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  1. Dionysian Poiesis and Demonic Grounds; Or, Creative Rebelliousness and Method-Making.Lee A. Mcbride Iii - manuscript
    Metaphors and allegories, storytelling and poetic language can serve a noble purpose in philosophy. In this vein, I focus on the role of rebellious poiesis (making), creative/imaginative works, and tactful praxis (doing) in helping the oppressed and immiserated escape from the intervening background assumptions (the episteme), the system that tacitly sets the boundaries and limitations of rational discourse in our present epoch. The claim is that we, in the West, dwell within socio-political geographies ordered by colonial and capitalist projects designed (...)
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  2. Afro-Latinx, Hispanic and Latinx Identity: Understanding the Americas.Eric Bayruns Garcia - forthcoming - Critical Philosophy of Race.
    I present a novel position vis-à-vis the views in the Latin American philosophy literature regarding whether subjects more aptly use "Hispanic" or "Latinx" to refer to Hispanic- or-Latinx people. To this end, I will argue (C) the term "Afro-Latinx" is more apt than "Hispanic" or "Latinx" in a significant number of cases. This conclusion is based on three premises. The first premise (P1) is that use of "Afro-Latinx" provides subjects with understanding of how certain events depend on anti-Black racism, US (...)
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  3. Phenomenology of Flesh: Fanon’s Critique of Hegelian Recognition and Buck-Morss’ Haiti Thesis.Grant Brown - forthcoming - Rhizomes: Cultural Studies in Emerging Knowledge.
    This philosophical investigation interrogates the relationship between G.W.F. Hegel’s concept of the master-slave dialectic in The Phenomenology of Spirit and the critique and reformulation of it by Frantz Fanon in Black Skin, White Masks. As a means of contextualization and expansion of Hegel’s original textual account, I consider Susan Buck-Morss’ seminal defense through grounding the dialectic in Hegel’s possible historical knowledge of the Haitian Revolution. I maintain that despite a compelling picture, Buck-Morss’ insights are unable to fully vindicate Hegel from (...)
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  4. Tornadic Black Angels: Vodou, Dance, Revolution.Joshua M. Hall - forthcoming - Journal of Black Studies.
    This article explores the history of Vodou from outlawed African dance to revolutionary magic to depoliticized national Haitian religion and popular dance, its present reduction to Diaspora interpersonal healing, and a possible future. My first section, on Kate Ramsey’s The Spirits and the Law: Vodou and Power in Haiti, reveals Vodou as a sociopolitical construction of racist legal oppression of Africana dances rituals, and artistic-political resistance thereto. My second section, on Karen McCarthy Brown’s Mama Lola: A Vodou Priestess in Brooklyn, (...)
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  5. Elizabeth Pérez, The Gut: A Black Atlantic Alimentary Tract (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2022). Pp. 84. £17.00 (Pbk). ISBN 9781009031530. [REVIEW]José Eduardo Porcher - forthcoming - Religious Studies:1-2.
    In The Gut, published in the series Cambridge Elements in Magic, Elizabeth Pérez offers an in-depth exploration of the belly's significance in Afro-Diasporic religions, particularly Cuban Lucumí, Brazilian Candomblé, and Haitian Vodou. The book delves into the cognitive role of the gut in recognizing Black Atlantic knowledge and is organized into eight sections, covering gut feelings, beings within the belly, African precedents, and the offering of guts to deities. Through participant observation and archival research, Pérez connects literal gutting in kitchen (...)
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  6. Christian Moral Freedom and the Transgender Person in advance.Elizabeth Sweeny Block - forthcoming - CLR James Journal.
  7. The Promise of Manumission: Appropriations and Responses to the Notion of Emancipation in the Caribbean and South America in the First Half of the Nineteenth Century.Miguel Gualdrón Ramírez - 2024 - In Kris F. Sealey & Benjamin P. Davis (eds.), Creolizing Critical Theory: New Voices in Caribbean Philosophy. Lanham: Rowman & Littlefield. pp. 61-81.
