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  1. Philosophical Ethics of Happiness: Rethinking Farabi’s Treatise “Attainment of Happiness”.Mostafa Younesie - manuscript
    In this paper in the context of philosophical ethics I want to explore the classical reception of Farabi from Happiness through Aristotle's Nicomachaean Ethics.
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  2. Co-Reading Aristotle’s Practical Reasoning.Mostafa Younesie - manuscript
    In Islamic Arabic /Persian thought speculations about ethics may be divided into textual / scriptural; theological; religious; and philosophical too. The “philosophical ethics” has within itself Socratic, Platonic, Aristotelian and neo-Platonic trends and versions with such main thinkers such as Farabi; Avicenna; and Averroes. Here we will concentrate on Farabi and those aspects of his speculations that are Aristotelian and can be reordered and arranged around “practical reasoning”.
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  3. The Criticism Of Democracy in Plato and Farabi.Muharrem Hafız - unknown - Yeditepe'de Felsefe (Philosophy at Yeditepe) 7.
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  4. Al-Farabi’s Images in Advance.Katharine Loevy - forthcoming - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy.
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  5. Necessary Existence and the Doctrine of Being in Avicenna's Metaphysics of the Healing.Daniel D. De Haan - 2020 - Brill.
    In Necessary Existence and the Doctrine of Being in Avicenna’s Metaphysics of the Healing Daniel De Haan explicates the central argument of Avicenna’s metaphysical masterpiece. De Haan argues that the most fundamental primary notion in Avicenna’s metaphysics is neither being nor thing but is the necessary ( wājib), which Avicenna employs to demonstrate the existence and true-nature of the divine necessary existence in itself. This conclusion is established through a systematic investigation of how Avicenna’s theory of a demonstrative science is (...)
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  6. Remark on Al-Fārābī's Missing Modal Logic and its Effect on Ibn Sīnā.Wilfrid Hodges - 2019 - Eshare: An Iranian Journal of Philosophy 1 (3):39-73.
    We reconstruct as much as we can the part of al-Fārābī's treatment of modal logic that is missing from the surviving pages of his Long Commentary on the Prior Analytics. We use as a basis the quotations from this work in Ibn Sīnā, Ibn Rushd and Maimonides, together with relevant material from al-Fārābī's other writings. We present a case that al-Fārābī's treatment of the dictum de omni had a decisive effect on the development and presentation of Ibn Sīnā's modal logic. (...)
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  7. Al-Fārābi on the Role of Philosophy of History in the History of Civilization.Georgios Steiris - 2018 - In Christian and Islamic Philosophies of Time. Wilmington USA: Vernon Press. pp. 135-144.
    This volume constitutes an attempt at bringing together philosophies of time—or more precisely, philosophies on time and, in a concomitant way, history—emerging from Christianity’s and Islam’s intellectual histories. Starting from the Neoplatonic heritage and the voice of classical philosophy, the volume enters the Byzantine and Arabic intellectual worlds up to Ibn Al-Arabi’s times. A conscious choice in this volume is not to engage with, perhaps, the most prominent figures of Christian and Arabic philosophy, i.e., Augustine on the one hand and (...)
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  8. Review: What is Islam? The Importance of Being Islamic by Shahab Ahmed. [REVIEW]Khalil Andani - 2016 - Islam and Christian-Muslim Relations 28:114-117.
    ‘[A] valid concept of “Islam” must denote and connote all possible “Islams,” whether abstract or “real,” mental or social’ (104)... Ahmed seeks to avoid two major pitfalls: (1) making Islam into a static essence or a category within an essentialist framework – such as proscription/prescription, ‘religion’,‘civilization’, ‘culture’, ‘orthodoxy’, etc., and (2) rendering Islam into a totally incoherent concept by conceding that there are as many islams as there are communities or individuals. Ahmed’s thesis (presented in Chapter 5) is that Islam (...)
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  9. Islamic Philosophy & the Ethics of Belief.Anthony Robert Booth - 2016 - Palgrave-Macmillan.
    In this book the author argues that the Falasifa, the Philosophers of the Islamic Golden Age, are usefully interpreted through the prism of the contemporary, western ethics of belief. He contends that their position amounts to what he calls ‘Moderate Evidentialism’ – that only for the epistemic elite what one ought to believe is determined by one’s evidence. The author makes the case that the Falasifa’s position is well argued, ingeniously circumvents issues in the epistemology of testimony, and is well (...)
