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61 found
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  1. AI-aesthetics and the artificial author.Emanuele Arielli - forthcoming - Proceedings of the European Society for Aesthetics.
    ABSTRACT. Consider this scenario: you discover that an artwork you greatly admire, or a captivating novel that deeply moved you, is in fact the product of artificial intelligence, not a human’s work. Would your aesthetic judgment shift? Would you perceive the work differently? If so, why? The advent of artificial intelligence (AI) in the realm of art has sparked numerous philosophical questions related to the authorship and artistic intent behind AI-generated works. This paper explores the debate between viewing AI as (...)
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  2. “Even an AI could do that”.Emanuele Arielli - forthcoming - Http://Manovich.Net/Index.Php/Projects/Artificial-Aesthetics.
    Chapter 1 of the ongoing online publication "Artificial Aesthetics: A Critical Guide to AI, Media and Design", Lev Manovich and Emanuele Arielli -/- Book information: Assume you're a designer, an architect, a photographer, a videographer, a curator, an art historian, a musician, a writer, an artist, or any other creative professional or student. Perhaps you're a digital content creator who works across multiple platforms. Alternatively, you could be an art historian, curator, or museum professional. -/- You may be wondering how (...)
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  3. Techno-animism and the Pygmalion effect.Emanuele Arielli & Lev Manovich - forthcoming - Http://Manovich.Net/Index.Php/Projects/Artificial-Aesthetics.
    Chapter 3 of the ongoing publication "Artificial Aesthetics" Book information: Assume you're a designer, an architect, a photographer, a videographer, a curator, an art historian, a musician, a writer, an artist, or any other creative professional or student. Perhaps you're a digital content creator who works across multiple platforms. Alternatively, you could be an art historian, curator, or museum professional. -/- You may be wondering how AI will affect your professional area in general and your work and career. Our book (...)
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  4. Human Perception and The Artificial Gaze.Emanuele Arielli & Lev Manovich - forthcoming - In Emanuele Arielli & Lev Manovich (eds.), Artificial Aesthetics.
  5. Value, Virtue, and Vivienne Westwood: On the Philosophical Importance of Fashion.Colette Olive - 2023 - Open Philosophy 6 (1):481-95.
    The late Vivienne Westwood sketched a role for fashion that elevates it from the prosaic to the status of art, as something important, life-enhancing, and worthy of pursuit. Here, a philosophical treatment of Westwood’s vision of fashion that does justice to the artistic and life-enhancing value that fashion can realise is offered, using an emergent theory in contemporary analytic aesthetics. The virtue theory of art delineates the intrinsic worth of art in terms of the opportunities it provides for us to (...)
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  6. Artists Remake the World: A Contemporary Art Manifesto.Vid Simoniti - 2023 - Yale University Press.
    _An exploration of the relationship between contemporary art, politics, and activism, Artists Remake the World introduces readers to the political ambitions of contemporary art in the early twenty-first century and puts forward a new, wide-ranging account of art’s political potential. Surveying such innovations as evidence-driven art, socially engaged art, and ecological art, the book explores how artists have attempted to offer bold solutions to the world’s problems. Vid Simoniti offers original perspectives on contemporary art and its capacity as a force (...)
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  7. AI-aesthetics and the Anthropocentric Myth of Creativity.Emanuele Arielli & Lev Manovich - 2022 - NODES 1 (19-20).
    Since the beginning of the 21st century, technologies like neural networks, deep learning and “artificial intelligence” (AI) have gradually entered the artistic realm. We witness the development of systems that aim to assess, evaluate and appreciate artifacts according to artistic and aesthetic criteria or by observing people’s preferences. In addition to that, AI is now used to generate new synthetic artifacts. When a machine paints a Rembrandt, composes a Bach sonata, or completes a Beethoven symphony, we say that this is (...)
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  8. Symposium on The Space That Separates: A Realist Theory of Art.Dave Elder-Vass, Andrew Sayer, Tobin Nellhaus, Ian Verstegen, Alan Norrie & Nick Wilson - 2022 - Journal of Critical Realism 22 (1):90-121.
