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1 — 50 / 163
  1. added 2020-03-29
    Babies Rule! Niches, Scaffoldings, and the Development of an Aesthetic Capacity in Humans.Mariagrazia Portera - forthcoming - British Journal of Aesthetics:ayz064.
    Where does the human aesthetic come from? How does it develop? By introducing the notion of the ‘niche’ as a key term in an empirically and evolutionarily informed aesthetics, this paper aims to take a fresh look at these and similar questions. It also aims to shed new light on the development and functioning of the aesthetic capacity in humans and its trans-generational transmission. Drawing on recent research developments in evolutionary biology, developmental psychology, and cognitive sciences, I shall argue that (...)
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  2. added 2020-03-21
    Waltonian Perceptualism.Madeleine Ransom - 2020 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 78 (1):66-70.
    Kendall Walton’s project in ‘Categories of Art’ (1970) is to answer two questions. First, does the history of an artwork’s production determine its aesthetic properties? Second, how – if at all – should knowledge of the history of a work’s production influence our aesthetic judgments of its properties? While his answer to the first has been clearly understood, his answer to the second less so. Contrary to how many have interpreted Walton, such knowledge is not necessary for making aesthetic judgments; (...)
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  3. added 2020-03-17
    Seeking Salience in Engaging Artworks: A Short Story About Attention, Artistic Value, and Neuroscience (2018). The Arts and the Brain: Psychology and Physiology Beyond Pleasure, Progress in Brain Research 257: 437-453.William Seeley - 2018
    It has recently been suggested that research in neuroscience of art has failed to bring art into focus in the laboratory. Two general arguments are brought to bear in the regard. The common perceptual mechanisms argument observes that neuroscientists working within this field develop models to explain art relative to the ways that artworks are fine-tuned to the operations of perceptual systems. However, these perceptual explanations apply equally to how viewers come to recognize and understand art and nonart objects and (...)
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  4. added 2020-02-12
    The Artful Mind: Cognitive Science and the Riddle of Human Creativity.Phil Jenkins - 2008 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 66 (3):319-321.
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  5. added 2020-02-12
    This Is Your Brain on Music: The Science of a Human Obsession.Jenefer Robinson - 2008 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 66 (1):91-94.
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  6. added 2020-01-23
    Wittgenstein and Heidegger Against a Science of Aesthetics’.Andreas Vrahimis - 2020 - Estetika 57 (1):64-85.
    Wittgenstein’s and Heidegger’s objections against the possibility of a science of aesthetics were influential on different sides of the analytic/continental divide. Heidegger’s anti-scientism leads him to an alētheic view of artworks which precedes and exceeds any possible aesthetic reduction. Wittgenstein also rejects the relevance of causal explanations, psychological or physiological, to aesthetic questions. The main aim of this paper is to compare Heidegger with Wittgenstein, showing that: (a) there are significant parallels to be drawn between Wittgenstein’s and Heidegger’s anti-scientism about (...)
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  7. added 2020-01-19
    Using Philosophy of Perception in Aesthetics.Bence Nanay - 2015 - Aesthetic Investigations 1:174-180.
    Aesthetics is about ways of experiencing the world. But then if we apply the remarkably elaborate and sophisticated conceptual apparatus of philosophy of perception to questions in aesthetics, we can make real progress.
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  8. added 2020-01-14
    Art and Intimacy.Ellen Dissanayake - 2000 - University of Washington Press.
    To Ellen Dissanayake, the arts are biologically evolved propensities of human nature: their fundamental features helped early humans adapt to their environment and reproduce themselves successfully over generations. In Art and Intimacy she argues for the joint evolutionary origin of art and intimacy, what we commonly call love. It all begins with the human trait of birthing immature and helpless infants. To ensure that mothers find their demanding babies worth caring for, humans evolved to be lovable and to attune themselves (...)
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  9. added 2019-12-24
    The Biology of Art.Stephen Davies - forthcoming - British Journal of Aesthetics:ayz050.
    The Biology of ArtRICHARDSRICHARD A.Cambridge University Press. 2019. pp. 71. £15.00.
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  10. added 2019-11-25
    Wittgenstein and the Aesthetic Robot's Handicap.Julian Friedland - 2005 - Philosophical Investigations 28 (2):177-192.
    Ask most any cognitive scientist working today if a digital computational system could develop aesthetic sensibility and you will likely receive the optimistic reply that this remains an open empirical question. However, I attempt to show, while drawing upon the later Wittgenstein, that the correct answer is in fact available. And it is a negative a priori. It would seem, for example, that recent computational successes in textual attribution, most notably those of Donald Foster (famed finder of Ted Kazinski a.k.a. (...)