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  10. Intentionality, Politics, And Religion.Mohammed Azadpur - 2015 - Religious Inquiries 4 (8):17-22.
    The idea that intentionality is the distinctive mark of the mental or that only mental phenomena have intentionality emerged in the philosophical tradition after Franz Brentano. Much of contemporary philosophy is dedicated to a rejection of the view that mental phenomena have original intentionality. In other words, main strands of contemporary philosophy seek to naturalize intentionality of the mental by tracing it to linguistic intentionality. So in order to avoid the problematic claim that a physical phenomenon can in virtue of (...)
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  11. Alfarabi's Imaginative Critique: Overflowing Materialism in Virtuous Community.Joshua M. Hall - 2015 - South African Journal of Philosophy 34 (2):175-192.
    Though currently marginalised in Western philosophy, tenth-century Arabic philosopher Abu Nasr Alfarabi is one of the most important thinkers of the medieval era. In fact, he was known as the ‘second teacher’ (after Aristotle) to philosophers such as Avicenna and Averroes. As this epithet suggests, Alfarabi and his successors engaged in a critical and creative dialogue with thinkers from other historical traditions, including that of the Ancient Greeks, although the creativity of his part is often marginalised as well. In this (...)
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  12. How Strauss Read Farabi's Summary of Plato's "Laws".Daniel Tanguay - 2013 - In Rafael Major (ed.), Leo Strauss's Defense of the Philosophic Life: Reading "What is Political Philosophy?". University of Chicago Press.
  13. Reason Unbound: On Spiritual Practice in Islamic Peripatetic Philosophy.Mohammad Azadpur - 2012 - New York, USA: SUNY Press.
    This intriguing work offers a new perspective on Islamic Peripatetic philosophy, critiquing modern receptions of such thought and highlighting the contribution it can make to contemporary Western philosophy. Mohammad Azadpur focuses on the thought of Alfarabi and Avicenna, who, like ancient Greek philosophers and some of their successors, viewed philosophy as a series of spiritual exercises. However, Muslim Peripatetics differed from their Greek counterparts in assigning importance to prophecy. The Islamic philosophical account of the cultivation of the soul to the (...)
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  14. Art As It Is, and Art As It Should Be: An Analytical Study of Fārābī.Nadia Maftouni - 2012 - Transcendent Philosophy Journal 13:239-248.
    Fārābī discusses two kinds of art: art as it is, and art as it should be – that is, utopian art. Art as it is contains desirable and undesirable aspects. But t utopian art, the art of the utopian artist, consists of only that which is desirable. With reference to this art, Fārābī explains how it brings goodness and happiness into the imagination, and moderates the feelings. Undesirable and wicked art is just the opposite; it corrupts thoughts, and inflames sensual (...)
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  15. The Return of Abu Nasr Al-Farabi.Paul Rahe - 2012 - Reason Papers 34 (2):28-37.
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  16. Les traces du Grand commentaire d’al-Fārābī à la Rhétorique d’Aristote dans la traduction arabo-latine de la Rhétorique par Hermann l’Allemand.Frédérique Woerther - 2012 - Bulletin de Philosophie Medievale 54:137-154.
    This study attempts to identify three passages in which Hermann the German, translator of the Arabic version of Aristotle’s Rhetoric into Latin, assembled extracts from Al-Fārābī’s Great Commentary on the Rhetoric, and two notes in which he mentions the Arabic philosopher by name. The criteria for isolating these passages used by W.F. Boggess in an earlier study were too general. In the article I present an edition of the five passages in question, based on the two sole manuscripts that preserve (...)
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  17. Conceptualization of Religious Art in Farabi's Philosophy.Nadia Maftuni - 2011 - Kheradnameh Sadra Quarterly 63.
    Farabi has placed artists as the carriers of religion in the second place in utopia and after the prophetic government. He believes that the angel of revelation emanates all intelligibles to the rational faculty of the Prophet and then to his imaginal faculty. Due to their low capabilities or habits, the public are incapable of the rational perception of happiness and the truth. Therefore, the Prophet , who himself enjoys intellectual mastery over all realities based on certain arguments, revealed their (...)
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  18. Alfarabi, The Attainment of Happiness ; Alfarabi, Plato's Laws ; Avicenna, On the Divisions of the Rational Sciences.Joshua Parens & Joseph C. Macfarland - 2011 - In Joshua Parens & Joseph C. Macfarland (eds.), Medieval Political Philosophy: A Sourcebook. Cornell University Press.
