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1 — 50 / 572
  1. added 2020-05-19
    Aesthetic Reasons and the Demands They (Do Not) Make.Daniel Whiting - forthcoming - Philosophical Quarterly.
    What does the aesthetic ask of us? What claims do the aesthetic features of the objects and events in our environment make on us? My answer in this paper is: that depends. Aesthetic reasons can only justify feelings – they cannot demand them. A corollary of this is that there are no aesthetic obligations to feel, only permissions. However, I argue, aesthetic reasons can demand actions – they do not merely justify them. A corollary of this is that there are (...)
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  2. added 2020-04-29
    An Emotion Regulation Account of the Paradox of Fiction.Matthieu Koroma - manuscript
    The paradox of fiction tackles how we can be considered as rational while having emotions towards fictional and thus non-existing events. I aim to show that the different philosophical positions on this issue can be reconciled within the emotion regulation framework. This approach refines the concept of emotion, defining it as a sequence of distinct regulated processes. I argue that the philosophical solutions that have been proposed to solve the paradox can be framed as different regulation mechanisms occuring at each (...)
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  3. added 2020-03-06
    Awe and Wonder in Scientific Practice: Implications for the Relationship Between Science and Religion.Helen De Cruz - 2020 - Issues in Science and Theology: Nature – and Beyond.
    This paper examines the role of awe and wonder in scientific practice. Drawing on evidence from psychological research and the writings of scientists and science communicators, I argue that awe and wonder play a crucial role in scientific discovery. They focus our attention on the natural world, encourage open-mindedness, diminish the self (particularly feelings of self-importance), help to accord value to the objects that are being studied, and provide a mode of understanding in the absence of full knowledge. I will (...)
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  4. added 2020-03-05
    Aesthetic Emotions.Jenefer Robinson - 2020 - The Monist 103 (2):205-222.
    This paper investigates what I call aesthetic emotions in the “traditional” sense going back to Burke and Kant. According to Kant, aesthetic pleasure is disinterested, and so maybe for Kant aesthetic emotions would be too, for Kant, but emotions by their very nature cannot be disinterested. After dismissing the idea that aesthetic emotions are a special kind of distanced emotions or refined emotions, I extract from the writings of Clive Bell, Peter Kivy, and Peter Lamarque the view that aesthetic emotions (...)
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  5. added 2020-03-05
    Aesthetic Emotions Reconsidered.Joerg Fingerhut & Jesse J. Prinz - 2020 - The Monist 103 (2):223-239.
    We define aesthetic emotions as emotions that underlie the evaluative assessment of artworks. They are separated from the wider class of art-elicited emotions. Aesthetic emotions historically have been characterized as calm, as lacking specific patterns of embodiment, and as being a sui generis kind of pleasure. We reject those views and argue that there is a plurality of aesthetic emotions contributing to praise. After presenting a general account of the nature of emotions, we analyze twelve positive aesthetic emotions in four (...)
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  6. added 2020-02-19
    Interpreting the Personal: Expression and the Formation of Feelings.Sue Campbell - 1997 - Ithaca: Cornell University Press.
  7. added 2020-02-12
    Sweet Anticipation: Music and the Psychology of Expectation.William Benjamin - 2007 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 65 (3):333-335.
  8. added 2020-02-11
    Philosophy, Music and Emotion.Constantijn Koopman - 2003 - Mind 112 (448):759-762.
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  9. added 2020-01-05
    Art and Intimacy.Ellen Dissanayake - 2000 - University of Washington Press.
    o Ellen Dissanayake, the arts are biologically evolved propensities of human nature: their fundamental features helped early humans adapt to their environment and reproduce themselves successfully over generations. In Art and Intimacy she argues for the joint evolutionary origin of art and intimacy, what we commonly call love. It all begins with the human trait of birthing immature and helpless infants. To ensure that mothers find their demanding babies worth caring for, humans evolved to be lovable and to attune themselves (...)