    Editor’s NoteThanks to the initiative of Alan Norrie, we are pleased to present here a symposium on Nick Wilson’s book The Space that Separates: A Realist Theory of Art. Several authors have contri...
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  9. Understanding Aesthetics, Creativity and the Arts.Jay Friedenberg - 2020 - Amazon Direct.
    What is art? What is beauty? Why are we driven to create? People have been struggling with the answers to these questions for millenia. In this book Jay Friedenberg examines age old and contemporary responses to the perceptual and performative side of aesthetics. The work is wide-ranging in scope, addressing all forms of art including painting, photography, writing, film, music, theater, dance, and more. Issues are examined from multiple perspectives with separate chapters on history, philosophy, mathematics, physics, psychology, and neuroscience. (...)
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  10. A Layered, Bounded, Integrated Approach to Research on the Arts Across Disciplines.Dominic McIver Lopes - 2020 - Leonardo 53 (5):537-541.
    Cooperation among arts scholars is thought to be hampered by the division of research on the arts into two cultures, one scientific, one humanistic. This paper proposes an alternative model for research into the arts wherein multiple levels of explanation focussed on well-bounded phenomena integrate research across academic disciplines. Two case studies of research that fits the model are presented.
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  11. Understanding the Role of Thai Aesthetics in Religion, and the Potentiality of a Thai Christian Aesthetic.L. Keith Neigenfind - 2020 - Religion and Social Communication 1 (18):49-66.
    Thailand has a rich history of using aesthetics as a means of communication. This is seen not only in the communication of basic ideas, but aesthetics are also used to communicate the cultural values of the nation. Aesthetical images in Thailand have the tendency to dwell both in the realm of the mundane and the supernatural, in the daily and the esoteric. Historically, many faith traditions have used aesthetics as an effective form of communication, including Buddhism, Brahmanism, as well as (...)
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  12. What Makes a Kind an Art-kind?Michel-Antoine Xhignesse - 2020 - British Journal of Aesthetics 60 (4):471-88.
    The premise that every work belongs to an art-kind has recently inspired a kind-centred approach to theories of art. Kind-centred analyses posit that we should abandon the project of giving a general theory of art and focus instead on giving theories of the arts. The main difficulty, however, is to explain what makes a given kind an art-kind in the first place. Kind-centred theorists have passed this buck on to appreciative practices, but this move proves unsatisfactory. I argue that the (...)
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  13. An Aesthetic Theory in Four Dimensions.Robert Elliott Allinson - 2019 - Dialogue and Universalism 29 (2):53-64.
    The purpose of this article is to synthesize four major elements of aesthetic experience that have previously appeared isolated whenever an attempt at conceptualization is made. These four elements are: Immanuel Kant’s disinterested pleasure, Robin G. Collingwood’s emotional expressionism, the present writer’s redemptive emotional experience, and, lastly, Plato’s concept of Beauty. By taking these four abstracted elements as the bedrock for genuine aesthetic experience, this article aims to clarify the proper role of art as distinct from philosophy and intellectualization. Rather (...)
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  14. Strategies of irreproducibility.Emanuele Arielli - 2019 - Proceedings of the European Society for Aesthetics 11:60-76.
    In this paper I focus on the topic of reproducibility (and irreproducibility) of aesthetic experience and effects, distinguishing it from the traditional subject of artifact reproducibility. The main aim is to outline a typology of the various kind of irreproducibility of aesthetic experience and to draw some implications for the aesthetic discussion concerning contemporary art. Depending on the type of artwork, we can define the difference (or the “ratio”) between aesthetic experience in the presence of the artwork and aesthetic experience (...)
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  15. Beauty.Jennifer A. McMahon - 2019 - Oxford Bibliographies Online: Philosophy.
    This is an 18,500 word bibliography of philosophical scholarship on Beauty which was published online in the Oxford Bibliographies Online. The entry includes an Introduction of 800 words, 21 x 400-word sub-themes and 168 annotated references. INTRODUCTION Philosophical interest in beauty began with the earliest recorded philosophers. Beauty was deemed to be an essential ingredient in a good life and so what it was, where it was to be found and how it was to be included in a life were (...)