  19. About Todros Todrosi's Medieval Hebrew Translation of Al-Fārābī's Lost Long Commentary/Gloss-Commentary On Aristotle's Topics, Book VIII.Mauro Zonta - 2011 - History and Philosophy of Logic 32 (1):37-45.
    Among the many logical works by Ab? Nasr Muhammad al-F?r?b? (870?950), there are two commentaries on particular books or points of Aristotle's Topics, whose original Arabic text has been apparently lost. A number of quotations of one or both of them, translated into Hebrew, has been recently found in a philosophical anthology by a fourteenth-century Provençal Jewish scholar, Todros Todrosi. In this article, a detailed list of these quotations is given, and a tentative short examination of the contents of each (...)
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  20. Al-Fârâbî.Thérèse-Anne Druart - 2010 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 84:1-17.
    The paper first presents the necessary background to appreciate al-Fârâbî’s views and his originality. It explains the issues Anicent philosophers faced: the natural vs. the conventional origin of language, the problem of ambiguous words, and the difficulty to express Greek thought into Latin. It then sketches andcontrasts the views of Christianity and Islam on the origin of language and the diversity of idioms. It argues that al-Fârâbî follows the philosophical tradition butdevelops it in sophisticated and original manner by telling the (...)
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  21. Al-Fārābī on the Method of Astronomy.Damien Janos - 2010 - Early Science and Medicine 15 (3):237-265.
    This article analyzes al-Fārābī's conception of the astronomical method by examining rarely studied texts such as the K. al-mūsīqā and K. al-burhān and by addressing key issues such as the subject matter of astronomy, the techniques used to derive the first principles of this science, the relation between astrology, astronomy, physics, and metaphysics, and the place of al-Fārābī in the Arabic astronomical tradition. The analysis indicates that al-Fārābī's theories combine material from the Greek astronomical tradition, especially Geminus, as well as (...)
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  22. Aquinas on Limits to Political Responsibility for Virtue.Michael J. Sweeney - 2009 - Review of Metaphysics 62 (4):819-847.
    Al-Farabi saw himself as inheriting from Aristotle the problem of limits to political responsibility for virtue. If the state possesses the authority to habituate citizens to virtue, what are the limits to that responsibility? Aristotle establishes two main limits: the family and the size of the state. Al-Farabi rejects both. Thomas Aquinas’s view of marriage as a sacrament, on the other hand, reinforces the Aristotelian position that the family is the most basic limit to public responsibility for virtue. In fact, (...)
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  23. Farabi Method Towards Aristotleís Eudemonia.Mostafa Younesie - 2008 - Skepsis: A Journal for Philosophy and Interdisciplinary Research 19 (1-2):29-46.
    Regarding Farabi writing on Happiness, the sources of his specific manuscript will be explored and examined. As a result, we reach his eclectic reading and reception of Aristotle's philosophy.
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  24. Classical Arabic Philosophy: An Anthology of Sources.Jon McGinnis & David C. Reisman (eds.) - 2007 - Hackett.
    This volume introduces the major classical Arabic philosophers through substantial selections from the key works (many of which appear in translation for the first time here) in each of the fields—including logic, philosophy of science, natural philosophy, metaphysics, ethics, and politics—to which they made significant contributions. -/- An extensive Introduction situating the works within their historical, cultural, and philosophical contexts offers support to students approaching the subject for the first time, as well as to instructors with little or no formal (...)
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  25. The Arabico-Islamic Background of Al-Fārābī's Logic.Sadik Türker - 2007 - History and Philosophy of Logic 28 (3):183-255.
    This paper examines al-F?r?b?'s logical thought within its Arabico-Islamic historical background and attempts to conceptualize what this background contributes to his logic. After a brief exposition of al-F?r?b?'s main problems and goals, I shall attempt to reformulate the formal structure of Arabic linguistics (AL) in terms of the ontological and formal characteristics that Arabic logic is built upon. Having discussed the competence of al-F?r?b? in the history of AL, I will further propose three interrelated theses about al-F?r?b?'s logic, in terms (...)
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  26. Abstraction in Al-F'r'bî.Richard C. Taylor - 2006 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 80:151-168.