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  10. added 2019-12-10
    Estética, sensibilidades y emoción.Carlos Eduardo Sanabria Bohórquez, Mariana Sáez & Mariana del Mármol - 2018 - La Plata, Buenos Aires Province, Argentina: Universidad Nacional de la Plata.
    La Red de Antropología de y desde los Cuerpos, La Red Colombiana de Investigadores Sobre “El Cuerpo” y las siguientes Universidades sede: Universidad Distrital Francisco José de Caldas, Corporación Universitaria Minuto de Dios Uniminuto, Pontifica Universidad Javeriana, Universidad Jorge Tadeo Lozano, Universidad Pedagógica Nacional, fueron las anfitrionas del II Encuentro Latinoamericano de Investigadores/as sobre Cuerpos y Corporalidades en las Culturas realizado del 3 al 7 de octubre de 2015 en Bogotá, Colombia, el cual se propuso dar a conocer y discutir (...)
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  11. added 2019-10-28
    How to Play the Platonic Flute: Mimêsis and Truth in Republic X.Gene Fendt - 2018 - In Heather L. Reid & Jeremy C. DeLong (eds.), The Many Faces of Mimēsis: Selected Essays from the Third Interdisciplinary Symposium on the Heritage of Western Greece,. Sioux City, IA, USA: Parnassos Press. pp. 37-48.
    The usual interpretation of Republic 10 takes it as Socrates’ multilevel philosophical demonstration of the untruth and dangerousness of mimesis and its required excision from a well ordered polity. Such readings miss the play of the Platonic mimesis which has within it precisely ordered antistrophes which turn its oft remarked strophes perfectly around. First, this argument, famously concluding to the unreliability of image-makers for producing knowledge begins with two images—the mirror (596e) and the painter. I will show both undercut the (...)
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  12. added 2019-10-15
    Inanimation: A Network of Feeling and Perception.Matteo Ravasio - 2020 - Analysis 80 (2):301-309.
    We often use terms primarily concerned with the description of inanimate objects in order to characterize psychological states or dispositions, without being able to specify the connection between the two uses. I call this inanimation. In this paper, I propose an account of inanimation and of its connection to expressiveness.
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  13. added 2019-10-14
    Emma's Pensive Meditations.Cynthia Freeland - 2018 - In Eva Dadlez (ed.), Jane Austen's Emma: Philosophical Perspectives. New York, USA: Oxford University Press. pp. 55-83.
  14. added 2019-09-25
    What Is Expressed When Emotions Are Expressed in Art?Sabine A. Döring - 2019 - Grazer Philosophische Studien 96 (3):361-380.
    The author argues for a Collingwoodian claim: if an emotion is expressed in art, it is not a content which exists prior to, and independent of, its expression. Artistic emotion expressions rather clarify and complete emotions. The autor backs up this claim by Musil’s Lewinian theory of emotion which displays significant parallels to recent Enactivist Theories of Emotion: it states that embodiment in action is necessary in any case in order for nonspecific dispositions to emotions to shape and consolidate into (...)
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  15. added 2019-09-10
    Movies, Narration and the Emotions.Noel Carroll - 2019 - In Christina Rawls, Diana Neiva & Steven Gouveia (eds.), Philosophy and Film: Bridging Divides. Routledge. pp. 209-221.
    In “Movies, Narrative and Emotion” there is an attempt to suggest the ways in which a certain form of narrative organization, to which we can call “erotetic narration,” This can be co-ordinated with the emotional address of the motion picture in terms of what can be called “criterial prefocusing.” On this view, the primary way in which the emotions are engaged is character-directed, the protagonist’s goals providing grounds which generate the narrative questions that the movie goes on to answer.
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  16. added 2019-08-14
    Art and Selfhood: A Kierkegaardian Account.Antony Aumann - 2019 - Lanham, MD 20706, USA: Lexington Books.
    Drawing on insights from Søren Kierkegaard, Art and Selfhood: A Kierkegaardian Account defends the idea that art matters in our society today because it can play a pivotal role in helping us become better and more authentic versions of ourselves.