    In this text, I consider two examples in the history of emancipation and manumission of enslaved, Black populations in the Caribbean and South America in order to theorize a colonial mode of conceiving of freedom at play in the first half of the nineteenth century. This mode is marked by the figure of the promise, enacting a notion of freedom as a constantly deferred, external compensation. Indeed, instead of an immediate decision deeming the practice of enslavement and trade of human (...)
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  8. 2 Bringing Africa to the Americas: The Creolizing of Afro-Caribbean Philosophy.Chike Jeffers - 2024 - In Jacoby Adeshei Carter & Hernando Arturo Estévez (eds.), Philosophizing the Americas. Fordham University Press. pp. 28-46.
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  9. The Sociology of Development and the Underdevelopment of Sociology.Anton L. Allahar - 2023 - CLR James Journal 29 (1):61-83.
    In the present essay my aim is first to review and extend Frank’s thinking on ‘the sociology of development,’ and second, I will attempt to apply his insights to some of the new or present-day directions in sociological theory and research with a view to showing how they might be seen as contributing to ‘the underdevelopment of sociology.’ Beginning with the vision of the founding fathers of sociology broadly understood, I will argue that that vision and the promise of sociology (...)
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  10. Caribbean Development from Colonialism to Post-neoliberal Multipolarity.Dennis C. Canterbury - 2023 - CLR James Journal 29 (1):91-116.
    Arguably, Caribbean development has evolved through three distinct historical periods in international political economy and currently must find its way in a fourth—the new multipolar world order. The hitherto three periods were characterized by a system of multipolar colonial imperial empires, bipolar cold war with neocolonialism, and unipolar neoliberalism. The purpose here is to unlock the door to critical thinking on Caribbean social, political, and economic policies for the new multipolarity. The region must dial back its blind pursuit of self-regulating (...)
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  11. Criminalizing Black Reason.Derefe Kimarley Chevannes - 2023 - CLR James Journal 29 (1):195-220.
    This paper critically examines the nexus between the scientific method and the study of race in the contemporary world. It begins by historicizing the emergence of the scientific method as indispensable to the advent of European modernity. The development of modernity collapsed into the racialization of black subjects as subhuman and criminal. This criminalization of blackness occurs at two critical junctures: the arrest of blacks via plantation enslavement and the concomitant imprisoning of black bodies of thought. The consequence of modernity’s (...)
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  12. A Sociology of Possibilities.George K. Danns - 2023 - CLR James Journal 29 (1):85-90.
    Caribbean sociology accords with the Du Boisan paradigm of sociology as a science. Caribbean sociology originated as an undifferentiated discipline. It is a panoply of social thought integrated with history, political science, anthropology, psychology, and philosophy. Sociology has never been a discipline sufficient unto itself. To speak of Caribbean sociology is to introduce space and place, territory, and identity as parameters of a social scientific discipline that is yet to adhere to its own boundaries or adequately define itself. Caribbean countries (...)
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  13. A New Skin for the Wounds of History: Fanon’s Affective Sociogeny and Ricœur’s Carnal Hermeneutics.J. Reese Faust - 2023 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 49 (9):1128-1154.
    This article argues that, despite their distance across the colonial divide, a creolizing reading of Frantz Fanon and Paul Ricœur can yield valuable insights into decoloniality. Tracing their shared philosophical concerns with embodied phenomenology, social ontology and recognition, I argue that their respective accounts of sociogeny and hermeneutics can be productively read together as describing a shared end of mutual recognition untainted by racism or coloniality – a ‘new skin’ for humanity, as Fanon describes it. More specifically, Fanon contributes to (...)
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  14. Blurring the Lines of Demarcation.Stephanie Fullerton-Cooper - 2023 - CLR James Journal 29 (1):117-135.
