesthetics.John Dilworth - 2008 - British Journal of Aesthetics 48 (2):115-144.
    It is generally accepted that Picasso might have used a different canvas as the vehicle for his painting Guernica, and also that the artwork Guernica itself necessarily represents a certain historical episode—rather than, say, a bowl of fruit. I argue that such a conjunctive acceptance entails a broadly propositional view of the nature of representational artworks. In addition, I argue—via a comprehensive examination of possible alternatives—that, perhaps surprisingly, there simply is no other available conjunctive view of the nature of representational (...)
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  32. A Double Content Theory of Artistic Representation.John Dilworth - 2005 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 63 (3):249–260.
    The representational content or subject matter of a picture is normally distinguished from various non-representational components of meaning involved in artworks, such as expressive, stylistic or intentional factors. However, I show how such non subject matter components may themselves be analyzed in content terms, if two different categories of representation are recognized--aspect indication for stylistic etc. factors, and normal representation for subject matter content. On the account given, the relevant kinds of content are hierarchically structured, with relatively unconceptualized lower level (...)
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  33. Reforming Indicated Type Theories.John Dilworth - 2005 - British Journal of Aesthetics 45 (1):11-31.
    There is some intuitive plausibility to the idea that composers create musical works by indicating sonic types in a historical context. But the idea is technically indefensible as it stands, requiring a thorough representational reform that also eliminates the type-theoretic commitments of current versions. On the reformed account, musical 'indication' is an operation of high level representational interpretation of concrete sounds, that can both explain the creativity of composers, and the often successful interpretations of their listeners. This approach also bypasses (...)
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  34. Theater, Representation, Types and Interpretation.John Dilworth - 2002 - American Philosophical Quarterly 39 (2):197-209.
    In the performing arts, including music, theater, dance and so on, theoretical issues both about artworks and about performances of them must be dealt with, so that their theoretical analysis is inherently more complex and troublesome than that of nonperforming arts such as painting or film, in which primarily only artworks need to be discussed. Thus it is especially desirable in the case of the performing arts to look for defensible broad theoretical simplifications or generalizations that could serve to unify (...)
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  35. “Aesthetic Primitives”: Fundamental Biological Elements of a Naturalistic Aesthetics.Ellen Dissanayake - 2015 - Aisthesis. Pratiche, Linguaggi E Saperi Dell’Estetico 8 (1):6-24.
    Aesthetics, like other philosophical subjects, has historically made use of «top down» methods. Recent discoveries in genetics, evolutionary psychology, paleoarchaeology, and neuroscience call for a new «naturalistic» or «bottom up» perspective. Combining these fields with behavioral biology and ethnoarts studies, I offer seven premises that underlie a new understanding of evolved predispositions of the brain/mind that all artists use to attract attention, sustain interest, and create, mold, and shape emotion. I describe aesthetic «primitives» in somatic and behavioral modalities, suggesting that (...)
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  36. Shared Aesthetic Starting Points?Roberta Dreon - 2015 - Aisthesis. Pratiche, Linguaggi E Saperi Dell’Estetico 8 (1):53-69.
    Are there any theoretical resources – conceptual, lexical or argumentative ones – in the interdisciplinary debate on the evolutionary origins of the arts that can help us go beyond the traditional autonomistic conception of art, in favour of a more continuist and inclusive interpretation of human artistic practices? The paper examines the different voices in the debate, against the background of a cultural naturalist attitude inspired by John Dewey, by focusing on those contributions which can be interpreted in non-reductionist, anti-foundationalist (...)
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  37. The Art Instinct: Beauty, Pleasure, & Human Evolution.Denis Dutton - 2009 - Bloomsbury Press.
    Introduction -- Landscape and longing -- Art and human nature -- What is art? -- But they don't have our concept of art -- Art and natural selection -- The uses of fiction -- Art and human self-domestication -- Intention, forgery, dada : three aesthetic problems -- The contingency of aesthetic values -- Greatness in the arts.
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  38. Aesthetics and Evolutionary Psychology.Denis Dutton - 2003 - In Jerrold Levinson (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Aesthetics. Oxford University Press.