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  17. added 2019-08-13
    Starting From the Muses: Engaging Moral Imagination Through Memory’s Many Gifts.Guy Axtell - forthcoming - In Brian Robinson (ed.), The Moral Psychology of Amusements. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield.
    In Greek mythology the Muses –patron goddesses of fine arts, history, humanities, and sciences– are tellingly portrayed as the daughters of Zeus and Mnemosyne, the goddess Memory, who is of the race of Titans, older still than Zeus and other Olympian deities. The relationship between memory and such fields as epic poetry, history, music and dance is easily recognizable to moderns. But bards/poets like Homer and Hesiod, who began oral storytelling by “invoking the Muses” with their audience, knew well that (...)
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  18. added 2019-08-13
    Tragedy Beyond Pity: A Nietzschean Appraisal of Exorcism.Jeremy Killian - 2018 - Eugene O'Neill Review 2 (39):250-269.
    Eugene O'Neill's discarded one-act play Exorcism, a biographical work depicting his suicide attempt in 1911, was described by reviewers at the time as a tragedy, yet it seems strange to characterize the play this way. I argue that from an interpretive point of view, especially focused in Nietzsche's critique of pity, this play can be rightly interpreted as a tragedy. Specific references to Thus Spake Zarathustra and Nietzsche's doctrine of Eternal Return seem to be prevalent in the play, and although (...)
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  19. added 2019-07-31
    Is Musical Emotion An Illusion?Muk Yan Wong - 2010 - Postgraduate Journal of Aesthetics 7 (1):24-36.
    The power of music to arouse garden-variety emotions has attracted attention from musicians, psychologists, and philosophers over decades. Despite its widespread acknowledgement, there is no agreement on how pure music with no propositional content can induce such a wide range of emotions. Jenefer Robinson coined this 1 problemthepuzzleofmusicalemotion. Inthisessay,Iwillfirstdiscusswhymusical emotion is a puzzle. Then, Jesse Prinz’s perceptual theory of emotion and his solution 2 to the puzzle will be discussed. Prinz regards an emotion as an embodied appraisal, and a musical (...)
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  20. added 2019-07-22
    On Liking Aesthetic Value.Keren Gorodeisky - forthcoming - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research.
    According to tradition, aesthetic value is non-contingently connected to a certain feeling of liking or pleasure. Is that true? Two answers are on offer in the field of aesthetics today: 1. The Hedonist answers: Yes, aesthetic value is non-contingently connected to pleasure insofar as this value is constituted and explained by the power of its possessors to please (under standard conditions). 2. The Non-Affectivist answers: No. At best, pleasure is contingently related to aesthetic value. The aim of this paper is (...)
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  21. added 2019-07-22
    The Authority of Pleasure.Keren Gorodeisky - 2019 - Noûs 53 (4):1-22.
    The aim of the paper is to reassess the prospects of a widely neglected affective conception of the aesthetic evaluation and appreciation of art. On the proposed picture, the aesthetic evaluation and appreciation of art are non-contingently constituted by a particular kind of pleasure. Artworks that are valuable qua artworks merit, deserve, and call for a certain pleasure, the same pleasure that reveals (or at least purports to reveal) them to be valuable in the way that they are, and constitutes (...)
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  22. added 2019-07-09
    An Empathic Eye.Dominic McIver Lopes - 2011 - In Amy Coplan & Peter Goldie (eds.), Empathy. Philosophical and Psychological Perspectives. Oxford: Oxford Univerity Press. pp. 118-133.
    What you see can shape how you feel, and the route from seeing to feeling sometimes involves empathy – as you might empathize with a woman you see grieving the death of her child. But empathy also comes from what you see in pictures. Bellini's Pieta? is one among many paintings, drawings, prints, and photographs that evoke empathy – and are designed to do so. Going further, it seems that episodes of empathy triggered by pictures can help build up a (...)