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  11. added 2019-07-07
    A Layered, Bounded, Integrated Approach to Research on the Arts Across Disciplines.Dominic McIver Lopes - 2019 - Leonardo:1-8.
    Cooperation among arts scholars is thought to be hampered by the division of research on the arts into two cultures, one scientific, one humanistic. This paper proposes an alternative model for research into the arts wherein multiple levels of explanation focussed on well-bounded phenomena integrate research across academic disciplines. Two case studies of research that fits the model are presented.
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  12. added 2019-06-18
    Is Psychology Relevant to Aesthetics?Sherri Irvin, Bence Nanay, Elisabeth Schellekens & Murray Smith - forthcoming - Estetika.
    A symposium on Bence Nanay, Aesthetics as Philosophy of Art and Murray Smith, Film, Art, and the Third Culture. Commentaries on the two books by two critics, followed by responses by the two book authors.
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  13. added 2019-06-06
    The Pulse Of Modernism: Experimental Physiology and Aesthetic Avant-Gardes Circa 1900.Robert Michael Brain - 2008 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 39 (3):393-417.
    When discussing the changing sense of reality around 1900 in the cultural arts the lexicon of early modernism reigns supreme. This essay contends that a critical condition for the possibility of many of the turn of the century modernist movements in the arts can be found in exchange of instruments, concepts, and media of representation between the sciences and the arts. One route of interaction came through physiological aesthetics, the attempt to ‘elucidate physiologically the nature of our Aesthetic feelings’ and (...)
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  14. added 2019-05-14
    Critical Neglect Of Ayn Rand's Theory Of Art.Michelle Kamhi & Louis Torres - 2000 - Journal of Ayn Rand Studies 1 (3):1-46.
    MICHELLE MARDER KAMHI and LOUIS TORRES analyze the scant critical and scholarly attention that has been devoted to Rand's aesthetic theory by other writers since its publication more than a quarter-century ago. They argue that, with few exceptions, Objectivists and non-Objectivists alike have tended to misinterpret and undervalue Rand's philosophy of art which has not been sufficiently distinguished from her theory of Romantic literature. They also point to infelicities of style that have impeded serious consideration of her ideas.
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  15. added 2019-05-06
    Consciousness Duplication And Our Capacity To Learn From Literary Fictions.Allison Mitchell - 2004 - Postgraduate Journal of Aesthetics 1 (1).
    Many of us share a strong intuition that fictional literature possesses cognitive value in the sense that it has the capacity to expand and/or clarify our knowledge or understanding of the world. If we agree that we learn something when we read and discuss certain texts, we may nevertheless find the form this learning takes to be anything but obvious.
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  16. added 2019-04-26
    Huston, Joseph P., MarcosNadal, FranciscoMora, LuigiF. Agnati, and CamiloJose Cela Conde, Eds. Art, Aesthetics, and the Brain. Oxford University Press, 2015, 544 Pp., $160.00 Cloth. [REVIEW]Javier Gomez‐Lavin - 2019 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 77 (2):219-222.
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  17. added 2019-02-05
    The Motivational Structure of Appreciation.Servaas van der Berg - 2019 - Philosophical Quarterly 69 (276):445-466.
    On a widely held view in aesthetics, appreciation requires disinterested attention. George Dickie famously criticized a version of this view championed by the aesthetic attitude theorists. I revisit his criticisms and extract an overlooked challenge for accounts that seek to characterize appreciative engagement in terms of distinctive motivation: at minimum, the motivational profile such accounts propose must make a difference to how appreciative episodes unfold over time. I then develop a proposal to meet this challenge by drawing an analogy between (...)
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  18. added 2018-11-06
    Boredom in Art.Andreas Elpidorou - 2017 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 40.
  19. added 2018-10-30
    Binding and Unbinding the Mondrian Stimulus.Whitney Davis - 2018 - British Journal of Aesthetics 58 (4):449-467.
    This paper considers the use of the ‘Mondrian Stimulus’, invented by Edwin H. Land of the Polaroid Corporation, in various investigations in the visual neuropsychology, the neuroaesthetics, and the social psychology of aesthetic response to works of visual art. What difference does it make—in the set-up of these investigations and in our interpretation of their putative results—that the Mondrian Stimulus might be taken to be a ‘real’ painting by the actual Dutch artist Piet Mondrian? How does the existence of a (...)
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  20. added 2018-06-14
    Poetic Opacity: How to Paint Things with Words.Jesse J. Prinz & Eric Mandelbaum - 2015 - In John Gibson (ed.), The Philosophy of Poetry. Oxford University Press. pp. 63-87.
