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  1. Language and Being(S): Édouard Glissant and Martin Heidegger.Isabel Astrachan - forthcoming - Clr James Journal.
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  2. “Double Consciousness,” Cultural Identity and Literary Style in the Work of René Ménil in Advance.Celia Britton - forthcoming - Clr James Journal.
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  3. Reinventing Humor Politics and Poetics of Laughter in René Ménil’s ‘Humour: Introduction À 1945’.Corine Labridy-Stofle - forthcoming - Clr James Journal.
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  4. Centralism is a Dangerous Tool Leadership in C.L.R. James’s History of Principles.William Clare Roberts - forthcoming - Clr James Journal.
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  5. Language and Being.Isabel Astrachan - 2020 - Clr James Journal 26 (1):163-176.
    In the mid-twentieth century, many philosophers took up as their aim the destruction of Western metaphysics. Martinican philosopher, novelist, poet, and playwright Édouard Glissant and German philosopher Martin Heidegger were two such authors. Driven by a profound dissatisfaction with the logocentrism of Western metaphysics and concerns over what the tradition excluded—for Glissant, the experience of the creolized and post-colonial subject, and for Heidegger, the “Question of Being”—both advocated for more creative engagement with language and advanced particular views about the link (...)
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  6. “Double Consciousness,” Cultural Identity and Literary Style in the Work of René Ménil.Celia Britton - 2020 - Clr James Journal 26 (1):119-132.
    The notion of double consciousness, as a characterization of black subjectivity, is basic to Ménil’s critique of the alienated “mythologies” of Antillean life and its self-exoticizing literature. Double consciousness renders cultural identity deeply problematic. But it has other, more positive, manifestations, closer to a Bakhtinian idea of dialogism. Thus he praises Césaire’s use of irony as a dual voice. Ménil’s valorization of complexity and ambiguity in literature, against the simple naturalism favoured by the Communist Party but which he insists is (...)
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  7. Uneasy Landscapes.Suzy Cater - 2020 - Clr James Journal 26 (1):51-66.
    This article offers an unprecedented close reading of the poetic texts created by the Martinican author René Ménil, whose poetry has been almost entirely neglected by scholars to date and who is better known for his philosophical and political writings than for his verse. I pay particular attention to Ménil’s treatment of geographical and cultural spaces in his published poetry from 1932 to 1950, and place that verse in dialogue with a text by another Martinican author at work around this (...)
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  8. What Could Human Rights Do? A Decolonial Inquiry.Benjamin Davis - 2020 - Transmodernity 5 (9):1-22.
    It is one thing to consider what human rights have been and another to inquire into what they could be. In this essay, I present a history of human rights vis-à-vis decolonization. I follow the scholarship of Samuel Moyn to suggest that human rights presented a “moral alternative” to political utopias. The question remains how to politicize the moral energy around human rights today. I argue that defending what Édouard Glissant calls a “right to opacity” could politicize the ethical energy (...)
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  9. The Tracées of René Ménil.Anjuli I. Gunaratne - 2020 - Clr James Journal 26 (1):87-118.
    The figure of the tracée is significant for Ménil’s understanding of spatio-temporality, an understanding upon which rest, so this essay argues, his concepts of critique, poetic knowledge, and literary form. The argument takes as its starting point the work Ménil did to conceptualize history as the poesis of recuperation. In doing so, the essay argues for a renewed understanding of Ménil’s contribution to Caribbean philosophy as a whole. One of the most important components of this contribution, the essay claims, is (...)
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  10. A Review of Teodros Kiros’s Self Definition: A Philosophical Inquiry From the Global South and Global North. [REVIEW]D. J. Hatfield - 2020 - Clr James Journal 26 (1):295-298.
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  11. Editor’s Note.Paget Henry - 2020 - Clr James Journal 26 (1):1-3.
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  12. Self, Language and Metaphysics: A Review of Teodros Kiros’s Self-Definition: A Philosophical Inquiry From the Global South and Global North. [REVIEW]Paget Henry - 2020 - Clr James Journal 26 (1):299-306.
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  13. Ban Ban Caliban: A Tribute to Kamau Brathwaite.Paget Henry - 2020 - Clr James Journal 26 (1):7-10.
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  14. W.E.B. DuBois, Racial Capitalism and Black Economic Development in the United States.Paget Henry & George Danns - 2020 - Clr James Journal 26 (1):267-291.
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  15. The Red and the Black.Christian Høgsbjerg - 2020 - Clr James Journal 26 (1):179-198.