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  16. Review of 'The aesthetics and ethics of copying'. Hick, Darren Hudson and Reinhold Schmücker, eds. London: Bloomsbury academic, 2016, XX + 408 pp., 1 b&w illus., £28.99 paper. [REVIEW]Lee Walters - 2019 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 77 (3):345-349.
    A review of 'The aesthetics and ethics of copying'. Hick, Darren Hudson and Reinhold Schmücker, eds.
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  17. Entitled Art: What Makes Titles Names?Michel-Antoine Xhignesse - 2019 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 97 (3):437-450.
    Art historians and philosophers often talk about the interpretive significance of titles, but few have bothered with their historical origins. This omission has led to the assumption that an artwork's title is its proper name, since names and titles share the essential function of facilitating reference to their bearers. But a closer look at the development of our titling practices shows a significant point of divergence from standard analyses of proper names: the semantic content of a title is often crucial (...)
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  18. The Development of the Sense of 'the End of Art’ in Arthur Danto.Raquel Cascales - 2018 - Rivista di Estetica 68 (2):131-148.
    The striking title The End of Art managed to draw attention to the philosophical work of Arthur Danto. However, the lack of a systematic development which could support this thesis made him face harsh criticism. However, strong foundations for his statements can be deduced from his writings. In this paper, I analyse how to understand the thesis of the ‘end of art’. It should be approached not as a monolitical notion but as a complex concept that combines three different senses: (...)
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  19. Littératures et arts du vide, séries of the Colloque de Cerisy, France, Éditions Hermann, 2018.Fan Jiani (ed.) - 2018
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  20. “Le vide dans la poésie du paysage de François Cheng et de Philippe Jaccottet”.Fan Jiani - 2018 - In Littératures et arts du vide, séries of the Colloque de Cerisy, France, Éditions Hermann, 2018. pp. 25-40.
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  21. Aesthetics on the Edge: Where Philosophy Meets the Human Sciences.Dominic Lopes - 2018 - Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.
    This book proposes a new methodology for aesthetics, where problems in philosophy are addressed by examining how aesthetic phenomena are understood in the human sciences. Lopes then puts the methodology to work, illuminating the perceptual and social-pragmatic capacities involved in responding to works of visual art, literature, and music.
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  22. Against Aesthetic/Sensory Dependence.Jiri Benovsky - 2016 - Nordic Journal of Aesthetics 25 (51).
    In his book The Metaphysics of Beauty Nick Zangwill argues for the claim that aesthetic properties metaphysically necessarily depend on sensory properties. This claim plays a role in his argument against physicalist aesthetic realism as well as in the formulation of his own response- dependence view. In this article, I offer reasons to resist the aesthetic/ sensory dependence claim by a discussion of the case of theories, theorems, proofs, and similar theoretical objects, which do possess genuinely aesthetic properties, while these (...)
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  23. What Is an Antique?Benjamin L. Curtis & Darrin Baines - 2016 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 74 (1):75-86.
    Antiques are undoubtedly objects worthy of aesthetic appreciation, but do they have a distinctive aesthetic value in virtue of being antiques? In this article we give an account of what it is to be an antique that gives the thesis that they do have a distinctive aesthetic value a chance of being true and suggests what that distinctive value consists in. After introducing our topic in Section I, in Section II we develop and defend the Adjectival Thesis: the thesis that (...)
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  24. In monstrous shallows: pinpointing where the real art of Jeff Koons lies.Jakob Zaaiman - 2016 - Alldaynight.Info.
    Art is about the exploration of the strange and disturbing; it is not about classical fine crafting. Artists use artworks to exteriorise their inner landscapes, thereby allowing others to experience their take on life, at least vicariously. It is this exteriorisation which is ‘art’, not the aesthetic features of the individual artworks themselves, which is properly the domain of crafting and design. Aesthetics cannot explain the work of many major modern contemporary artists, because it fails to locate the underlying unifying (...)
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  25. Understanding art: a checklist of the three most basic categories of crafted material.Jakob Zaaiman - 2016 - Alldaynight.Info.
    One of the difficulties standing in the way of a straightforward understanding of art is caused by the confusion that arises at a very basic level between the purposes and functions of various types of crafted material. In fact, there are only three major types – covering all eventualities – and being able to differentiate between them very much helps to pinpoint exactly what the special nature of ‘art’ is.