    Al-Fârâbî’s thought on intellect was known to the Latin West through the translation of his Letter on the Intellect, through the Long Commentary on the De Anima by Averroes and through some other works. Al-Fârâbî identified the active power of intellect in Aristotle’s De Anima 3.5 as the unique and separately existing Agent Intellect, but the role of the Agent Intellect in forming intelligibles in act in the human soul is by no means unequivocally clear. Further, the apprehension of intelligibles (...)
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  27. Medieval Islamic Philosophical Writings.Muhammad Ali Khalidi (ed.) - 2004 - Cambridge University Press.
    Philosophy in the Islamic world emerged in the ninth century and continued to flourish into the fourteenth century. It was strongly influenced by Greek thought, but Islamic philosophers also developed an original philosophical culture of their own, which had a considerable impact on the subsequent course of Western philosophy. This volume offers new translations of philosophical writings by Farabi, Ibn Sina, Ghazali, Ibn Tufayl, and Ibn Rushd. All of the texts presented here were very influential and invite comparison with later (...)
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  28. Une Note Sur Les Sources Philosophiques du Ps.-Farabi, la Quiddité de L'Âme.Rémi Brague - 2003 - Arabic Sciences and Philosophy 13 (2):239-241.
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  29. La quiddite de l'ame, traite populaire neoplatonisant faussement attribuee a al-Farabi: traduction annotee et commentee.Gad Freudenthal - 2003 - Arabic Sciences and Philosophy 13 (2):173.
    The classic Arabic bibliographies ascribe to al-Farabi a treatise entitled Fi mahiyyat al-nafs (“On the Essence of the Soul”), of which no Arabic manuscript is known to exist. There is however a Hebrew text, translated from the Arabic by Zera[hudot]iah ben She'altiel [Hudot]en of Rome in 1284, which is ascribed to al-Farabi in all the manuscripts and which carries the title Ma'amar be-mahut ha-nefesh (“Treatise on the Essence of the Soul”). Since Steinschneider, this text is taken to be the translation (...)
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  30. Al-Fārābi on the Democratic City.Muhammad Ali Khalidi - 2003 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 11 (3):379 – 394.
    This essay will explore some of al-Farabi’s paradoxical remarks on the nature and status of the democratic city (al-madinah al-jama'iyyah). In describing this type of non-virtuous city, Farabi departs significantly from Plato, according the democratic city a superior standing and casting it in a more positive light. Even though at one point Farabi follows Plato in considering the timocratic city to be the best of the imperfect cities, at another point he implies that the democratic city occupies this position. Since (...)
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  31. Al-Farabi's Philosophical Lexicon = Qamus Al-Farabi Al-Falsafi.Ilai Alon - 2002
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  32. El intelecto agente en Al-Farabi.Rafael Ramón Guerrero - 2002 - Revista Española de Filosofía Medieval 9:19-32.
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  33. Alfarabi, Avicenna, and Averroes, on Intellect: Their Cosmologies, Theories of the Active Intellect, and Theories of Human Intellect.Richard C. Taylor - 1997 - Philosophical Review 106 (3):482-485.
    After a very brief introduction, Davidson begins with an informed and detailed account of the views of Aristotle and his major commentators, whose writings had enormous influence on the development of the medieval traditions. Davidson's account is supplemented with a critical exposition of the relevant teachings from the Plotiniana Arabica, from al-Kindi, and from a treatise on the soul attributed to Porphyry in the Arabic tradition. Impressive as all this is, it is simply stage setting for Davidson's detailed accounts of (...)
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  34. Morale islamica.Sergio Volodia Marcello Cremaschi - 1996 - In Enciclopedia della Filosofia e delle Scienze Umane. Novara, Italy: deAgostini. pp. 439-440.
    A short reconstruction of the origin and evolution of Islamic moral doctrines and their re-interpretation by Arabic philosophers.
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  35. Usul Va Mabadi-I Falsafah-I Siyasi-I Farabi Sharh-I Nazariyah-I Madinah-I Fazilah Ba Tatabiq Bar Ara -I Aflatun Va Aristu.Farnaz Nazirzadah Kirmani - 1996
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  36. History of Islamic Philosophy.Seyyed Hossein Nasr & Oliver Leaman (eds.) - 1995. - Routledge.