    This paper seeks to situate the idea and intellectual narrative of “world revolution” in its modern historical context, tracing it back to the age of democratic revolution in the late eighteenth century, and then developed by great revolutionary thinkers like Marx and Engels. It examines the possible limitations of Marx and Engels’s vision of world revolution with respect to the Third World as a result of their European intellectual formation in the tradition of the Enlightenment, and examines the charge of (...)
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  16. René Ménil: Philosophy, Aesthetics, and the Antillean Subject.Justin Izzo & H. Adlai Murdoch - 2020 - Clr James Journal 26 (1):17-32.
    René Ménil was a renowned Martinican essayist, critic, and philosopher who, along with Aimé Césaire, Frantz Fanon, and Edouard Glissant, left an indelible mark on the Franco-Caribbean world of letters and intellectual thought. Ménil saw in surrealism a critical framework, a means to the specific end of exploring and expressing the specificities of the Martinican condition. Ménil assessed Martinique’s pre-war psychological condition through the telling metaphor of relative exoticism, pointing clearly to the typically unacknowledged fact that the exotic is a (...)
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  17. Annie John: Analysis of Becoming a Woman and The Caribbean Mother-Daughter Relationship.Anique John - 2020 - Clr James Journal 26 (1):243-266.
    The dynamic mother-daughter relationship can be loving and supportive at best as well as contentious and tragic. It is a relationship predicated on maternal instinct which can provide direction and support for deep insight into notions of womanhood, personal and political philosophies. However, in providing this guidance, ironically this same maternal guidance can act to stifle the growth of an adolescent daughter as she transitions into womanhood. Jamaica Kincaid’s ‘Annie John’ can be seen as an exemplar of this transition. Annie (...)
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  18. René Ménil’s Myths of Origin and Labor Activism in the French Antilles.Annette Joseph-Gabriel - 2020 - Clr James Journal 26 (1):133-152.
    Between January and February 2009, the longest general strike in French history took place in Guadeloupe and Martinique. The labor movement had far reaching implications for the relationship between France and its overseas departments. In particular, they brought to the fore France’s colonial history in the Antilles, with attendant questions of race, citizenship and sovereignty that highlighted once again the cracks in the image of Antilleans as full French citizens. René Ménil’s essays provide a unique lens through which to read (...)
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  19. Reinventing Humor.Corine Labridy-Stofle - 2020 - Clr James Journal 26 (1):67-85.
    On the eve of 1945, after the retreat of Admiral Robert but before the end of the war, René Ménil wrote an essay extolling humor as a quintessential literary mode of resistance and predicting that colonial authors would go on to contribute significantly to a literature of humor. This article seeks to clarify what humor means to Ménil by illuminating his engagement with Dada, the surrealist movement, Freud, and the concept of irony. In contemplating both the essay’s poetics and politics, (...)
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  20. A Poetics of Reimagining: The Radical Epistemologies of Wynter and Glissant.Miranda Luiz - 2020 - Clr James Journal 26 (1):155-161.
    Sylvia Wynter and Édouard Glissant are twentieth-century cultural theorists from Jamaica and Martinique, respectively. Their literary work critiques western knowledge production and the ways in which colonial modes of thinking have negatively impacted Caribbean subjectivity. This essay explores the counter-hegemonic poetics of Wynter’s essay “The Ceremony Must Be Found: After Humanism” and Glissant’s book “Poetics of Relation,” comparing their epistemologies and methods of literary production. To understand the philosophical resonances of these texts, they are situated in a framework of western (...)
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  21. The Last Insurrection.René Ménil & Corine Labridy-Stofle - 2020 - Clr James Journal 26 (1):33-38.
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  22. Dialogue with René Ménil.René Ménil, Daniel Maximin, Rebecca Krasner & Christiane Goldman - 2020 - Clr James Journal 26 (1):39-50.
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  23. Postcoloniality in the Age of Pandemic: A Review of Ashmita Khasnabish (Ed.) Postcoloniality, Globalization, and Diaspora: What’s Next? [REVIEW]Tracey Nicholls - 2020 - Clr James Journal 26 (1):307-311.
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  24. Centralism is a Dangerous Tool.William Clare Roberts - 2020 - Clr James Journal 26 (1):219-240.
    This essay seeks to bring into focus the latent political theory of CLR James’s World Revolution, 1917-1936, and to show, on this basis, how World Revolution explains certain difficult aspects of The Black Jacobins. The core of James’s theory is the thesis that social classes are organically and internally identified, and that each has a preformed and unitary interest, which can be articulated as a set of political principles. A class is called to act by the voice that expresses the (...)
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  25. Peril and Possibility.Candace Sobers - 2020 - Clr James Journal 26 (1):199-218.
