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  1. added 2019-07-29
    Individuality and Mortality in the Philosophy of Portrait Painting: Simmel, Rousseau, and Melanie Klein.Byron Davies - 2018 - Contrastes. Revista Internacional de Filosofia 23 (3):27-52.
    This paper explores some connections between depictions of mortality in portrait-painting and philosophical (and psychoanalytic) treatments of our need to be recognized by others. I begin by examining the connection that Georg Simmel makes in his philosophical study of Rembrandt between that artist’s capacity for depicting his portrait subjects as non-repeatable individuals and his depicting them as mortal, or such as to die. After noting that none of Simmel’s explanations of the tragic character of Rembrandt’s portrait subjects seems fully satisfactory, (...)
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  2. added 2019-03-04
    The Shadow of the Sickness Unto Death.Frank Scalambrino - 2016 - In Kevin S. Decker, David R. Koepsell & Robert Arp (eds.), Breaking Bad and Philosophy. New York, NY, USA: pp. 47-62.
    This chapter philosophically examines the transformation of “Walter White” into “Heisenberg,” as depicted in the television series Breaking Bad, in terms of Søren Kierkegaard’s “stages of life” and Carl Jung’s “process of individuation.” Though Walt’s transformation is an oft-discussed topic regarding Breaking Bad, there has yet to appear in the philosophical literature an examination of this transformation in terms of Kierkegaard and Jung. Such an examination is important since it also addresses a number of the questions regarding the shift in (...)
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  3. added 2018-09-07
    Masks and Monsters: On the Transformative Power of Art.Marina Marren - 2018 - Pli: The Warwick Journal of Philosophy 29:102-112.
    Drawing on texts in psychology, philosophy, and literature the paper argues that art avails us of a distance from ourselves. Art has a potential to change our perspective on monstrosity and to make us question our moral categories and presuppositions. The study focuses on a single painting by Paul Gavarni, Two Pierrots Looking into a Box (1852), which I have discovered holds two images in one representation. I turn to Gavarni's work in order to prompt a literal gestalt shift in (...)
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  4. added 2018-08-13
    On Not Explaining Anything Away.Eran Guter & Craig Fox - 2018 - In Gabriele M. Mras, Paul Weingartner & Bernhard Ritter (eds.), Philosophy of Logic and Mathematics, Contributions to the 41st International Wittgenstein Symposium. Kirchberg am Wechsel, Austria: Austrian Ludwig Wittgenstein Society. pp. 52-54.
    In this paper we explain Wittgenstein’s claim in a 1933 lecture that “aesthetics like psychoanalysis doesn’t explain anything away.” The discussions of aesthetics are distinctive: Wittgenstein gives a positive account of the relationship between aesthetics and psychoanalysis, as contrasted with psychology. And we follow not only his distinction between cause and reason, but also between hypothesis and representation, along with his use of the notion of ideals as facilitators of aesthetic discourse. We conclude that aesthetics, like psychoanalysis, preserves the verifying (...)
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  5. added 2017-10-17
    Kant's Apathology of Compassion.Wolfram Bergande - 2014 - In Louis Schreel (ed.), Schreel, Louis (Ed.): Pathology & Aesthetics. Essays on the Pathological in Kant and Contemporary Aesthetics. Duesseldorf, Germany: Duesseldorf University Press. pp. 11-47.
    In his critical and his later work, Kant recommends apathy to the moral agent faced with pathological phenomena. Notoriously, Kant even rejects compassion (Mitleiden) as pathological. A deconstruction of Kant's 'apathology', i.e. of his systematic treatment of compassion, reveals disgust as quasi-transcendental affect at the roots of the moral agent's apathy.
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  6. added 2014-03-16
    Psychoanalytic Aesthetics: An Introduction to the British School.Nicky Glover - 2009 - Published for the Harris Meltzer Trust by Karnac.
    'This is a book to which the attention of students of art theory and criticism, and all those interested in the important application of psychoanalysis to other ...
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