    Islamic Philosophy has often been treated as mainly of historical interest, belonging to the history of ideas rather than to philosophy. This is volume challenges this belief. The Routledge History of Philosophy is made up entirely of essays by a distinguished list of writers. They provide detailed discussions of the most important thinkers and the key concepts in Islamic philosophy, from earliest times to the present day. Fifty authors from over sixteen countries have contributed to this volume. Each Together the (...)
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  37. Joep Lameer, Al-Fārābī and Aristotelian Syllogistic: Greek Theory and Islamic Practice, Leiden-New York-Köln (E.J. Brill) 1994, Xx + 351 P. ISBN 90-04-09884-4. [REVIEW]Allan Bäck - 1995 - Vivarium 33 (2):246-249.
  38. Metaphysics as Rhetoric: Alfarabi's Summary of Plato's "Laws".Joshua Parens - 1995 - State University of New York Press.
  39. Du Coran À la Philosophie la Langue Arabe Et la Formation du Vocabulaire Philosophique de Farabi.Jacques Langhade - 1994
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  40. La "Classificazione Delle Scienze" di Al-Fārābī Nella Tradizione Ebraica: Edizione Critica E Traduzione Annotata Della Versione Ebraica di Qalonymos Ben Qalonymos Ben Meʾir.Mauro Zonta. [REVIEW]Oliver Leaman - 1994 - Speculum 69 (3):925-926.
  41. Al-Farabi and His SchoolIan Richard Netton.Muhsin Mahdi - 1994 - Isis 85 (2):307-307.
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  42. Al-Farabi, Avicenna, & Averroes on Intellect.Herbert A. Davidson - 1992 - Oxford University Press.
    The distinction between the potential intellect and the active intellect was first drawn by Aristotle. Medieval Islamic, Jewish, Christian philosophers, and European philosophers in the sixteenth century considered it a possible key to deciphering the nature of man and the universe. In this book, Herbert Davidson examines the treatment of intellect in Alfarabi , Avicenna and Averroes , with particular attention to the way in which they addressed the tangle of issues that grew up around the active intellect.
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  43. Logic and Aristotle's Rhetoric and Poetics in Medieval Arabic Philosophy, And: The Poetics of Alfarabi and Avicenna.Parviz Morewedge - 1992 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 30 (4):605-608.
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  44. Textos de Al-Farabi En Una Obra Andalusí Del Siglo XI: "Gayat Al-Hakim" de Abu Maslama Al-Mayriti.Rafael Ramón Guerrero - 1991 - Al-Qantara 12 (1):3-18.
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  45. Review of Shukri B. Abed, Aristotelian Logic and Arabic Language in Alfārābī.Hossein Ziai - 1991 - International Journal of Middle Eastern Studies 24 (4):708-711..
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  46. Al-Fārābī's Imperfect StateAl-Farabi on the Perfect State: Abū Naṣr Al-Fārābī's Mabādiʾ Ārāʾ Ahl Al-Madīna Al-FāḍilaAl-Farabi's Imperfect StateAl-Farabi on the Perfect State: Abu Nasr Al-Farabi's Mabadi Ara Ahl Al-Madina Al-Fadila.Muhsin Mahdi & Richard Walzer - 1990 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 110 (4):691.
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  47. F. W. Zimmermann: Al-Farabi's Commentary and Short Treatise on Aristotle's De Interpretatione. Pp. Clii + 287. Oxford: O.U.P. For the British Academy, 1981 . Paper, £22.50. [REVIEW]James E. Montgomery - 1989 - The Classical Review 39 (1):143-144.
  48. Al-Farabi’s Commentary and Short Treatise on Aristotle’s De Interpretatione.Alfred L. Ivry - 1988 - Ancient Philosophy 8 (2):309-312.
  49. Duns Scotus on the Goodness of God.Marilyn McCord Adams - 1987 - Faith and Philosophy 4 (4):486-505.
    Over the past thirty years, analytical philosophers of religion have confronted the problem of evil in the guise of the atheistic argument from evil against the existence of God. Many have met it from the posture of defense, constructing logically possible morally sufficient reasons for divine permission of evils from the materials of religion-neutral value-theory. At best, such defenses vindicate divine goodness along the dimension “producer of global goods,” while neglecting the religiously more relevant dimension of His goodness to individual (...)
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  50. Al-Fārābī's Commentary and Short Treatise on Aristotle’s De Interpretatione. [REVIEW]Nicholas L. Heer - 1986 - International Studies in Philosophy 18 (3):118-119.
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