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  21. added 2018-06-07
    The Poetics of Mind. [REVIEW]James Edwin Mahon - 1996 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 4:202-203.
    Review of Gibbs' book in which he argues against the twin assumptions that language is inherently literal, and that thought itself is literal. Metaphors, etc., are omnipresent in language, Gibbs argues, and the mind is inherently 'poetic', i.e., it engages in figurative thinking. For example, we conceptualize anger as "ANGER IS HEATED FLUID IN A CONTAINER" (p. 7), and as a result, that is how we talk about anger ('Bill is getting hot under the collar,' 'She blew up at me', (...)
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  22. added 2018-04-08
    Disgust’s Transparency.Filippo Contesi - 2016 - British Journal of Aesthetics 56 (4):347-354.
    The transparency thesis for disgust claims that what is disgusting in nature is always also disgusting in art. Versions of the thesis have been endorsed by, among others, Kant, Lessing, Mendelssohn, and, more recently, Arthur Danto, Carolyn Korsmeyer, and Jenefer Robinson. The present paper articulates and discusses different readings of the thesis. It concludes that the transparency thesis is false.
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  23. added 2018-04-08
    The Meanings of Disgusting Art.Filippo Contesi - 2016 - Essays in Philosophy 17 (1):68-94.
    It has been recently argued, contrary to the received eighteenth-century view, that disgust is compatible with aesthetic pleasure. According to such arguments, what allows this compatibility is the interest that art appreciators sometimes bestow on the cognitive content of disgust. On this view, the most interesting aspect of this cognitive content is identified in meanings connected with human mortality. The aim of this paper is to show that these arguments are unsuccessful.
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  24. added 2018-04-08
    Korsmeyer on Fiction and Disgust.Filippo Contesi - 2015 - British Journal of Aesthetics 55 (1):109-116.
    In Savoring Disgust, Carolyn Korsmeyer argues that disgust is peculiar amongst emotions, for it does not need any of the standard solutions to the so-called paradox of fiction. I argue that Korsmeyer’s arguments in support of the peculiarity of disgust with respect to the paradox of fiction are not successful.
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  25. added 2018-02-17
    The Meaning of the Body: Aesthetics of Human Understanding.Mark Johnson - 2007 - University of Chicago Press.
    In _The Meaning of the Body_, Mark Johnson continues his pioneering work on the exciting connections between cognitive science, language, and meaning first begun in the classic _Metaphors We Live By_. Johnson uses recent research into infant psychology to show how the body generates meaning even before self-consciousness has fully developed. From there he turns to cognitive neuroscience to further explore the bodily origins of meaning, thought, and language and examines the many dimensions of meaning—including images, qualities, emotions, and metaphors—that (...)
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  26. added 2018-02-02
    Toward a Science of Criticism: Aesthetic Values, Human Nature, and the Standard of Taste.Collier Mark - 2014 - In Cognition, Literature, and History. Routledge. pp. 229-242.
    The aesthetic skeptic maintains that it is futile to dispute about taste. One and the same work of art might appear beautiful to one person but repellent to another, and we have no reason to prefer one or another of these conflicting verdicts. Hume argues that the skeptic, however, moves too quickly. The crucial question is whether qualified critics will agree on their evaluations. And the skeptic fails to provide sufficient evidence that their verdicts will diverge. We have reason to (...)
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  27. added 2018-01-20
    Intersemiotic Translation and Transformational Creativity.Daniella Aguiar, Pedro Ata & Joao Queiroz - 2015 - Punctum 1 (2):11-21.
    In this article we approach a case of intersemiotic translation as a paradigmatic example of Boden’s ‘transformational creativity’ category. To develop our argument, we consider Boden’s fundamental notion of ‘conceptual space’ as a regular pattern of semiotic action, or ‘habit’ (sensu Peirce). We exemplify with Gertrude Stein’s intersemiotic translation of Cézanne and Picasso’s proto-cubist and cubist paintings. The results of Stein’s IT transform the conceptual space of modern literature, constraining it towards new patterns of semiosis. Our association of Boden’s framework (...)
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  28. added 2017-10-11
    A Defence of Experimental Philosophy in Aesthetics.Clotilde Torregrossa - 2017 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy:1-23.
    Although experimental philosophy is now over a decade old, it has only recently been introduced to the domain of philosophical aesthetics. So why is there already a need to defend it? Because, as I argue in this paper, we can anticipate the three main types of objection generally addressed to experimental philosophy and show that none of them concern experimental philosophers in aesthetics. I begin with some general considerations about experimental philosophy and its, sometimes conflicting, characteristics. This framework is designed (...)
