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  1. Art as Expression and Surface.Henry David Aiken - 1945 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 4 (2):87-95.
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  2. The Arousal and Expression of Emotion by Music.R. T. Allen - 1990 - British Journal of Aesthetics 30 (1):57-61.
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  3. The Particulars of Rapture: An Aesthetics of the Affects.Charles Altieri - 2003 - Cornell University Press.
    " "The Particulars of Rapture proposes treating affects in adverbial rather than in adjectival terms, emphasizing the way in which text and paintings shape ...
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  4. Christopher Norris, Platonism, Music and the Listener's Share.Peter Amato - 2010 - Journal of Critical Realism 9 (1):122-125.
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  5. Expression and Aesthetic Expression.Van Meter Ames - 1947 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 6 (2):172 - 179.
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  6. Art as Expression.Amevans Meter - 1944 - Ethics 54 (4):283-.
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  7. Expression and Aesthetic Expression.Meter Amevans - 1947 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 6 (2):172-179.
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  8. The Role of Aesthetic Emotion in R. G. Collingwood's Conception of Creative Activity.Douglas R. Anderson & Carl R. Hausman - 1992 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 50 (4):299-305.
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  9. Feeling and Emotion in Bosanquet's Aesthetics.Gabriel Apata - 2001 - Bradley Studies 7 (2):177-196.
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  10. Reason, Emotion, and Music: Towards a Common Structure for Arts, Sciences, and Philosophies, Based on a Conceptual Framework for the Description of Music.Leo Apostel, Herman Sabbe & Fernand J. Vandamme (eds.) - 1986 - Communication & Cognition.
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  11. Opaque Humours, Enlightened Emotions, and the Transparent Mind.Noga Arikha - 2007 - Res: Anthropology and Aesthetics 51:175-182.
  12. The Expression and Composition of Color.Rudolf Arnheim - 1998 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 56 (4):349-352.
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  13. From Function to Expression.Rudolf Arnheim - 1964 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 23 (1):29-41.
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  14. The Priority of Expression.Rudolf Arnheim - 1949 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 8 (2):106-109.
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  15. Emotion, Cognition, and the Value of Literature: The Case of Nietzsche's Genealogy.Antony Aumann - 2014 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 45 (2):182-195.
    Near the end of the Republic, Plato challenges defenders of poetry to explain how it “not only gives pleasure but is beneficial . . . to human life.”1 We sometimes hear a heightened version of this demand. Partisans not just of poetry but also of literature in general are asked to establish that the arts they celebrate possess a distinctive or unique value. In other words, they must show that poetry and literature are irreplaceable and that we would lose some (...)
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  16. Meaning in Music.Robert Austerlitz - 1983 - American Journal of Semiotics 2 (3):1-11.
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  17. Velasquez and the Postmodern Circle of Mirrors.Bernard Baars - 2008 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 15 (9):35-39.
    I agree with Uzi Awret that Diego Velasquez's seminal painting, Las Meninas, is an expression of self-consciousness in many different ways. But my first response was to the feeling tone Velasquez evokes in his work, which felt dark and rather grim to me. I think this painting may be a meditation on the mortification of the flesh, a theme that was surely familiar to Velasquez. It is a contemplation of human vanity. Self-consciousness is not just a cognitive act. The so-called (...)
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  18. Music and Emotion.Albert Balz - 1914 - Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 11 (9):236-244.
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  19. The Paradox of Horror: Fear as a Positive Emotion.Katerina Bantinaki - 2012 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 70 (4):2012.
  20. Pleurer À Chaudes Larmes de Crocodile.Carola Barbero - 2013 - Philosophiques 40 (1):45.
    Carola Barbero | : Je m’intéresse dans cet article aux émotions que nous ressentons lorsque nous lisons une oeuvre de fiction. Certains philosophes pensent que notre implication émotionnelle dans la fiction constitue un paradoxe, et implique soit une forme d’irrationalité, soit la participation à un jeu de « faire semblant ». Ici, je soutiendrai qu’une Théorie de l’Objet à la Meinong, en défendant une approche réaliste des émotions liées la fiction, permet de résoudre adéquatement ce paradoxe de la fiction. | (...)