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  26. Uma topografia poética e estética em António Dacosta.Tomás N. Castro - 2015 - Revista de História da Arte 12:266-277.
    This work departs from Beardsley’s critique to the intentional fallacy, in order to introduce the concept of artist’s concerns, extrinsic to works but manifest in them. Then, we will describe António Dacosta’s (1914-1990) unique career, considering topography the main poetical and aesthetic value for some works of the period 1984-1990. And, although they seem to depict islands, we will argue that Dacosta depicted insularity in an unparalleled way. -/- Este trabalho parte da crítica de Beardsley à falácia intencional para propor (...)
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  27. According to the Fiction. A Metaexpressivist Account.Daniel Dohrn - 2015 - Proceedings of the European Society of Aesthetics 7.
    Abstract. I outline the standard picture of fiction. According to this picture, fiction is centred on making believe some truth-apt content. I take a closer look at everyday usage of the expressions ‘according to the fiction’ and ‘in the fiction’ to countervail the streamlining tendencies that come with the standard picture. Having outlined highly variegated use patterns, I argue for a metaexpressivist picture: ‘according to the fiction’ does not primarily report fictional truth but a complex pattern of reactions the fiction (...)
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  28. Nietzsche, Humor and Masochism.Beau Shaw - 2015 - Israeli Journal for Humor Research 4 (2):31-50.
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  29. Resemblance and Representation: An Essay in the Philosophy of Pictures.Ben Blumson - 2014 - Cambridge, UK: Open Book Publishers.
    It’s a platitude – which only a philosopher would dream of denying – that whereas words are connected to what they represent merely by arbitrary conventions, pictures are connected to what they represent by resemblance. The most important difference between my portrait and my name, for example, is that whereas my portrait and I are connected by my portrait’s resemblance to me, my name and I are connected merely by an arbitrary convention. The first aim of this book is to (...)
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  30. Sensuous Presencing and Artistic Creation: The Aesthetic Legacy of Merleau-Ponty’s Thought [on Emmanuel Alloa & Adnen Jdey, Du sensible à l'oeuvre. Esthétiques de Merleau-Ponty, 2012]. [REVIEW]Véronique M. Fóti - 2014 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 6 (2):203-210.
    While the French phenomenologist Maurice Merleau-Ponty remained engaged with artistic creation throughout his entire work, which continues to inspire artists today in manifold ways, no systematic and artistically inclusive study of this dimension of his thought has existed so far. Du sensible à l’œuvre fills this gap by offering not only an in-depth study of Merleau-Ponty’s aesthesiology and aesthetics by international Merleau-Ponty scholars spanning three generations, but also a rich selection of essays by art critics and theorists who assess the (...)
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  31. Sibley on ‘Beautiful’ and ‘Ugly’.Andrea Sauchelli - 2014 - Philosophical Papers 43 (3):377-404.
    Frank Sibley's ideas have been particularly influential among contemporary philosophers interested in aesthetics. Most studies, however, have focused only on his earlier works. In this essay, I explore Sibley's account of the adjectives ‘beautiful’ and ‘ugly’, paying particular attention to three papers that have only recently been published and that have not yet received adequate attention. In particular, I discuss his account of the adjective ‘beautiful’, which relies on the controversial notion of an aesthetic ideal. In addition, I discuss an (...)
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  32. Charis and Radiance: The Ontological Dimensions of Beauty.Lars Spuybroek - 2014 - In S. Van Tuinen (ed.), Giving and Taking: Antidotes to a Culture of Greed. pp. 119–49.
    This essay developed out of the final chapter of The Sympathy of Things where I related beauty to a notion of radical generosity. Tracing generosity back to the ancient Greeks brought me to a whole new world of grace and “charis”, the etymological root of words like charisma and charity. The essay establishes a fundamental connection between grace and beauty, deeply interrelating movement and object. In the second part the argument develops into an ontology based on the concept of radiance, (...)
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  33. Aesthetic Experience, Subjective Historical Experience and the Problem of Constructivism.Jonathan Owen Clark - 2013 - Journal of the Philosophy of History 7 (1):57-81.