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  23. added 2019-06-06
    Emotion, Cognition, and the Value of Literature: The Case of Nietzsche's Genealogy. Aumann - 2014 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 45 (2):182.
    Near the end of the Republic, Plato challenges defenders of poetry to explain how it “not only gives pleasure but is beneficial . . . to human life.”1 We sometimes hear a heightened version of this demand. Partisans not just of poetry but also of literature in general are asked to establish that the arts they celebrate possess a distinctive or unique value. In other words, they must show that poetry and literature are irreplaceable and that we would lose some (...)
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  24. added 2019-06-06
    Narrative, Emotion, and Insight. Edited by Noël Carroll and John Gibson. (Pennsylvania State University Press, 2011. Pp. Ix +188. Price US$64.95.).Damien Freeman - 2013 - Philosophical Quarterly 63 (251):405-407.
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  25. added 2019-06-06
    Constraints on Manipulations of Emotions by Music: A Critique of Tom Cochrane’s Assumptions.Vladimir J. Konečni - 2012 - Philosophy Today 56 (3):327-332.
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  26. added 2019-06-06
    Percevoir L’Expression Émotionnelle Dans les Objets Inanimés : L’Exemple du Vin: Dialogue.Cain Todd - 2012 - Dialogue 51 (1):129-139.
    ABSTRACT: Amongst inanimate objects, it is generally accepted that at least some art forms, such as music and painting, are capable of being genuinely expressive of emotion, even though it is difficult to understand exactly how. In contrast, although expressive properties can be attributed to non-artworks, such as natural objects or wine, it has often been claimed that such objects cannot be genuinely expressive. Focussing on wine, I argue that once we understand properly the nature of expressiveness, if we allow (...)
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  27. added 2019-06-06
    Philosophers on Music: Experience, Meaning, and Work: Book Reviews. [REVIEW]Saam Trivedi - 2009 - British Journal of Aesthetics 49 (1):91-93.
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  28. added 2019-06-06
    Drawing Distinctions. The Varieties of Graphic Expression: Book Reviews. [REVIEW]Michael Podro - 2008 - British Journal of Aesthetics 48 (3):346-347.
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  29. added 2019-06-06
    The Use of Imagination, Emotion, and the Will in a Medieval Classic.Lawrence F. Hundersmarck - 2003 - Logos: A Journal of Catholic Thought and Culture 6 (2):46-62.
  30. added 2019-06-06
    Feeling and Emotion in Bosanquet’s Aesthetics.Gabriel Apata - 2001 - Bradley Studies 7 (2):177-196.
    In this paper I want to discuss Bernard Bosanquet’s idea of the nature and role of feeling and emotion in art.
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  31. added 2019-06-06
    Schopenhauer, Philosophy and the Arts.Dale Jacquette (ed.) - 1996 - Cambridge University Press.
    This collection brings together thirteen essays by some of the most respected contemporary scholars of Schopenhauer's aesthetics from a wide spectrum of philosophical perspectives. The dynamics of the empirical will and Will as a thing-in-itself in the interplay of Schopenhauer's metaphysics and philosophy of fine art has important implications for the freedom, salvation and tragic suffering of the artist, the representation of Platonic Ideas in art, and the role of artistic inspiration, emotion and aesthetic pleasure in the beautiful and sublime. (...)
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  32. added 2019-06-06
    Expression of Emotion and Artistic Truth: R. G. Collingwood’s Debt to the Aesthetics of John Ruskin.Heta Häyry - 1994 - Idealistic Studies 24:43.
    In his book The Principles of Art Robin George Collingwood presents a theory of art as the expression of emotion. The connection between his view and the theories of the Italian neo-idealists Benedetto Croce and Giovanni Gentile is both well known and well documented. What seems to be less known, however, is the intellectual link R. G. Collingwood’s father, William Gershom Collingwood, formed between his son and John Ruskin, the great Victorian essayist, critic and reformer. There are some references in (...)