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  29. added 2017-09-06
    How Transparent is Disgust?Filippo Contesi - 2017 - European Journal of Philosophy 25 (4):1810-1823.
    According to the so-called transparency thesis, what is disgusting in nature cannot but be disgusting in art. This paper critically discusses the arguments that have been put forward in favour of the transparency thesis, starting with Korsmeyer's (2011) sensory view of disgust. As an alternative, it offers an account of the relationship between disgust and representation that explains, at least in part, whatever truth there is in the transparency thesis. Such an account appeals to a distinction between object-centric and situation-centric (...)
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  30. added 2017-06-03
    Up the Nose of the Beholder? Aesthetic Perception in Olfaction as a Decision-Making Process.Ann-Sophie Barwich - 2017 - New Ideas in Psychology 47:157-165.
    Is the sense of smell a source of aesthetic perception? Traditional philosophical aesthetics has centered on vision and audition but eliminated smell for its subjective and inherently affective character. This article dismantles the myth that olfaction is an unsophisticated sense. It makes a case for olfactory aesthetics by integrating recent insights in neuroscience with traditional expertise about flavor and fragrance assessment in perfumery and wine tasting. My analysis concerns the importance of observational refinement in aesthetic experience. I argue that the (...)
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  31. added 2017-04-27
    NANAY, BENCE. Aesthetics as Philosophy of Perception. Oxford University Press, 2016, 192 Pp., $65.00 Cloth. [REVIEW]John Andrew Fisher - 2017 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 75 (2):210-214.
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  32. added 2017-03-10
    Hearing How Smooth It Looks: Selective Attention and Crossmodal Perception in the Arts.W. P. Seeley - 2012 - Essays in Philosophy 13 (2):8.
    A broad range of behavior is associated with crossmodal perception in the arts. Philosophical explanations of crossmodal perception often make reference to neuroscientific discussions of multisensory integration in selective attention. This research demonstrates that superior colliculus plays a regulative role in attention, integrating unique modality specific visual, auditory, and somatosensory spatial maps into a common spatial framework for action, and that motor skill, emotional salience, and semantic salience contribute to the integration of auditory, visual, and somatosensory information in ordinary perceptual (...)
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  33. added 2017-02-15
    Aesthetics as a Normative Science.Gordon Graham - 2014 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 75:249-264.
    It is well known that we owe the term ‘aesthetics’ in its philosophical sense to the 18th century German philosopher Alexander Baumgarten. The eighteenth century's interest in aesthetics, however, pre-dated the invention of the term. In 1725, Francis Hutcheson published an Inquiry into the Original of Our Idea of Beauty and Virtue. This may be said to be the first sustained and significant work in philosophical aesthetics as we now know it. Hutcheson's volume preceded Baumgarten's by 10 years, and within (...)
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  34. added 2017-02-07
    Towards a Sensorimotor Aesthetics of Performing Art.B. Calvo-Merino, C. Jola, D. E. Glaser & P. Haggard - 2008 - Consciousness and Cognition 17 (3):911-922.
    The field of neuroaesthetics attempts to identify the brain processes underlying aesthetic experience, including but not limited to beauty. Previous neuroaesthetic studies have focussed largely on paintings and music, while performing arts such as dance have been less studied. Nevertheless, increasing knowledge of the neural mechanisms that represent the bodies and actions of others, and which contribute to empathy, make a neuroaesthetics of dance timely. Here, we present the first neuroscientific study of aesthetic perception in the context of the performing (...)
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  35. added 2017-02-02
    How Much Art Can the Brain Take?Steven Pinker - manuscript
    As if that weren't enough of a puzzle, the more biologically frivolous and vain the activity, the more people exalt it. Art, literature, and music are thought to be not just pleasurable but noble. They are the mind's best work, what makes life worth living. Why do we pursue the biologically trivial and futile and experience them as sublime? To many educated people the question seems horribly philistine, even immoral. But it is unavoidable for anyone interested in the makeup of (...)
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  36. added 2017-01-27
    Neuroaesthetics.Anjan Chatterjee & Oshin Vartanian - 2014 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 18 (7):370-375.
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  37. added 2017-01-26
    The Artful Species: Aesthetics, Art, and Evolution.Stephen Davies - 2012 - Oxford University Press.
    Stephen Davies presents a fascinating exploration of the idea that art, and our aesthetic sensibilities more generally, should be understood as an element in human evolution. He asks: Do animals have aesthetics? Do our aesthetic preferences have prehistoric roots? Is art universal? What is the biological role of aesthetic and artistic behaviour?