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  21. Emotional Expression and Complexity in Music.Viorica Barbu-Iuraşcu - 2008 - Linguistic and Philosophical Investigations 7.
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  22. Review of “Strange Fits of Passion: Epistemologies of Emotion, Hume to Austen” by Adela Pinch. [REVIEW]S. Bartlett - 2000 - Consciousness and Emotion 1 (1):187-191.
  23. Vivid Abstractions: On the Role of Emotion Metaphors in Film Viewers' Search for Deeper Insight and Meaning.Anne Bartsch - 2010 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 34 (1):240-260.
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  24. How Does Art Express Emotion?Ismay Barwell - 1986 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 45 (2):175-181.
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  25. Music for the Young at Heart.Bruce Baugh - 1995 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 53 (1):81-83.
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  26. L'émotion Musicale.H. Beaunis - 1918 - Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 86:353 - 369.
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  27. Music, Value and the Passions.David N. Beauregard - 1996 - International Philosophical Quarterly 36 (2):247-249.
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  28. Suspense.Donald Beecher - 2007 - Philosophy and Literature 31 (2):255-279.
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  29. The Arousal Theory Again?Allan Beever - 1998 - British Journal of Aesthetics 38 (1):82-90.
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  30. Expression and Emotion in Music.Ann Elizabeth Behrend - 1989 - U.M.I.
    How are human moods and emotions attributed to musical works of art? Since artworks are not sentient, critical descriptions and interpretations of them as expressing emotions cannot be literal. Theories of musical works' expressive features and the status of emotive criticism divide into two basic types: Expressionist and Formalist. Expressionists link expressive qualities to the artist's intentions or emotions in creating the work or to the appreciator's feelings in experiencing it. These features reveal the work's meaning, and emotive criticism contributes (...)
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  31. "The Psychology of Expression": Sylvia Honkavaara. [REVIEW]John Beloff - 1962 - British Journal of Aesthetics 2 (1):79.
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  32. Music and Religion: Psychological Perspectives and Their Limits.Jacob A. Belzen - 2013 - Archive for the Psychology of Religion 35 (1):1-29.
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  33. Sweet Anticipation: Music and the Psychology of Expectation by Huron, David.William Benjamin - 2007 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 65 (3):333–335.
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  34. Hearing and Seeing Musical Expression.Vincent Bergeron & Dominic Mciver Lopes - 2009 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 78 (1):1-16.
    Everybody assumes that musical performances are sonic events and that their expressive properties are sonic properties. This paper discusses recent findings in the psychology of music perception that show that visual information combines with auditory information in the perception of musical expression. The findings show at the very least that arguments are needed for and. If music expresses what we think it does, then its expressive properties may be visual as well as sonic; and if its expressive properties are purely (...)
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  35. Beauty, Embodiment, and Art.Arthur Berndtson - 1960 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 21 (1):50-61.
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  36. Musical Emotions in the Context of Narrative Film.Matthew A. Bezdek & Richard J. Gerrig - 2008 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (5):578-578.
    Juslin & Vll's (J&V's) discussions of evaluative conditioning and episodic memory focus on circumstances in which music becomes associated with arbitrary life events. However, analyses of film music suggest that viewers experience consistent pairings between types of music and types of narrative content. Researchers have demonstrated that the emotional content of film music has a major impact on viewers' emotional experiences of a narrative.
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  37. Affective Spectra, Synchronization, and Motion: Aspects of the Emotional Response to Music.Jamshed J. Bharucha & Meagan Curtis - 2008 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (5):579-579.