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  33. added 2019-06-06
    Expression of Emotion and Artistic Truth: R. G. Collingwood’s Debt to the Aesthetics of John Ruskin.Heta Häyry - 1994 - Idealistic Studies 24 (1):43-52.
    In his book The Principles of Art Robin George Collingwood presents a theory of art as the expression of emotion. The connection between his view and the theories of the Italian neo-idealists Benedetto Croce and Giovanni Gentile is both well known and well documented. What seems to be less known, however, is the intellectual link R. G. Collingwood’s father, William Gershom Collingwood, formed between his son and John Ruskin, the great Victorian essayist, critic and reformer. There are some references in (...)
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  34. added 2019-06-06
    Escher And Parmigianino: A STUDY IN PARADOX.Jane Duran - 1993 - British Journal of Aesthetics 33 (3):239-245.
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  35. added 2019-06-06
    Pitiful Responses To Music.Aaron Ridley - 1993 - British Journal of Aesthetics 33 (1):72-74.
  36. added 2019-06-06
    Music and the Emotions: The Philosophical Theories.Malcolm Budd - 1985 - Routledge.
    It has often been claimed, and frequently denied, that music derives some or all of its artistic value from the relation in which it stands to the emotions. This book presents and subjects to critical examination the chief theories about the relationship between the art of music and the emotions.
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  37. added 2019-06-06
    The Search Meaning: Mathematics, Music, and Ritual.Frits Staal - 1984 - American Journal of Semiotics 2 (4):1-57.
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  38. added 2019-06-06
    Emotion in Greek Tragedy. [REVIEW]Michael Lloyd - 1984 - The Classical Review 34 (2):198-199.
  39. added 2019-06-05
    Morally Corrupt Aesthetic Pleasure? Neuber - 2014 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 48 (1):90.
    It may be surprising that the paradox of tragedy is worthy of further attention.1 After all, there are good reasons to assume that at least several of its presuppositions are problematic. Furthermore, it has been questioned whether the paradox forms a problem of its own or if it should be discussed as an issue within the field of pleasurable negative emotions.2 Reasonable objections seem no less important, which regard it as far from self-evident that rational agents merely seek pleasure or (...)
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  40. added 2019-05-22
    An Aesthetic of Horror Film Music.Ka Chung Lorraine Yeung - 2019 - Film and Philosophy 23:159-178.
    In this paper I develop an aesthetic of horror film music based on the film sound theorist Kevin Donnelly's "direct access thesis". This states that horror film scores have the power to provide "direct accesses" to the bodies of an audience; they "produce bodily sensations, excite (mainly negative) emotions and insert in the audience "frames of mind and attitudes...much like a direct injection". I first argue that two dominant theories in the field, namely, the culturalist theory of film music and (...)
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  41. added 2019-05-15
    Monuments as Commitments: How Art Speaks to Groups and How Groups Think in Art.C. Thi Nguyen - 2019 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 100 (4):971-994.
    Art can be addressed, not just to individuals, but to groups. Art can even be part of how groups think to themselves – how they keep a grip on their values over time. I focus on monuments as a case study. Monuments, I claim, can function as a commitment to a group value, for the sake of long-term action guidance. Art can function here where charters and mission statements cannot, precisely because of art’s powers to capture subtlety and emotion. In (...)
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  42. added 2019-03-28
    Musik, Emotion Und Empathie.Anja Berninger - 2018 - In Susanne Schmetkamp & Magdalena Zorn (eds.), Variationen des Mitfühlens. Empathie in Musik, Literatur, Film und Sprache. Mainz, Stuttgart: Franz Steiner Verlag. pp. 53-64.
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  43. added 2019-02-20
    Emotion, Fiction and Rationality.Fabrice Teroni - 2019 - British Journal of Aesthetics 59 (2):113-128.
    The aim of this article is to explore in a systematic way the rationality of emotions elicited when we engage with works of fiction. I first lay out the approach to the emotions on which my discussion is premised. Next, I concentrate on two facets of emotional rationality—the first pertains to the relation between emotions and the mental states on which they are based, the second to the relation between emotions and the judgements and behaviour they elicit. These observations about (...)