    In a 2012 review article, Anthony P. Maingot made a case for each generation rewriting history according to its own needs and preoccupations. Everyone, he suggested, has their own C.L.R. James. Everyone, perhaps, except students of international relations and international history, where references to James’s copious and critical body of work are less common. In the spirit of finding one’s own James, this article employs The Black Jacobins and James’s other magnum opus, World Revolution,1917–1936: The Rise and Fall of the (...)
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  26. The Afrocentric ‘Copernican Revolution’.Bettina Bergo - 2019 - Clr James Journal 25 (1):39-58.
    This article summarizes the Afro-centric ‘Copernican Revolution’ of Cheikh Anta Diop between 1960 and 1974, the dates on which he defended his thesis on the African identity of Egypt and argued his thesis, with Théophile Obenga, before the UNESCO Cairo Conference on the “General History of Africa.” I discuss both the unhappy reception, by European Egyptologists and others, of Diop’s ground-breaking, multidisciplinary research, as well as its gradual spread, among others, to Diasporic thinkers. One such thinker, Marimba Ani took a (...)
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  27. The Grace of James Hal Cone.M. Shawn Copeland - 2019 - Clr James Journal 25 (1):227-235.
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  28. The Politics of Édouard Glissant’s Right to Opacity.Benjamin P. Davis - 2019 - Clr James Journal 25 (1):59-70.
    The central claim of this essay is that Édouard Glissant’s concept of “opacity” is most fruitfully understood not as a built-in protection of a population or as a summary term for cultural difference, but rather as a political accomplishment. That is, opacity is not a given but an achievement. Taken up in this way, opacity is relevant for ongoing decolonial work today.
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  29. Racial Capitalism in the Atlantic: A Review of Selwyn Cudjoe’s The Slave Master of Trinidad. [REVIEW]Zophia Edwards - 2019 - Clr James Journal 25 (1):287-296.
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  30. Symposium in Honor of James Hal Cone.Lewis Gordon - 2019 - Clr James Journal 25 (1):223-225.
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  31. Editor's Note.Paget Henry - 2019 - Clr James Journal 25 (1):1-3.
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  32. Caribbean Ecological Ethics: A Review of Glenn Sankatsing’s Quest to Rescue Our Future. [REVIEW]Paget Henry - 2019 - Clr James Journal 25 (1):310-321.
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  33. Africana Studies as an Interdisciplinary Discipline.Paget Henry - 2019 - Clr James Journal 25 (1):7-37.
    This paper outlines a code-theoretic approach to the substantive and pedagogical challenges created by the distinct interdisciplinary nature of the field of Africana Studies. It identifies some of the key discourse-constitutive codes and some strategies for suspending disciplinary boundaries created by these necessary codes, which should help us to navigate better the spaces between the disciplines engaged by Africana Studies. After examining these codes and methods for transcending them, the paper concludes with some pedagogical strategies for teaching these interdisciplinary aspects (...)
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  34. “Livity” and the Hermeneutics of the Self.Leslie R. James - 2019 - Clr James Journal 25 (1):195-219.
    This paper explores the concept of “livity,” the ground of Rastafari subjectivity. In its multifaceted nuances, “livity” represents the Rastafari invention of a religious tradition and discourse, whose ethos was fundamentally sacred, signified the immanence of the Absolute in dialectic with the Rastafari worldview and life world. Innovatively, the Rastafari coined the term “livity” to a discourse to combat despair, damnation, social death, and the existential chaos-monde they referred to as Babylon. In the process, the Rastafari reclaimed their power to (...)
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  35. The Afterlife of Beyond a Boundary: C. L. R. James in the Twenty-First Century.Leslie R. James - 2019 - Clr James Journal 25 (1):263-283.
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  36. Story of a Voyage to Saint-Domingue and to Virginia in the United States of America in 1793.Captain Guillaume Le Conte of Cherbourg & Henry F. Majewski - 2019 - Clr James Journal 25 (1):107-163.
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  37. Analysis and Review of Quest to Rescue Our Future by Glenn Sankatsing.Elaine Olaoye - 2019 - Clr James Journal 25 (1):297-309.
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  38. D'aga the Rebel on Land and at Sea.John Sailant - 2019 - Clr James Journal 25 (1):165-194.
    This article challenges scholarly understanding of an 1837 mutiny in the First West India Regiment. In the Anglo-Trinidadian narrative, African-born soldiers acted out of blind rage, failing in their rebellion because they lacked skill with rifles and bayonets and did not understand either the terrain of Trinidad or its location in the Atlantic littoral. This article’s counterargument is that the rebels, led by a former slave-trader, Dâaga, who had been kidnaped by Portuguese traders at either Grand-Popo or Little Popo, was, (...)