    We propose three extensions of the theory developed by Juslin & Vll (J&V). First, motion should be considered as an additional mechanism. Second, synchronization plays a role in eliciting emotion. And, third, the spectrum of musical affect or feelings is denser and broader than the spectrum of emotions, suggesting an expansion of the scope of the theory beyond emotions.
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  38. Why Music Moves Us.Jeanette Bicknell - 2009 - Palgrave-Macmillan.
    The tears of Odysseus -- History : music gives voice to the ineffable -- Tears, chills, and broken bones -- The music itself -- Explaining strong emotional responses to music I -- Explaining strong emotional responses to music II -- The sublime, revisited -- Conclusion : values.
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  39. Can Music Convey Semantic Content? A Kantian Approach.Jeanette Bicknell - 2002 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 60 (3):253–261.
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  40. Music and the Emotions.Paul Boghossian - 2007 - In Kathleen Stock (ed.), Philosophers on Music: Experience, Meaning, and Work. Oxford University Press. pp. 117.
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  41. Explaining Musical Experience.Paul Boghossian - 2007 - In Kathleen Stock (ed.), Philosophers on Music: Experience, Meaning, and Work. Oxford University Press.
    1. I start with the observation that we often respond to a musical performance with emotion -- even if it is just the performance of a piece of absolute music, unaccompanied by text, title or programme. We can be exhilarated after a Rossini overture brought off with subtlety and panache; somber and melancholy after Furtlanger’s performance of the slow movement of the Eroica. And so forth. These emotions feel like the real thing to me – or anyway very close to (...)
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  42. Footnotes to a Fairytale a Study of the Nature of Expression in the Arts.William J. Bonville - 1979
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  43. Fiction and Emotion: A Study in Aesthetics and the Philosophy of Mind.Bijoy H. Boruah - 1988 - Oxford University Press.
    Why do people respond emotionally to works of fiction they know are make-believe? Boruah tackles this question, which is fundamental aesthetics and literary studies, from a totally new perspective. Bringing together the various answers that have been offered by philosophers from Aristotle to Roger Scruton, he shows that while some philosophers have denied any rational basis to our emotional responses to fiction, others have argued that the emotions evoked by fiction are not real emotions at all. In response to this, (...)
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  44. On the Nature of Æsthetic Emotion.Bernard Bosanquet - 1894 - Mind 3 (10):153-166.
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  45. Art and Human Emotions. Par Egon Weiner. Springfield, Charles C. Thomas, 1975. 90 P.Guy Bouchard - 1977 - Dialogue 16 (4):754-755.
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  46. Melancholy as an Aesthetic Emotion.Emily Brady & Arto Haapala - unknown
    In this article, we want to show the relevance and importance of melancholy as an aesthetic emotion. Melancholy often plays a role in our encounters with art works, and it is also present in some of our aesthetic responses to the natural environment. Melancholy invites aesthetic considerations to come into play not only in well-defined aesthetic contexts but also in everyday situations that give reason for melancholy to arise. But the complexity of melancholy, the fact that it is fascinating in (...)
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  47. The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Emotion.M. Brady - 2011 - British Journal of Aesthetics 51 (2):226-228.
    (No abstract is available for this citation).
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  48. Cézanne Et l'Expression de L'Espace.Liliane Brion-Guerry - 1968 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 27 (1):119-119.
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  49. Emotion and Sentiment.C. D. Broad - 1954 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 13 (2):203-214.
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  50. Fictions, Feelings, and Emotions.Stuart Brock - 2007 - Philosophical Studies 132 (2):211 - 242.
    Many philosophers suggest (1) that our emotional engagement with fiction involves participation in a game of make-believe, and (2) that what distinguishes an emotional game from a dispassionate game is the fact that the former activity alone involves sensations of physiological and visceral disturbances caused by our participation in the game. In this paper I argue that philosophers who accept (1) should reject (2). I then illustrate how this conclusion illuminates various puzzles in aesthetics and the philosophy of mind.
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