    This paper seeks to challenge the “fixed line” between disciplines by exploring the interconnections of Sociology and Caribbean Literature. It highlights the Caribbean author as a social activist and policymaker whose aim is to agitate for improvement in various social conditions. The writings of three Caribbean authors—Erna Brodber of Jamaica, as well Frank McField and Roy Bodden of the Cayman Islands—are examined. Through their published and unpublished works, through their fiction and non-fiction, the interconnection between Sociology and Caribbean Literature is (...)
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  15. Poetic Traditions of Revolt in the Caribbean.Oscar Guardiola-Rivera & Juan Felipe García - 2023 - CLR James Journal 29 (1):13-60.
    How to reciprocate a precious gift? In this case the gift was given to us twice. First, in the shape of Paget Henry’s pioneering reinvention of René Ménil’s “Aesthetic Marxism.” Through it, second, we’re led to rediscover the fantastic world of Ménil’s hitherto ignored but crucial contribution to contemporary philosophy: his systematization of the poetics of revolt. Our debt with Ménil and Henry is unpayable. Our humble response in this essay is to offer readers a map to the treasure that (...)
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  16. Editor’s Note.Paget Henry - 2023 - CLR James Journal 29 (1):1-3.
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  17. Between Poetry and Politics.Paget Henry - 2023 - CLR James Journal 29 (1):299-306.
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  18. The Crisis of Caribbean Sociology and a Sociology of Crisis.Paget Henry - 2023 - CLR James Journal 29 (1):137-163.
    In this paper, I argue that macro-theorizing in the field of Caribbean sociology is going through a crisis of transition from the third to the fourth major period in its 100-year-old process of historical development. It is a transition from a period in which the houses of earlier Caribbean macro-theorizing in the social sciences, such as creole theory, cultural pluralism and dependency theory, were blown from the center and displaced by the simultaneous arrival of two re-colonizing intellectual hurricanes from the (...)
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  19. Gordon Rohlehr: Celebrating the Life of a Bookman.Leslie R. James - 2023 - CLR James Journal 29 (1):5-11.
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  20. Of Wandering, Theory, and Transcendence: A Review of Ashmita Khasnabish’s Virtual Diaspora, Postcolonial Literature and Feminism. [REVIEW]Thomas Jay Lynn - 2023 - CLR James Journal 29 (1):289-293.
  21. Food, Focal Practices, and Decolonial Agrarianism.Lee A. McBride - 2023 - In Samantha Noll & Zachary Piso (eds.), Paul B. Thompson's Philosophy of Agriculture: Fields, Farmers, Forks, and Food. Springer Verlag. pp. 131-143.
    Agrarianism, according to Paul B. Thompson, is an environmental philosophy focused on agriculture and the nurturing of food, fuel, and fiber. Agrarianism hopes to re-establish our fundamental connection to the land, helping us approach a tenable understanding of sustainability. Thompson enlists Albert Borgmann’s notion of “focal practices” to discuss farming and the culture of the table. With this comes a critique of “the device paradigm,” the modern technological way of life that alienates us from quotidian beauty, lifecycles and seasonality, and (...)
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  22. Practicing Out of Tune.Rachel McNealis - 2023 - CLR James Journal 29 (1):295-298.
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  23. Creolized Reflection.Thomas Meagher - 2023 - In Kris Sealey & Storm Heter (eds.), Creolizing Sartre. Rowman & Littlefield. pp. 135–147.
    This paper discusses Jean-Paul Sartre's conceptions of pure reflection and impure reflection, affirming the distinction but arguing for an intermediate mode of reflection: creolized reflection. Creolized reflection is not impure as it does not regard consciousness as being-in-itself, but it transcends pure reflection in concretely negating the relationship between consciousness and imposed conceptions of being-in-itself. I argue that this mode of reflection is at play in much Africana phenomenology and conceptions of potentiated double consciousness.