    This article takes as its starting point the recent work of Frank Ankersmit on subjective historical experience. Such an experience, which Ankersmit describes as a ‘sudden obliteration of the rift between present and past’ is connected strongly with the Deweyan theory of art as experiential, which contains an account of aesthetic experience as affording a similar breakdown in the polarization of the subject and object of experience. The article shows how other ideas deriving from the phenomenological tradition and the philosophy (...)
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  34. That Obscure Object of Desire: Pleasure in Painful Art.Jonathan Gilmore - 2013 - In Jerrold Levinson (ed.), Suffering Art Gladly: The Paradox of Negative Emotions in Art. Palgrave/Macmillan.
  35. Key Terms in Philosophy of Art.Tiger C. Roholt - 2013 - New York: Bloomsbury Academic.
    Key Terms in Philosophy of Art offers a clear, concise and accessible introduction to a vital sub-field of philosophy. The book offers a comprehensive overview of the key terms, concepts, thinkers and major works in the history of this key area of philosophical thought. Ideal for first-year students coming to the subject for the first time, Key Terms in Philosophy of Art will serve as the ideal companion to the study of this fascinating subject. -/- Tiger C. Roholt provides detailed (...)
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  36. Miscellaneous Texts I: Aesthetics and Theory of Art, and Miscellaneous Texts II: Contemporary Artists (together volume 4 of Jean-Francois Lyotard: Writings on Contemporary Art and Artists).S. Sim - 2013 - British Journal of Aesthetics 53 (1):133-136.
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  37. The Distinct Basic Good of Aesthetic Experience and Its Political Import.Michael R. Spicher - 2013 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 87 (4):711-729.
    To protect art under the First Amendment, John Finnis claims that art is simply the expression of emotion. Later, to protect aesthetic experience from subjectivity, Finnis claims that aesthetic experience is just a form of knowledge. However, neither of these claims adequately accounts for the nature of their objects nor fully protects them. The expression of emotion—intrinsic to art in Finnis’s view—is not always clear or even present, yet people can still appreciate the work. Equally problematic, aesthetic experience is not (...)
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  38. Sensation as participation in visual art.Clive Cazeaux - 2012 - Aesthetic Pathways 2 (2):2-30.
    Can an understanding be formed of how sensory experience might be presented or manipulated in visual art in order to promote a relational concept of the senses, in opposition to the customary, capitalist notion of sensation as a private possession, as a sensory impression that is mine? I ask the question in the light of recent visual art theory and practice which pursue relational, ecological ambitions. As Arnold Berleant, Nicolas Bourriaud, and Grant Kester see it, ecological ambition and artistic form (...)
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  39. The Ages of Beauty: Revisiting Hartshorne's Diagram of Aesthetic Values.Lars Spuybroek - 2012 - In A. Mulder (ed.), Vital Beauty: Reclaiming Aesthetics in the Tangle of Technology and Nature. pp. 32-63.
    This long essay was published in Vital Beauty, a collection including Wendy Steiner and Tim Ingold, which investigates the possibility of new ways toward beauty. This is my first encounter with Hartshorne’s Diagram of Aesthetic Values, a mandala-like structure explaining the relations between aesthetic experiences. The essay looks into the awkward history of the diagram in Hartshorne’s philosophy, its connection to Max Dessoir’s work, to Whitehead’s chapter on beauty in Adventures of Ideas and the notion of creativity in Schelling.
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  40. Hay un arte islámico? Una posible pregunta sobre el estatuto del arte islámico, desde una perspectiva occidental [Is there an islamic art? A possible question about the status of islamic art, from a western perspective].Paulo Vélez León - 2012 - ASRI – Arte y Sociedad. Revista de Investigación 2:1-7.
    The question of the status-onto-epistemological-the art is plausible to apply it to any context and cultural domain? Some authors argue that yes without any remorse, address this position in this note: [1] makes a briefly is a bibliographic description of the debates on this problematic, [2] raises the issue of the status of art, within the framework supported by Belting and Lessing, and [3] in correspondence with the above, indicated summarily the difficulties and considerations to take into account when attempting (...)
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  41. Sam Francis: Lesson of Darkness: “like the paintings of a blind man.” by lyotard, jean‐françois.Mélanie Walton - 2012 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 70 (2):249-251.