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  39. Images of Eden: An Enquiry Into the Psychology of Aesthetics.Arthur M. Edwards - 1999 - Gazelle Book Services.
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  40. NANAY, BENCE. Aesthetics as Philosophy of Perception. Oxford University Press, 2016, 192 Pp., $65.00 Cloth. [REVIEW]John Andrew Fisher - 2017 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 75 (2):210-214.
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  41. Echo Objects: The Cognitive Work of Images by Stafford, Barbara Maria.Shannon Foskett - 2011 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 69 (2):249-251.
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  42. Phenomenology and Neuroaesthetics.Elio Franzini - 2015 - Aisthesis. Pratiche, Linguaggi E Saperi Dell’Estetico 8 (1):135-145.
    Phenomenology is not the simple description of a fact, but rather the description of an intentional immanent moment, and it presents itself as a science of essences, and not of matter of facts. The Leib, the lived body of the phenomenological tradition, is not a generic corporeal reality, but rather an intentional subject, a transcendental reference point, on the base of which the connections between physical body and psychic body should be grasped. So, the reduction of empathy to mirror neurons (...)
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  43. Fact and Fiction in the Neuropsychology of Art.Roman Frigg & Catherine Howard - unknown
    The time honoured philosophical issue of how to resolve the mind/body problem has taken a more scientific turn of late. Instead of discussing issues of the soul and emotion and person and their reduction to a physical form, we now ask ourselves how well-understood cognitive and social concepts fit into the growing and changing field of neuropsychology. One of the many projects that have come out of this new scientific endeavour is Zaidel’s (2005) inquiry into the neuropsychological bases of art.
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  44. Signs of Disharmony: Newton's Opticks and the Artists.John Gage - 2008 - Perspectives on Science 16 (4):pp. 360-377.
    Newton’s Opticks was in no way directed at artists, but the great prestige of its author, as well as its proposal of possible principles of color-harmony, and its establishment of the circle as the most graphic format for illustrating color-relationships, ensured the book a place in the repertory of coloristic art-theory from the eighteenth century until the present day. And, although it was implicit rather than explicit in the Opticks, the idea of complementarity continued to fascinate painters well into the (...)
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  45. Beauty in the Living World.Alejandro Garcia-Rivera, Mark Graves & Carl Neumann - 2009 - Zygon 44 (2):243-263.
    Almost all admit that there is beauty in the natural world. Many suspect that such beauty is more than an adornment of nature. Few in our contemporary world suggest that this beauty is an empirical principle of the natural world itself and instead relegate beauty to the eye and mind of the beholder. Guided by theological and scientific insight, the authors propose that such exclusion is no longer tenable, at least in the data of modern biology and in our view (...)
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  46. Normative and Scientific Approaches to the Understanding and Evaluation of Art.Jonathan Gilmore - 2013 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (02):144-145.
    The psycho-historical framework proposes that appreciators' responses to art vary as a function of their sensitivity to its historical dimensions. However, the explanatory power of that framework is limited insofar as it assimilates relevantly different kinds of appreciation and insofar as it eschews a normative account of when a response succeeds in qualifying as an appreciation of art qua art.
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  47. Aesthetics as a Normative Science.Gordon Graham - 2014 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 75:249-264.
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  48. Art Forms and Science Concepts.George Haines - 1943 - Journal of Philosophy 40 (18):482-491.
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  49. Narrative, Fiction, Imagination.James R. Hamilton - 2010 - In Pokorny Kotatko (ed.), Fictionality-Possibility-Reality.
    Hamilton argues that narratives engage our imaginations not so much by having us pretend the events they depict are true or present as by having us engage in a kind of anticipation of events to come. The idea is that the grasp of a narratively structured presentation is explained in very much the same way any sequence of events, considered as a sequence, is grasped.
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  50. NOË, ALVA. Strange Tools: Art and Human Nature. New York: Hill and Wang, 2015, Xiii + 285 Pp., $28.00 Cloth. [REVIEW]Casey Haskins - 2016 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 74 (3):303-305.
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