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  24. Jorge Zúñiga M. Enrique Dussel. Retratos de una filosofía de la liberación.Frederick Mills - 2023 - CLR James Journal 29 (1):253-261.
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  25. Affectivity and Marxism after Luxemburg.Marilyn Nissim-Sabat - 2023 - CLR James Journal 29 (1):263-271.
  26. A Forgotten Revolutionary Solidarity.Yue Qiu - 2023 - CLR James Journal 29 (1):165-194.
    Though a few scholars have discussed the transnational engagement of Caribbean thinkers with China, hitherto unknown is the imaginative alliance Left-wing Chinese writers crafted with the Caribbean via their works on the Haitian Revolution. This paper explores writings by four Chinese Marxists—Li Chunhui, Wang Chunliang, Lu Guojun, and Mao Xianglin—who engaged with Caribbean intellectuals, like Eric Williams, and used the history of the first anti-colonial revolution to rethink China’s own decolonial experiment. During the Maoist era, these thinkers argued for the (...)
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  27. Fanon and Soap Advertising.Annalee Ring - 2023 - CLR James Journal 29 (1):221-251.
    This paper critically examines the pervasive colonial myth that associates whiteness with cleanliness and blackness with dirtiness, a myth often perpetuated through media, especially soap advertisements. Through an analysis of Frantz Fanon’s contributions to psychoanalysis and phenomenology, the paper elucidates how racial constructs are sociogenically constructed and internalized, shaping the collective unconscious. Focusing on Fanon’s phenomenological exploration of the white gaze, the paper highlights its role in overdetermining the black man, reducing them to an object embodying racial myths. The paper (...)
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  28. Disaggregating the State from the Euromodern State.August Shipman - 2023 - CLR James Journal 29 (1):273-280.
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  29. A Review of Miraj U. Desai, Derek Hook, and Leswin Laubscher (eds.) Fanon, Phenomenology, and Psychology. [REVIEW]Justin Wooley - 2023 - CLR James Journal 29 (1):281-287.
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  30. Habermas’ Colonization Thesis in the Digital Network: Pandemic Resistance in Advanced Capitalism.Alexander Avila - 2022 - CLR James Journal 28 (1):181-201.
    As scholars anticipate the structural reconfigurations arising from the COVID-19 pandemic, resistance to pandemic measures remains a site of rich discussion. While previous researchers have studied anti-mask, anti-vaccine, and anti-lockdown action, here called anti-restriction movements, as a series of actions informed by individual characteristics like psychological profiles, political leanings, or gender, this paper emphasizes how anti-restriction actions evolved into social movements articulating the antagonisms between state and subject. This paper applies Jürgen Habermas’s theory of New Social Movements (NSMs) to theorize (...)
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  31. Neoliberal Capitalism, Older Adult Care and Feminist Theory.Samantha Brady - 2022 - CLR James Journal 28 (1):85-108.
    Classic feminist social theory highlights the exploitation of women’s labor in capitalist societies traditionally through an examination of how housework and childcare is perceived and organized, excluding an explicit analysis of older adult care work. In light of the surge in the demand for older adult caregiving over the last several decades, this paper uses older adult care work as a new lens to understand how gender, and its intersections with other critical identities such as race, ethnicity, and nativity, are (...)
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  32. The Black Cogito and the History of Unreason.Brendan John Brown - 2022 - CLR James Journal 28 (1):33-60.
    This essay seeks to unsettle the overrepresented, Eurocentric grounds of a pivotal debate in the history of Western philosophy. The debate between Michel Foucault and Jacques Derrida on the topic of madness has had central significance for twentieth-century continental thought due to its lasting impact on the development, reception, and stakes of the respective thinker’s methodologies. While heavily written on and analyzed from the perspective of Western academic philosophy, little attention has been paid to the racialized, ‘Third World’ origins and (...)