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  44. added 2019-01-28
    The Stability of Laughter. The Problem of Joy in Modernist Literature.James Nikopoulos - 2019 - New York, USA: Routledge.
    A "sad and corrupt" age, a period of "crisis" and "upheaval"—what T.S. Eliot famously summed up as "the panorama of futility and anarchy which is contemporary history." Modernism has always been characterized by its self-conscious sense of suffering. Why, then, was it so obsessed with laughter? From Baudelaire, Nietzsche, Bergson and Freud to Pirandello, Beckett, Hughes, Barnes, and Joyce, no moment in cultural history has written about laughter this much. James Nikopoulos investigates modernity’s paradoxical relationship with mirth. Why was the (...)
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  45. added 2019-01-02
    Toward a Science of Criticism: Aesthetic Values, Human Nature, and the Standard of Taste.Collier Mark - 2014 - In Cognition, Literature, and History. Routledge. pp. 229-242.
    The aesthetic skeptic maintains that it is futile to dispute about taste. One and the same work of art might appear beautiful to one person but repellent to another, and we have no reason to prefer one or another of these conflicting verdicts. Hume argues that the skeptic, however, moves too quickly. The crucial question is whether qualified critics will agree on their evaluations. And the skeptic fails to provide sufficient evidence that their verdicts will diverge. We have reason to (...)
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  46. added 2018-11-27
    Imagining the Truth: An Account of Tragic Pleasure.James Shelley - 2003 - In Matthew Kieran & Dominic McIver Lopes (eds.), Imagination, Philosophy, and the Arts. London and New York: pp. 177-185.
    The problem of tragedy is the problem of explaining why tragedy gives us the pleasure that it does, given that it has the content that it has. I propose a series of constraints that any adequate solution to the problem must satisfy. Then I develop a solution to the problem that satisfies those constraints. But I do not claim that the solution I develop uniquely satisfies the constraints I propose. I aim merely to narrow the field of contending solutions, and (...)
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  47. added 2018-11-06
    Boredom in Art.Andreas Elpidorou - 2017 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 40.
  48. added 2018-10-30
    Art and Painful Emotion.Matthew Strohl - 2019 - Philosophy Compass 14 (1):e12558.
    This essay updates Aaron Smuts', 2009 Philosophy Compass piece, “Art and Negative Affect” in light of recent work on the topic. The “paradox of painful art” is the general problem of how it is possible to enjoy or value experiences of art that involve painful emotions. It encompasses both the paradox of tragedy and the paradox of horror. Section 2 lays out a taxonomy of solutions to the paradox of painful art and argues that we should opt for a pluralistic (...)
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  49. added 2018-09-11
    Thinking and Feeling in Actual Idealism.J. R. M. Wakefield - 2018 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 26 (4):782-801.
    In La filosofia dell’arte, Giovanni Gentile assigned a prominent new role to the sentiments. This change struck some critics as a major departure from the earlier, classic accounts of actual idealism, in which Gentile argued that thought and language comprise the entirety of reality. Sentiments do not fit cleanly into a theory so narrowly concerned with thought and thinking. Their introduction, runs the objection, only compounds certain existing ambiguities in Gentile’s conception of the relation between mind and world. This article (...)
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  50. added 2018-09-09
    The Affective Experience of Aesthetic Properties.Kris Goffin - 2019 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 100 (1):283-300.
    It is widely agreed upon that aesthetic properties, such as grace, balance, and elegance, are perceived. I argue that aesthetic properties are experientially attributed to some non‐perceptible objects. For example, a mathematical proof can be experienced as elegant. In order to give a unified explanation of the experiential attribution of aesthetic properties to both perceptible and non‐perceptible objects, one has to reject the idea that aesthetic properties are perceived. I propose an alternative view: the affective account. I argue that the (...)
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