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  39. The Rainmaker’s Mistake.Marie Sairsingh - 2019 - Clr James Journal 25 (1):81-106.
    This paper explores the ways in which Erna Brodber’s The Rainmaker’s Mistake reshapes the genre of the historical novel to pose philosophical questions of being, and to interrogate the concept of freedom within the matrix of Caribbean emancipatory discourse. This chosen novelistic form examines history as that of human consciousness as well as expands the conception of time as a spiritual category. Brodber’s work poses and responds to philosophical questions regarding black ontology and existence, offering through the intricate and complex (...)
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  40. Action Is the Best Prediction.Glenn Sankatsing - 2019 - Clr James Journal 25 (1):71-80.
    In the Caribbean, we cannot stop the misconduct of irresponsible global actors who agitate the winds beyond their natural cycles and push the sea over our shores, but now, we should refuse to leave our destiny in the hands of those for whom nature’s only beauty is its monetary value. Humanity is reading on its earlier footprints before nature has had time to erase them. That undermines sustainability, the backbone of continuity, survival and development, which goes beyond the pleonasm of (...)
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  41. James Cone and the Black Resistance Tradition.Darryl Scriven - 2019 - Clr James Journal 25 (1):249-259.
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  42. James Cone’s Black-Power Hermeneutics.Josiah U. Young - 2019 - Clr James Journal 25 (1):237-248.
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  43. C.L.R. James’s Decolonial Humanism in Theory and Practice.Alyssa Adamson - 2018 - Clr James Journal 24 (1):153-176.
    This paper argues for the concept of a decolonial humanism at the heart of C.L.R. James’s theoretical and political engagements. In exploring the concept of decolonial humanism, the paper moves through three major sections dealing with some of the definitive epistemic and political aspects of James’s work: a critique of Enlightenment Humanism and European Marxism without disavowing the aspirations of universal human emancipation; James’s work with the Johnson-Forest Tendency, the Pan-Africanist movement, and his attempts at labor organizing in Trinidad first (...)
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  44. Cedric Robinson’s Black Marxism.Bedour Alagraa - 2018 - Clr James Journal 24 (1):301-312.
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  45. No Revolutionary Decolonization Without Creolization.Drucilla Cornell - 2018 - Clr James Journal 24 (1):273-278.
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  46. Review of Filosofía Moderna del Caribe Hispano by Carlos Rojas Osorio. [REVIEW]Gabriel José Rivera Cotto & Rosa Cordero Cruz - 2018 - Clr James Journal 24 (1):333-344.
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  47. Creolization and Philosophical Anthropology.Douglas Ficek - 2018 - Clr James Journal 24 (1):279-283.
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  48. Well Chosen White Blood.Johman Carvajal Godoy - 2018 - Clr James Journal 24 (1):239-253.
    This paper examines the discourse of white supremacy in the intellectual history and socio-historical development in the nation of Colombia. In particular, it focuses on the period after the gaining of political independence from Spain in 1819. Further, the paper focuses on the texts of two writers who spanned late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. These writers are Miguel Jiménez López and Luis López de Mesa. The paper develops in detail the white supremacist discourses of these two writers, along with (...)
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  49. Counter-Novels.Shawn Gonzalez - 2018 - Clr James Journal 24 (1):89-105.
    While Sylvia Wynter emphasizes the written word’s capacity to transform our systems of organizing knowledge, she repeatedly questions the extent to which novels can have this transformative capacity. Both her theoretical writing and the plot of her 1962 novel The Hills of Hebron emphasize the novel’s limitations. However, Wynter does not totally reject the form. Instead, she reimagines the novel through the idea of the “counter-novel,” developed in conjunction with her close reading of Ralph Ellison’s The Invisible Man. This essay (...)
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  50. Ethics of Opacity in Harold Sonny Ladoo’s No Pain Like This Body.Shawn Gonzalez - 2018 - Clr James Journal 24 (1):215-237.
    Harold Sonny Ladoo’s 1972 novel No Pain Like This Body has been analyzed for its seminal representation of the traumas experienced by a formerly indentured Indo-Trinidadian family in the early twentieth century. However, relatively little attention has been given to Ladoo’s experimentation with multiple languages, particularly English, Trinidadian Creole, and Hindi. This article argues that Ladoo’s multilingualism offers a guide for approaching the traumatic experiences he represents. While some aspects of the novel, such as its glossary, make the characters’ language (...)
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1 — 50 / 319