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  33. Justice as a Labor of Care: Self-Care, Collective Entanglement, and Feminist Activism in Caribbean Spaces.Honor Ford-Smith & Beverley Hanson - 2022 - Palimpsest 11 (1):42-65.
  34. Protestando contra todo lo que la belleza no es. O ¿por qué es tan bello el mundo?Miguel Gualdron Ramirez - 2022 - Ideas Y Valores 71 (9).
    En este texto reconstruyo una concepción decolonial de la belleza, a partir del pensamiento de Robin Wall Kimmerer y Édouard Glissant, de acuerdo con la cual la belleza constituye una condición del mundo que, no obstante, debemos cuidar. En estos dos pensamientos, provenientes de tradiciones diferentes, la belleza es tanto lo que se ve amenazado por el proyecto colonial occidental, como lo que permite su resistencia decolonial. Reconstruir la belleza del mundo es necesario y, sin embargo, imposible: su búsqueda implica (...)
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  35. Caliban and Caribbean Philosophy: Remembering George Lamming.Paget Henry - 2022 - CLR James Journal 28 (1):11-19.
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  36. Editor’s Note.Paget Henry - 2022 - CLR James Journal 28 (1):1-2.
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  37. Can White Americans Include Colors in Their Canon? Searching a Post-National History of American Philosophy.Ferry Hidayat - 2022 - Rubikon 9:119-133.
    Racism in the USA not only takes place in law, economics, politics, mass media and new media, education, literature, and popular culture but also occurs in philosophy. An abundance of Latino philosophers, African-American philosophers, and Native American philosophers are excluded from the American philosophy canon. To discover whether racism happens in the field of American philosophy, the writer surveys 15 American philosophy books written between the 1940s and the 2020s by various American writers, the whites and the non-whites. The writer (...)
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  38. C.L.R. James’s Socialist Polis.Talia Isaacson - 2022 - CLR James Journal 28 (1):129-158.
    This paper examines C.L.R James’s interpretation of Athenian democracy in “Every Cook Can Govern” (1956). It seeks to explain why Athenian democracy remained indispensable to James’s political thought. I argue that James reinterprets Athens as a proto-workers’ state, and explore the resulting contradictions and complexities. Within “Every Cook Can Govern” James presents a radical interpretation of Athenian Democracy at three points: (1) James claims that slavery in Athens was humane and economically insignificant, (2) he supports the theory of the “Athenian (...)
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  39. Bernadine Evaristo’s Manifesto On Never Giving Up.Anique John - 2022 - CLR James Journal 28 (1):235-246.
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  40. The Case of Djamila Boupacha and an Ethics of Ambiguity: Opacity, Marronage, and the Veil.Ruthanne Crapo Kim - 2022 - CLR James Journal 28 (1):159-179.
    In this article, I briefly sketch the “right to opacity” that Édouard Glissant details in Poetics of Relation and situate it as an ethical imperative with Simone de Beauvoir’s Ethics of Ambiguity, contrasting the distinctive contributions of opacity and ambiguity toward ethical-political living. I apply the principles of opacity and ambiguity toward one of Beauvoir’s most political and only co-written works, Pour Djamila Boupacha. I argue that the polyvalent use of the Islamic veil during the Algerian War for Independence reveals (...)
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  41. Encounters with the Barbadian Bard.Linden F. Lewis - 2022 - CLR James Journal 28 (1):3-9.
    In this short tribute, the author outlines his personal and intellectual relationship with the writer George Lamming, which spans over three decades. He provides an account of the bricolage of Lamming’s mentorship and friendship, and its impact on his intellectual development. This panegyric essay focuses on the conceptual and narrative world which George Lamming occupied. It also provides insights into the bond he forged with other Caribbean writers, as well as the relationships he established with the region’s best-known politicians, academics (...)
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  42. Walter Rodney and Samir Amin: From Relations of Underdevelopment to Global Decolonization.Thomas Meagher - 2022 - In Globalizing Political Theory. New York, NY, USA: pp. 99-108.