    Neither art criticism nor a scholar’s monograph on an artist, Jean-François Lyotard’s Sam Francis: Lesson of Darkness: ‘like the paintings of a blind man’ is a reflection that engages both the painter and 43 of his works into a conversation alternating painting and aphoristic writing. Their order follows neither the chronology of the works nor a linear argument in the prose. And yet, the work generates the strongest feeling of there being a continuity in this peculiar dialogue of pictures and (...)
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  42. The Sympathy of Things: Ruskin and the Ecology of Design.Lars Spuybroek - 2011/2016 - V2_NAI Publishers/Bloomsbury.
    The revised and expanded edition of The Sympathy of Things with Bloomsbury Academic, which appeared in 2016. The pdf sample contains the new preface to the second edition and the foreword by Brian Massumi.
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  43. The Unexamined Cup is not Worth Drinking.Kristopher G. Phillips - 2011-03-04 - In Fritz Allhoff, Scott F. Parker & Michael W. Austin (eds.), Coffee. Wiley‐Blackwell. pp. 34–45.
    This chapter contains sections titled: What Is It Like to Be a Philosopher of Coffee? What Is It Like to Drink Coffee? Why Is the Unexamined Cup Not Worth Drinking?
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  44. Minimal authorship (of sorts).Christy Mag Uidhir - 2011 - Philosophical Studies 154 (3):373 - 387.
    I propose a minimal account of authorship that specifies the fundamental nature of the author-relation and its minimal domain composition in terms of a three-place causal-intentional relation holding between agents and sort-relative works. I contrast my account with the minimal account tacitly held by most authorship theories, which is a two-place relation holding between agents and works simpliciter. I claim that only my view can ground productive and informative principled distincitons between collective production and collective authorship.
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  45. “Jackie O; or how I learned to stop worrying and love my Chanel”.Ellen Fridland & Andrew Porter - 2010 - In Brian Seitz And Ron Scapp (ed.), Fashion Statements: On Style, Appearance, and Reality. Palgrave-Macmillan.
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  46. Fashion Statements: On Style, Appearance, and Reality.Brian Seitz And Ron Scapp (ed.) - 2010 - Palgrave-Macmillan.
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  47. Art For Art’s Sake In The Old Stone Age.Gregory Currie - 2009 - Postgraduate Journal of Aesthetics 6 (1):1-23.
    Is there a sensible version of the slogan “Art for art’s sake”? If there is, does it apply to anything? I believe that the answers to these questions are Yes and Yes. A positive answer to the first question alone would not be of interest; an intelligible claim without application does not do us much good. It’s the positive answer to the second question which is, I think, more important and perhaps surprising, since I claim to find art for art’s (...)
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  48. Colour Spectral Counterpoints. Case Study on Aestetic Judgement in the Experimental Sciences.Olaf L. Müller - 2009 - In Ingo Nussbaumer & Galerie Hubert Winter (eds.), Restraint versus Intervention: Painting as Alignment. Verlag für moderne Kunst.
    When it became uncool to speak of beauty with respect to pieces of art, physicists started claiming that their results are beautiful. They say, for example, that a theory's beauty speaks in favour of its truth, and that they strive to perform beautiful experiments. What does that mean? The notion cannot be defined. (It cannot be defined in the arts either). Therefore, I elucidate it with examples of optical experimentation. Desaguliers' white synthesis, for example, is more beautiful than Newton's, and (...)
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  49. How Can There Be Works Of Art?Michael Morris - 2008 - Postgraduate Journal of Aesthetics 5 (3):1-18.
    Interested in art, we tend to be interested in works of art. We seem to encounter works of art all the time, and—setting aside certain relatively abstruse problems in ontology—we seem to have little difficulty in recognizing them for what they are. That there are works of art seems obvious and unproblematic. Quite so, I think. But reflection on what has to be the case if there are to be works of art shows that some quite demanding conditions have to (...)
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  50. Matthias Grünewald e l’Altare di Isenheim, tra “Ars Pictorica” e Teologia.Gaetano Iaia - 2007 - Proculus 81 (3/4):289-297.
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