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  38. added 2017-01-24
    Philip Ball on Neuroaesthetics.Simon van Rysewyk - 2013
  39. added 2017-01-24
    Neuroaesthetics: Range and Restrictions.Anjan Chatterjee - 2013 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (2):137-138.
    Bullot & Reber (B&R) should be commended for highlighting tensions between scientific aesthetics and art history. The question of how each tradition can learn from the other is timely. While I am sympathetic to their views, their diagnosis of the problem appears exaggerated and their solution partial. They underestimate the reach of scientific aesthetics while failing to identify its inherent restrictions.
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  40. added 2017-01-22
    Implicit Assumptions in Weed's Reflections on the Implicit Assumptions of Neuroaesthetics.Vlastimil Zuska - 2008 - Estetika 45 (2):198-201.
    A critical comment on Weed‘s Looking for Beauty in the Brain from Estetika 1/2008.
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  41. added 2017-01-21
    Neuroaesthetics Edited by Skov, Martin and Oshin Vartanian.Vincent Bergeron - 2010 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 68 (2):191-192.
  42. added 2017-01-21
    The Psychology of Art and the Evolution of the Conscious Brain.S. Davies - 2007 - British Journal of Aesthetics 47 (1):97-99.
  43. added 2017-01-20
    Neuroaesthetics.D. Keller - 2013 - British Journal of Aesthetics 53 (1):125-129.
    (No abstract is available for this citation).
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  44. added 2017-01-14
    Herman, David. Storytelling and the Sciences of Mind. The MIT Press, 2013, Xiv + 428 Pp., $45.00 Cloth. [REVIEW]László Kajtár - 2015 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 73 (3):367-369.
  45. added 2016-12-08
    How to Explain Pleasure.M. Matthen - 2014 - British Journal of Aesthetics 54 (4):477-481.
    Stephen Davies’ book The Artful Species is a nuanced and learned attempt to show how evolution does, and does not, account for the human capacity to produce and appreciate beautiful things. In this critical note, his approach to aesthetic pleasure is examined. Aesthetic pleasure, it is argued, is a state that encourages us to continue with our perceptual or intellectual engagement with something. Such pleasure displays a different profile from states that urge us to use an object to satisfy a (...)
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  46. added 2016-12-08
    Pictorial Colour: Aesthetics and Cognitive Science.Dominic McIver Lopes - 1999 - Philosophical Psychology 12 (4):415-428.
    The representation of color by pictures raises worthwhile questions for philosophers and psychologists. Moreover, philosophers and psychologists interested in answering these questions will benefit by paying attention to each other's work. Failure to recognize the potential for interdisciplinary cooperation can be attributed to tacit acceptance of the resemblance theory of pictorial color. I argue that this theory is inadequate, so philosophers of art have work to do devising an alternative. At the same time, if the resemblance theory is false, then (...)
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  47. added 2016-12-05
    Color Perception: Philosophical, Psychological, Artistic, and Computational Perspectives.Davis Steven (ed.) - 2000 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    Color has been studied for centuries, but has never been completely understood. Digital technology has recently sparked a burgeoning interdisciplinary interest in color. The fact that color is a quality of perception rather than a physical quality brings up a host of interesting questions of interest to both artists and scholars. This volume--the ninth in the Vancouver Studies in Cognitive Science series--brings together chapters by psychologists, philosophers, computer scientists, and artists to explore the nature of human color perception with the (...)
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  48. added 2016-08-31
    Review Of: "Strange Tools: Art and Human Nature" by Alva Noe. [REVIEW]Lauren R. Alpert - 2016 - American Society for Aesthetics Graduate E-Journal 8 (1):1-3.
    Strange Tools foregoes stolid conventions of professional philosophy, laudably broadening the book’s appeal to accommodate a popular audience. However, Noë’s manner of glossing over complex issues about art does not necessarily render these topics intelligible to philosophical novices. Instead, his oversimplifications will tend to confirm naïve notions that art is straightforward – a common misconception that a foray into philosophy of art ought to dispel, not corroborate.
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  49. added 2016-08-18
    Aesthetic Ineffability.Rafael De Clercq - 2000 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 7 (8-9):87-97.
    In this paper I argue that recent attempts at explaining aesthetic ineffability have been unsuccessful. Either they misrepresent what aesthetic ineffability consists in, or they leave important aspects of it unexplained. I then show how a more satisfying account might be developed, once a distinction is made between two kinds of awareness. -/- .
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  50. added 2016-07-28
    NOË, ALVA. Strange Tools: Art and Human Nature. New York: Hill and Wang, 2015, Xiii + 285 Pp., $28.00 Cloth. [REVIEW]Casey Haskins - 2016 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 74 (3):303-305.
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1 — 50 / 163