    A discussion of the political theory of Walter Rodney and Samir Amin, focusing on Rodney's How Europe Underdeveloped Africa and Amin's Eurocentrism.
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  43. Ceremonies of Liberation: On Wynter and Solidarity.Elisabeth Paquette - 2022 - CLR James Journal 28 (1):61-83.
    The focus of this essay is Sylvia Wynter’s conception of ceremony. I argue that ceremonies provide the conditions for a new conception of what it means to be human, that is no longer hierarchical. As such, both ceremonies and this new human are necessary for processes of liberation. In order to be liberatory, however, ceremonies must be place-based and yet fluid and mobile, are steeped in history and are thrust into the future, depend upon community, and impact daily experiences. I (...)
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  44. Diagne and Amselle’s In Search of Africa(s).Elisabeth Paquette - 2022 - CLR James Journal 28 (1):229-234.
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  45. #ProtectBlackWomen and Other Hashtags: Using Amílcar Cabral’s Resistance and Decolonization Framework as an Ethic for Obligations Between Black Agents.Corey Reed - 2022 - CLR James Journal 28 (1):203-225.
    For those who subscribe to a pro-Black political ideology, like that of Pan-Africanism or Black Nationalism, is there a specific moral obligation between Black agents to protect one another against intersectional/multidimensional oppressions? Africana people are often subjugated to other forms of domination outside of anti-Black racism exclusively. When examining offenses against Black women, queer Black people, poor Black people, etc., both Black Nationalist and Pan-Africanist ethics suggest a moral obligation of protection to all Africana people, but there are varying ways (...)
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  46. Charles Mills, Too Early.Teófilo Reis - 2022 - CLR James Journal 28 (1):31-32.
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  47. Time’s entanglements: Beauvoir and Fanon on reductive temporalities.Marilyn Stendera - 2022 - Continental Philosophy Review 56 (1):1-20.
    Simone de Beauvoir and Frantz Fanon both argue that oppression fundamentally constrains the subject’s relationship to and embodied experience of time, yet their accounts of temporality are rarely brought together. This paper will explore what we might learn about the operation of different types of reductive temporality if we read Beauvoir and Fanon alongside each other, focusing primarily on the early works that arguably lay out the central concerns of their respective temporal frameworks. At first glance, it seems that these (...)
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  48. The Patriarchal Subject, Paradigm of Family and Woman Trafficking in China.Xiangning Xu - 2022 - CLR James Journal 28 (1):109-127.
    Instigated by the incident of the chained woman in Feng County, Jiang Su Province, this paper offers a phenomenological argument on the workhorses legitimizing and sustaining women trafficking in China. Specifically, I leverage the Imperial Man and the Paradigm of War by Nelson Maldonado-Torres and construct a pair of paralleled concepts: the Patriarchal Man and the Paradigm of Family. In analyzing the social media coverage of the chained woman and government responses, I argue that the Patriarchal Man and the Paradigm (...)
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  49. Charles Mills: On Seeing and Naming the Whiteness of Philosophy.George Yancy - 2022 - CLR James Journal 28 (1):21-30.
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  50. Too Late: Fanon, the dismembered past, and a phenomenology of racialized time.Alia Al-Saji - 2021 - In Leswin Laubscher, Derek Hook & Miraj Desai (eds.), Fanon, Phenomenology and Psychology. New York: Routledge. pp. 177–193.
    This essay asks after the lateness that affectively structures Fanon's phenomenology of racialized temporality in Black Skin,White Masks. I broach this through the concepts of possibility, “affective ankylosis”, and by taking seriously the dismembered past that haunts Fanon's text. The colonization of the past involves a bifurcation of time and of memory. To the “burning past,” wherein colonized experience is stuck and to which we remain sensitive, is contrasted the colonial construction of white, western time as progressive and futural—a construction (...)
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